61 Standard Fretboard Raised Above Binding. Issue?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Andrew Clope, Mar 31, 2020.

  1. Andrew Clope

    Andrew Clope New Member

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    61 Standard SG. While conditioning the fretboard, I noticed that the board is raised higher than the binding rather than being even/level with it. This only is the case in a couple spots, as you can see around frets 2/3, then flattens out as you go up.

    Does anyone know what causes this? Is it normal? Is it an issue?

    There is a hair that looks like a crack up around 4, I had to go back and check after I saw it in the picture. No issue there.

    Thanks!
     

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  2. jonnyfez

    jonnyfez Member

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    I think this is more about binding shrinking or wearing down than fretboard raising.
     
  3. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    The binding is filed down to fretboard level between the frets, leaving the nibs sticking up. It looks as if the filing was a bit over-enthusiastic at some points, hitting the fretboard as well as the binding. The edge of the fretboard seems to follow the angled profile of the binding adjacent to it. The third fret in the second picture seems to show this well.
     
    Satellitedog likes this.
  4. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    Looks totally normal
     
  5. Andrew Clope

    Andrew Clope New Member

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    Great, thanks for the replies everyone!
     

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