64 SG Restoration

Discussion in 'Vintage SG' started by Bob L, Apr 24, 2020.

  1. Bob L

    Bob L Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Chicago
    I took my 64 SG to a local shop for some restoration work. Here is a photo of the completed work. There is a long story behind this guitar, which I can elaborate on later if there is interest. I look forward to getting the guitar back in my hands!
     

    Attached Files:

    fernieite and Chuteboxehero like this.
  2. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Messages:
    872
    Likes Received:
    432
    Location:
    Minneapolis
    looks great... got any pics of the before...in process...? and you can't say
    "there's a story" and just leave it hanging there.
     
    RobertD likes this.
  3. Bob L

    Bob L Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Chicago
    It's a long story, some of which I posted here several years back. I bought this guitar in 1974 when I was 18 and didn't know much. The previous owner had made several modifications, all of which were poorly done. Unfortunately I never took a photo of the guitar as purchased.

    A third pickup had been added and removed. The rout was then covered by a small piece of plastic and held down with a screw. One of the first things I did was to buy a full size pick guard to cover up the rout. I also had Grovers installed. In retrospect, replacing the Klusons was unnecessary and made the guitar neck heavy, but all the famous guitar players had Grovers on their Gibsons back then. The photo titled "64sg before repairs" shows the result.

    Notice that I had to trim the pick guard to accommodate another modification. The original bridge posts had been replaced by a third party base plate, which was routed into the top. The adjustment wheels were so large that they did not fit the recesses in the ABR-1 bridge and had to be positioned very close to the body. I had to trim the guard around the wheels. Besides that, the plate was mounted at right angles to the strings. This resulted in inability to intonate the A and low E strings. I put up with that condition for a long time.

    Around 10 years ago, I removed the bridge post plate and with the help of a luthier friend patched the rout. Proper bridge posts were installed to angle the bridge, and a new pick guard installed. This allowed me to intonate the guitar and was a big improvement in playability.

    The Bigsby was another poorly done mod. It was not the right model for a flat top guitar. In order to get a break angle over the saddles, it was recessed in the top. It worked, but it just didn't look good and bothered me. This latest restoration involved patching the Bigsby rout and installing a Gibson vibrola. The vibrola covers a lot of the patch but a fair portion would be visible. The shop that did the work did an excellent job of blending the patch into the original wood and finish.

    While they were doing the patchwork, I asked them to replace the Grover tuners with the original Klusons, which I had kept. The guitar is now close to its original configuration, except for the full size pick guard.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 24, 2020
    Logan likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice