2016 Gibson SG Static Cling:

Discussion in 'Tone Zone' started by Robert Herndon, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. Robert Herndon

    Robert Herndon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2016
    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    448

    Great ideas!!!

    Yes, I got a 10 foot roll, 60mm wide of the good copper tape with conductive adhesive....

    On my 1987 Squire Strat, I actually soldered the bottom of the cavity tape to ground....
     
  2. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Messages:
    4,946
    Likes Received:
    2,788
    Location:
    St. Pete FL
    If you look at my mods on The Lady, I did the same while isolating the controls from the shield save for that one point.
     
  3. Robert Herndon

    Robert Herndon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2016
    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    448
    Shouldn't the cover be shielded too on the backside????

    How critical is it to tie all the copper together??? I dont think I tied all the copper together on my Stratocaster....
     
  4. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Messages:
    4,946
    Likes Received:
    2,788
    Location:
    St. Pete FL
    ??? It's has shielding facing the cavity..... Both factory and copper that I added.

    The important thing is that it all connects to the common ground. If a piece doesn't, it serves no purpose. As long as you don't create a ground loop, how you accomplish it doesn't matter.

    On mine, I soldered a short bit of 18ga tinned buss wire from the neck cavity to the bridge cavity, then from the bridge to control cavities I used a separate piece.
    My cavities are therefore connected in series. I bent the buss wire to fit as tightly to the wall of the wire bores as possible then soldered it to the shield. Kinda staple shaped if you could see it through the wood. I'd provide a picture, but they didn't turn out due to lighting / flash issues.
     
    Robert Herndon likes this.
  5. Super fuzz

    Super fuzz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2016
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    34
    Both of my Gibson guitars had large amounts of static new. It took a couple of years to totally go away in my Les Paul. My SG still has quite a bit of static, but not nearly as bad as was new. The SG is almost a year old.

    I have no idea what causes it, but it definitely seems to be in the finish some how.
     
  6. Dave_Death

    Dave_Death Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    2,126
    Likes Received:
    1,356
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    Nitro off-gasses for quite a long time. If it is anything to do with the finish I suspect this off-gassing is at the root of it, given that it goes away after a couple of years.

    I would make sure any shielding is continuous and grounded to the jack. Hell, you could put a piece of that dryer anti-static sheet between the two pickups if you think it would help
     
  7. Robert Herndon

    Robert Herndon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2016
    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    448
    Lot's of static issues on the web....

    Here is one of many I found....

    I recently posted that I had a ton of static coming through my BRAND NEW Gibson SG. We decided collectively that it was a problem with the shielding in the electronics. Well, BINGO!!!! Gibson is no longer shielding the electronics in all of their guitars. This includes (but is not limited to) seemingly higher end Les Pauls and SGs.

    Given the fact that Guitar Center did not know about this, they fixed mine free of charge. It would have cost me $80 to have it done (not a big deal but I had just dropped $1300 on it!!).

    It works fine now and plays great! I'm really happy with the guitar now that it works the way it should. I would advise looking into this though before picking up a newer Gibson electric. To test it out, plug it in and turn up a bit. Rub your hand over the plate on the back of the guitar behind the pots. Also, rub it against your shirt and pants. You'll most likely hear some crackling. If you still want the guitar, point it out to the sales person and see if they will shield the electronics for you before you buy it. If you are buying online or used from someone, well, I don't know what to tell you.

    I don't know why Gibson is letting these out like this! One of the worst ones I plugged in was a $2700 Les Paul. It was a beautiful piece but if you pay this much and get it home only to hear static coming through your playing, well, that's just unacceptable to me!

    Anyhow, hope this helps.
     
  8. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Messages:
    4,946
    Likes Received:
    2,788
    Location:
    St. Pete FL
    No real surprise there.
     
  9. Dave_Death

    Dave_Death Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    2,126
    Likes Received:
    1,356
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    1. I think the only shielding in Gibsons these days is in the PCB itself. They seem to have some kind of shielding built in to the back of them. That's it. If you don't have a PCB then I suspect they didn't compensate with paint.

    2. You check the continuity of a ground with the continuity checker on a multimeter. Depending on the tape used and how you apply it overlapping the tape might be enough. I just used slug tape and that was okay.

    3. Check that the grounding of your pots and bridge is complete.

    4. See the comments above about the nitrocellulose. Issues with nitro tend to die down over time. It off-gasses for a long time after they are done. Hence the new Gibson smell.
     
    WallaceWinston likes this.
  10. WallaceWinston

    WallaceWinston Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2015
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    101
    Location:
    USA
    Mmm I love the smell of fresh Gibsons in the morning.
     
    grausch likes this.
  11. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2015
    Messages:
    6,413
    Likes Received:
    5,885
    Location:
    Sutton Québec
    I say stuff all the cavities with fabric softener sheets.
     
  12. JCarno

    JCarno Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2013
    Messages:
    245
    Likes Received:
    141
    Location:
    Finger Lakes
    I stole this from a2dconverter. Hope he don't mind. :cheers:
     
  13. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Messages:
    4,946
    Likes Received:
    2,788
    Location:
    St. Pete FL
    Some simple electrical tape probably would have done the job and been ∞² easier.
     
  14. jvin248

    jvin248 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2016
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    177
    .

    I went through this for a guy with an old E-series Strat last summer that he was trying to record with. The fix is to take conductive tape (aluminum roof flashing or aluminum furnace tape $7 a roll and will cover two dozen guitars) and cover the back of the pickguard plus put tabs at the screw points to connect that to the ground system. Any plastic plate will be susceptible to this, pickguard, rear cover.

    If you shield the entire cavities with tape (a good thing to really quiet a guitar), make sure you are creating an 'enclosed box'. Noise will get in there like shining a flashlight through any gaps in the shielding. Partial shielding will help, but you want to box all that stuff up and it's just as much work to do some as do it all when the guitar is open. Including unshielded wire runs (Fender Strats and Teles classically use an unshielded pair to the output jack, meanwhile even Epiphone Specials use shielded cable runs).

    Glad you got your guitar figured out.
    .
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice