Covers better than the original

Discussion in 'General Music' started by Steve D, Jun 9, 2019.

  1. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    Once again, you miss the point of the song and the point of a civil rights movement.

    People of color, women were not given respect simply because they were people of color or women. They were viewed as second class citizens, not equal to others in society. And you think every woman and every person of color should have to go out and do something to earn your resect. Wow. Let me ask you: what exactly did you do to earn respect and basic civil rights? I'd love to hear that.
     
  2. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    How much anybody else respects me is none of my business. It is entirely up to them. And I repeat - neither I nor anybody else gets respect by default. Civil rights are an entirely different question.
     
  3. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    It seems like you're both talking about respect on two different levels. NMA is referring to respecting someone's basic human rights, while it seems donepearce is talking about the deeper personal respect that you earn through your actions.

    I agree with both of you, the first can and should be demanded, the second cannot be asked for and must be earned.

    I will say that while Respect as done by Aretha is not a great song taken at face value, her delivery and it's time in history made it more than the sum of its parts.
     
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  4. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    1. Yes, seems we are talking about two different things. But the one we should be talking about is the respect that the song is speaking of -- respect for an individual, respect for that individual's God given right to exist as everybody else exists. Basic civil rights. That's what Aretha was preaching with her version.

    2. Yeah, I agree the song itself I never really dug. But the time of its release and the societal inequities surrounding it make the song a real bombshell.
     
  5. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I think you need to realise that we are speaking from two different countries. We only had slavery very briefly here, and very quickly made it illegal because it was so vile. You, I'm sorry to say, had to be dragged there kicking and screaming. And many people from your deep south still speak and act as if it were a normal thing. So had they lived over here, neither Otis nor Aretha would have sung that song. It would have made no sense.

    As for rights, talking about them being god-given is a large part of the problem. Things that don't exist are notoriously poor at giving people anything. That's why it had to wait until secularism happened before you could start to tackle the biblically-mandated and justified problem of denied rights.

    So all-in-all, your definition of respect has very little meaning this side of the pond. We wouldn't use the word that way. For us it is an acknowledgement of a particular quality. The other meaning is simply normal life. My feeling is that this is a sign of a kinder society.
     
  6. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    donepearce, aren't you from a land in which the people are considered subjects? Just saying.

    Come on, we are here to talk music. "Respect," regardless of your definition of the word, is the greatest cover ever. It took a simple silly song and became an anthem for human dignity.
     
  7. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I live in a parliamentary democracy, where law comes from two elected chambers. The monarch is nothing more than a face to put on stamps. You, currently live in a country in which the president has usurped the role of emperor, and apparently does what he pleases. You have a corrupt paramilitary police that frequently acts as judge, jury and executioner. And even where law does apply it is arbitrary and ridiculous. Your three-strikes-and-out system means that there is currently a man serving 25 years for stealing a few blank CDs. The result of this system is that one percent of your population is in jail. That is double the next highest country - South Africa. You have more young black men in jail than in college.

    Anthems to human dignity are only needed where there is none. I will stick happily with my definition, thank you, and consider that song nothing more than an indictment of a foreign police state.
     
  8. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    I didn't even know there was another version of Green Manalishi, I thought it was Judas Priest all the way. Will have to seek it out now, just to see where it came from!
     
  9. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I like the modern version too but I felt the stuff about locals in bars calling you a girl for having long hair fit better in the 70s.
     
  10. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Hendrix' All Along The Watchtower is amazing and took a pedestrian Dylan song and made it iconic of an era. It's not uncommon for others to take a Dylan song and do it better. "Hey Mr. Tambourine Man" is a better Dylan song that "All Along the Watchtower" was but William Shatners version of "Tambourine man" was still so much bett... just kidding! :smile:
     
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  11. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    I'm with you on better living through heavy guitars. The Eurythmics were never my thing, I was a teen in the 80s and into classic rock (Zeppelin, Floyd, Sabbath, Hendrix) with a healthy dose of hair metal (Judas Priest, Def Leppard before they became pop singers, etc) and a little college stuff tossed in for flavor (REM, early U2, etc). But the Eurythmics just never did it for me. Some good songs, just didn't like the execution.
     
  12. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    I love Aretha, great stuff. Not ready to declare the thread "won" yet though!
     
  13. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    GnR "Knockin on Heaven's Door" - :thumb:
    Beatles "Twist and Shout" - :cheers:

    Oingo Boingos "I am the walrus" - :shock:
     
  14. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    A very rare case of a Beatles song being better as a cover. I have XM radio in my car and I'm a giant Beatles fan so I often tune into the Beatles station. They play a lot of covers of Beatles songs by really top artists of the 60s and 70s and they are almost all just god awful. But Joe Cocker killed it when he tried!
     
  15. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Here's a schmaltzy one but Badfingers "Without You" sung by Harry Nillson went to another place. It's not "All Along the Watchtower" but he definitely transformed the song, and it became I think the most covered song of all time (I mean cover versions on records, not in bars).
     
  16. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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  17. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I'm very happy to give light-hearted back-and-forth with anyone. But when someone comes at me with some snotty comment about being a subject, they are going to get both barrels.
     
  18. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    I'd almost forgotten about this one, it's from a Kiss tribute album from a few years back.

     
  19. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Active Member

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    My votes:

    and


    Now, on to a previous listing...
    I've got to respectfully disagree. Let's work with the version on So What? Between guitar tone (on an ES-335 with sections using a wah pedal), attitude, voice, and production value, I'd give it to Joe. I've also seen him do it live twice, and what he does with it creatively is also superior, IMHO. But you know what people say about opinions... :D But maybe this will help:


    Bob
     
  20. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    I like Bette Midler's version of "Beast of Burden"
     

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