Buying a sg with fixed broken neck?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Dynamal, Sep 29, 2019.

  1. Dynamal

    Dynamal New Member

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    If it's repaired, how much do you think it would affeckt the price compared to an "unbroken" one? Always stayed away from the ones with broken necks.
     
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  2. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the break and the repair. Any pictures?
     
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  3. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    A repaired guitar of any type should be fine as long as it was repaired PROPERLY. Post some pics. My first electric (which is an epi G400) had a severe neck crack at the heel whcih caused major tuning instability and the bigsby I had on it didnt help. After many house party gigs it finally came off entirely and i was forced to either scrap it or repair it. The repair was far easier than i could have imagined. Ive had more trouble screwing on bolt on necks.
     
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  4. Dynamal

    Dynamal New Member

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    Dont have any pics, just meant in general? Best to avoid them, or no problem if its repaired in the right way?
     
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  5. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    No problem generally, provided the repair is sound. Have a look and gently put pressure on the neck in either direction. Look closely to see if there is any opening and closing of the break. If there is, walk away or offer stupid low money.
     
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  6. HackeIommi

    HackeIommi Active Member

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    Since seven or eight years I am using a Gibson Nighthawk with a repaired broken headstock without any problem. Fixed properly by a good luthier. Because of the headstock, I traded her with a 93 Korean G400 Epiphone.
     
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  7. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to ETSG!

    To answer your question quickly: A broken headstock is a common Gibson problem,
    and most luthiers repair several broken Gibson headstocks a month. Most luthiers have
    figured out how to do it well, so it's routine work, not a major event. If you break your
    prized Gibson at the headstock joint, it can be repaired by a qualified luthier.

    >A Gibson guitar that's been repaired by an expert will play just fine, and give
    excellent service, and probably out live you. But the value will be about half that
    of an unbroken one.


    >So if you value your guitar for the music it can make, a repaired break is no big
    deal. If you value your guitar for the money you might get for it, a repaired break
    is not a good investment. If your funds are limited and you want a Gibson guitar but can't
    afford a new one or even a fine used one, you might look for one that's been expertly
    repaired. Those will play great music, but you don't have to pay as much.

    >Avoid guitars repaired by their owners, on the kitchen table. You can tell by the
    edges of the break, usually. Amateurs who break their guitars will usually sit down
    at the bar, and work the break back and forth, trying to fit it together. Don't do that.
    Don't wiggle it, don't fuss with it, put it in its case and take it the next day to the
    best luthier you can find and/or afford. Let the luthier be the first to try and fit it
    together, because he will do this skillfully with glue on it, and then clamp it, Jed...

    >That crucial first fitting is one of the secrets to an expert repair. Many luthiers can
    fit it together well enough that you almost can't see the break. Even so, trying to get
    top dollar for a broken guitar constitutes fraud, a cheat, a lie. I say just play it, don't
    try and sell it.
     
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  8. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    Broken headstock should drop the price by about 50%. But it really does vary on the kind of break and the quality of the repair.
     
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  9. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    It's been said, but a decent repair should look like nothing more than a crack in the finish.
     
  10. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the break. You can have a stable structurally sound repair that’s very obvious.

    Some breaks go back together seamlessly. And a crack may not even be visible.

    Some repairs are crap but look perfect. Especially possible with a solid color over spray.

    But the uglier the repair the bigger the price drop should be.
     
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  11. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

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    I think if I had a broken guitar I'd spend the money to repair it and keep it if I really liked the guitar, but I dont think I would intentionally go out and buy one that was broken and repaired.
     
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  12. arcticsg

    arcticsg Well-Known Member

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    That's how I look at it also. ;)
     
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  13. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

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    Right! It only makes sense!
     
  14. jtees4

    jtees4 Well-Known Member

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    Assuming we are talking about a headstock break....the direct answer is 1.if it is repaired well, it should be fine. 2. It should be 40%ish off the normal used price. I have owned a couple and they were fine, but were bought at the right price.
     
  15. pancake81

    pancake81 Well-Known Member

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    I have written this responsebin length many times, and yes, the buyer must consider many variables. Such as, break location, repair, color match, resale potential, playability, etc.

    But the best advice I can give is this. If you can locate the same model or another SG you equally like without a break... spend the extra $150-250 and buy that one. A guitar with a break can be a fine instrument. But what if you get stuck with a junk repair job... what if you want to sell and take a bath on the price, etc.

    My final point is, the equivalent guitar without a break is usually 10-20% more, which in the long run isn’t that big.

    There is a time and a place when I would jump on a good repair job. But not to save $200
     
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  16. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    More like 40/50% more.
     
  17. pancake81

    pancake81 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah perhaps, depending on model, and location etc. personally I don’t see a huge value in Canada to buying a respires guitar, especially in older or vintage models. To me it’s two issues. One is the unknown of the break/repair; that only time will tell. And two, even if you can hold out an resell at your purchase cost, it may take a while. Unless I loved the guitar and had to have it, I would walk away. Save up the $ and buy one without a break/repair. YMMV...

    It’s like buying a crashed/repaired supercar. Is it worth it? Save the money and buy with confidence.
     
  18. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    Totally valid.

    Personally I love un-repaired broken headstock guitar’s.

    Cheap to buy and easy to fix.

    If it’s been repaired? That depends on who is telling me that the repair is solid.
     
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  19. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    My rule of thumb observation: broken headstock or neck = 50% loss in value. This is more important on higher end guitars though, don't know if a SG Special faded would be as dramatic since they are already inexpensive. But on a custom shop VOS SG you'd be looking at a pretty substantial price drop.

    Refinish is also a giant value decrease if it's a "prestige" guitar like a vintage one, or an older Les Paul standard or custom. Partially because not original, partially because might be hiding a repair.

    So if you have your heart set on a Les Paul Custom black beauty some day, look for a well repaired headstock with a refinish job, save tons of dough, prosper, and rock on. Never try to sell it though, probably not going to appreciate in value.
     
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  20. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    1dtlnkbk.jpg SGclsc.jpg
    Repaired break on SG Classic. A very good player, light action. Resale value c. $450 usd. vs. c.$800 usd in very good condition.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2019
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