Cites regulation

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by amoskei, Feb 12, 2017.

  1. amoskei

    amoskei New Member

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  2. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I'm 15 minutes from the American border and won't be able to sell my guitars to ... neighbours.

    Would saying the fretboard is baked maple fool them ?
     
  3. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    During the 2012 rosewood scare, I remember jokingly suggesting that both Gibson and
    Fender go about buying up all the dead bowling alleys in the country, so they could make
    guitars out of the fine hardwood used to make the lanes.

    Guitarists of the Future (if any) would play music on the Gibson "Brunswick" model
    or the new Fender AMF. Forum posts would then be concerned with the tonal qualities
    of nail holes found in guitar bodies made out of recycled bowling lanes.

    dunno what they might do with old Bowling Pins... maybe make headstocks for
    basses: The Fender "Rolling Thunder" model Bass. How 'bout it, hah?
    bowling alley56@100.jpg
    North America is blessed with plenty of useful hardwoods, so we ought not get our shorts in
    a bunch over supplies of tropical "tone wood" from third world countries with dicey political situations. Hell, given our political situation, the US seems to be just one more. We should make good guitars out of Cedar, like Seagull does, or Hickory, doc.

    I'd consider a bass called a "Louisville Sluggo" or a Gibson Shagbark...
    How 'bout a girl guitar model called the Fender "Sassy Fras"
     
  4. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Like tortoise shell picks and ivory piano keys, we'll adapt. This is more about the Chinese furniture trade than us, but unfortunately we get lumped in due to the difficulty in telling species apart.

    Richlite, baked maple, etc. There's other options.

    Cue the drama.
     
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  5. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    The magical picks made from unicorn hooves.
     
  6. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    The drama is about selling and buying used guitars. Well ... a bummer at the very least.
     
  7. njpaulc

    njpaulc Active Member

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    A lot of old mahogany upright pianos being scrapped, make a nice "sandwhich" body and plenty of leg the neck.
     
  8. SG John

    SG John Well-Known Member

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    r

    It's all about the furniture industry as far as lumber is concerned. The law covers many animal species as well. With old-growth South American Mahogany trees selling for as much as 4 million dollars on the black market, and rampant clear cutting for development or farming they needed to put the brakes on what is getting harvested, and how fast. This is also true of places like Bali, Borneo, Most of Indonesia and Malaysia in general, Madagascar, and most of Africa, Central and South America. Unfortunately, it only slows down the legal purchasing of hardwoods. It's a nice gesture, but it seems to be too-little, too-late. Particularly when greed and selfishness is concerned. Especially, with Trump now allowing U.S. companies to buy direct from African warlords in countries like Democratic Republic of Congo, and other proxy-war torn countries. We'll soon see a new flood of ebony, rosewood and other exotic lumbers on the market. Even though the ruling is meant more for mineral extraction, it will have a ripple effect.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2017
  9. sg jones

    sg jones Member

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    My nipples are made of Rosewood...who want's to touch them?
     
  10. Clifdawg

    Clifdawg Well-Known Member

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    (Flamesuit on)

    Personally, I don't subscribe to the whole "tonewoods" thing. I think they do have an effect on tone, but a very miniscule one, all things considered.

    Which is to say this - I play what feels good. I like the SG because it's mahogany feels good and solid. It doesn't matter to me that the neck on mine is actually maple, despite much hand-wringing by some purists (in fact, I think it's a functional upgrade). Personally, I'd love to see a richlite fingerboard on an SG. That stuff feels great if you haven't ever tried it before, and as much as I love the look of a good cut of rosewood, I'd be perfectly content to shred on richlite.
     
  11. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Which for the topic at hand would be our primary focus, given that this is a guitar site. That doesn't diminish the importance of the other actions, but it's not the topic at hand.

    Totally agree.

    I'm there with you Clif. I view it with nearly the same scepticism as I do "Magic Tone Beans".
    Preach on!
    I don't worry about what other people think about an axe of mine. It's my axe, not theirs.

    As would I. I'd have no hesitation buying an axe with a composite fingerboard if it felt right to me.
    Tradition is all good & wonderful, but the world keeps spinning and more often than some want to accept, it becomes clear that you've got to innovate to survive.
     
  12. Gibbo SG

    Gibbo SG Active Member

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    There are machined-aluminum Telecasters in the high-end marketplace, and these are serious guitars that are not described as "metallic"-sounding. Many find these instruments to be, just out of this world.
     
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  13. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    There have been Lexan guitars for quite some time as well. Rainsong makes excellent carbon fiber acoustic guitars - an area where "tradition" tells us that "tonewoods" are more important than anything.
     
  14. Clifdawg

    Clifdawg Well-Known Member

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    I've often wondered what those carbon fiber guitars sound like. I will say however that I do prefer cedar tops on acoustic guitars, as there is a demonstrable difference in tone, I presume from the softness of the wood.

    Hmm... If I had the dough, I'd make a neck partially out of basswood or poplar and encase it in carbon fiber, and put a richlite fingerboard on it. It would be strong, extremely resilient to humidity and temperature changes, and extremely light. Bolt it to a thin mahogany or alder body and it would be an incredibly balanced guitar... Any venture capitalists out there?
     
  15. SG standard

    SG standard Well-Known Member

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    They did use it on the SG Supreme last year. I tried one & liked the look & feel of it (quite a lot like ebony), but couldn't deal with the nibs!

    I had a carbon fibre electric in the 80s - a Bond Electraglide. Didn't even have frets, instead the fingerboard was 'stepped' in a kind of sawtooth way. I believe the wear on this has been one of the longer-term issues with these, as they were only in production for a very short time. Despite that, they were used by a few well known guitarists at the time. Obviously it felt quite distinctive, but to me it didn't sound at all strange - in fact it was really versatile, with 3 pickups that could be selected as in or out of phase. I probably would've kept it, but I needed a back-up Strat for gigs & had to trade due to being broke! Thus I didn't have it for long...

    More recently I remember hearing about a guy in France who'd done a lot of research into the characteristics of wood, and produced a composite that was claimed to be superior to any 'tonewood' due to it's consistency. Can't recall the name, but they were pricey guitars...

    I'm all for innovation & new materials in guitar construction. This video by Bob Taylor is worth watching, for anyone who hasn't seen it.
     
  16. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Ugh! Nibs strike again!
    Was it like a billiard ball in hardness? If so, that could be quite good as opposed to a laminate such as Richlite in an application like a stepped Bond.
    Likewise! Mr. Taylor seems quite pragmatic.
     

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