Advice on SG-400

Discussion in 'Epiphone SG' started by Ron Cortese, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. Ron Cortese

    Ron Cortese New Member

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    Hello There !

    I am new to the forum and looking for some advice.

    A guy is willing to sell me an SG-400 , I believe the faded version, for $100. The issue I’m facing is that there is a small crack on the back of the neck. I can’t tell if the crack is in the wood or just on the surface.

    Can someone take a look and let me know what you think ?

    Thanks in advance
     

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  2. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    That's not a surface crack. It must be on both sides. $100 is a good deal if everything else is A-1. That's not something hard to repair.

    Oh ... and welcome Ron.
     
  3. Ron Cortese

    Ron Cortese New Member

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    Thanks for the advice DrBGood. I don’t recall seeing a crack on both sides. I looked it over for quite a while.

    Other than that the Guitar didn’t have any other noticeable wear and tear however it was a bit dusty. The pickup selector was also a bit scratchy when choosing a different pup.
     
  4. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Then you can play it as it if it's stable. If the crack ever gets worse, like I said, it's not a big thing. Gibsons get it all the time and they don't throw them away.

    As for the scratchy toggle, some lubricant spray will take care of that. I spray my numerous Epiphone once a year and I've never had to replace any switch up to now. Same for volume and tone pots.
     
  5. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    welcome to ETSG, and let's see some more photos.

    The good Doctor knows a lot, so I'll say +1 on his opinion.
    If that crack opens up, you can glue it with Titebond forced in,
    or you can buy some "water thin superglue" from a luthier supply
    shop like StewMac, and let that run down inside the crack, and
    then clamp it.

    Good luck. Even if you pass on this one, there seem to be plenty
    of sound G-400s out there for sale for very reasonable prices.
     
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  6. Ron Cortese

    Ron Cortese New Member

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    Here are some other pics of the Guitar. Based on the serial number it looks to be a 2014 model I believe.
     

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  7. Ron Cortese

    Ron Cortese New Member

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    My buddy that has built a few guitars had this to say

    “That looks suspicious. It looks like finish, but it's right where a scarf joint would be.”
     
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  8. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    Like the Doc said,"Then you can play it as it if it's stable."
    At $100, the repair, even if done in a shop would be worth it. My best player SG has a headstock reset.
    brokenheadstockdetail.jpg
    2¢ worth of Elmer's wood glue and set overnight. Excess glue washes off with water and makes a nice polish, too.
     
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  9. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    I'd drop $100 On that. If it's stable, cool! If it isn't, no biggie! Glue and clamp!
     
  10. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I'm with everyone else. Essentially there are two kinds of SG - ones with a broken headstock, and ones that don't have a broken headstock yet. The reason yours has broken is that they have built it like a Gibson, not an Epiphone. The normal G400 has a scarf joint just before the neck meets the headstock. This turns the grain round before the corner and protects the vulnerable spot from breakage.

    G400 scarf joint.jpg
     
  11. Ron Cortese

    Ron Cortese New Member

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    First off thanks to everyone for your comments and advice. I went ahead and pulled the trigger! I figured i didn't have too much to lose.

    As predicted by the good Dr there was a crack on the other side of the neck. I don't know how I missed it but sure enough it's there.

    I put some new strings on it last night and played for a bit and it stayed in tune very well and seems stable. I'm not sure if it will just be a matter of time or not before it gets worse but right now it seems A-OK. I will need to upgrade the electronics at some point because the toggle switch is causing the pickups to cut in / out.

    Here is a pic of the other side of the neck and a couple other as well.

    IMG_0820.jpg IMG_0826.jpg IMG_0828.jpg
     
  12. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Glad it is stable. One day you'll just want to attack the problem, but until then, play the sucker.

    As for the toggle cutting out, typical grime in there. Like I said, some lubricant spray will take care of that. But if you want to spend money on a Switchcraft you don't need, go ahead :h5:
     
  13. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Epiphone guitars respond very well to setup, and to upgrades.
    I agree that you should play the instrument for a good length of time
    before considering repairs/improvements.

    Spraying the components with DeOxit (or equivalent) is also a good thing
    to try. Dr. Gaudet has lots of experience, so I listen to him.

    The toggle switch seems like an achilles heel on Epi guitars, and I've
    replaced the wiring harness on three Epiphones as soon as the switch began
    to crap out on me. This can be done without spending huge amounts of money,
    but I wouldn't recommend this to you unless the parts were really malfunctioning.
    I've done mine because I have come to love both of my Epi guitars and wanted the
    best for them. *grins

    Your call. I suggest trying the spray fix, and then play the instrument a lot.
    That's how you know. If that crack begins to open up, you'll know it when you
    play it. I think it's a good score...
     
  14. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to agree with the Colonel here. The build standard of Epiphones is extremely high - much better than Gibson in some areas. It is the electronics that becomes the weak area eventually. They cry out for uprated pickups, switch and pots. Do that and you will have an SG that is likely better than a Gibson version, and still for much less money.
     

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