Custom SG with oversized body has it been done?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Maiden88, Feb 12, 2019.

  1. Maiden88

    Maiden88 New Member

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    im ordering a custom built SG FROM A LUTHIER but I have os idea of having the body scaled up a big body with a 24.75 neck scale length
    I haven’t been able to find anyboversided builds especially for SG OR REALLY ANYTHING THAT ISNT A BARITONE
    Any one have any pics or direction they can point me in the right direction?
    I want the body to be bigger than a bass SG
    Probably 20-25% scaled up please help a new comer with some info
    Thanks

    Up the irons!
     

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  2. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    This does NOT sound like a good idea to me...

    You'll end up paying a lot of money for an unplayable guitar that
    you can't sell, once you realize that it's a big mistake.

    Hang it on the wall, I suppose... and call it art. People pay a lot for wall hangings.
    But I wouldn't do this. Spend your money on a lovely and well designed
    guitar, and then play the hell out of it. Gibson designers know their craft.
    As do Fender designers and other successful instrument makers.
    The SG design is excellent as it is, and doesn't need to be improved
    in my humble opinion. The SG has been proven over many decades to
    be one of the coolest and most comfortable guitars ever made. SG
    tones are on lots of successful recordings, and don't need to be improved
    either.

    If you want a double cut guitar that's bigger than an SG, get an
    ES-335. Another elegant and well designed instrument, time proven,
    and rock an roll approved. Then if you decide that the big body is
    actually more clumsy and clunky than the SG, you can sell it to
    someone else, because of how cool the ES design also is.

    Sorry to sound snarky, I really don't mean it that way... just trying to
    temper your enthusiasm for your own guitar design. If you really want to
    design an electric guitar, you should. But start with your own original
    instrument, not one that's already one of the best.

    Since this forum is full of guys who appreciate the Gibson or Epi SG,
    my response is almost predictable I suppose. Take a look at Sixties
    guitars made by smaller companies that tried to compete with Gibson and Fender. (my faves were Vox, Danelectro, Framus and Mosrite...)
    There were lots of interesting and creative ideas that failed to flower then. Maybe you could give one of them new life, in an oversize form.
     
  3. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

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    This is a bass .
     
  4. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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  5. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    And there's this one.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Satellitedog

    Satellitedog Active Member

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    Plus 25% in size how? Total area of the slab, or length?

    Is it for a better visual balance with the player?

    Consider the added weight, you might want a weight-relieved body.
     
  7. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    Sg’s aren’t heavy to begin with. Weight isn’t going to be a problem.

    There are PLENTY of “boutique” makers doing almost exactly what you’re asking about. Making their own version of an sg, slightly different body outline but a bit larger.

    It should be extremely easy to scale up a photo etc. the only real issue to deal with will be the neck pocket etc.

    You’ll need to locate your bridge posts with your own measurements or by using the “intonation method”.

    No big deal.
     
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  8. Satellitedog

    Satellitedog Active Member

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    Well, but scaling up the body, will it be a uniform resizing? I'm wondering whether the larger body would require some rethinking of the back, say a deeper ribcage chamfer?
    Also the neck joint, does the resizing affect playability in any negative way? Will the body thickness stay the same or will it be proportionally increased?

    Interesting project, will be following.
     
  9. Maiden88

    Maiden88 New Member

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    Well I’m not sure ,
    Its not going to be a Gibson Custom ,I wish I could afford a Gibson Custom but I’m having it built by a great luthier.
    Neckthrough walnut and mahogany still ironing out the details
    Yes I’m doing a Sg just bigger what was the biggest shaped body of the Gibson SG series?
    Was is the 61’?
    Does anyone know the largest model Gibson Sg body released in bulk that was not a bass body or baritone?
     
  10. Maiden88

    Maiden88 New Member

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    I’m thinking a Sg scaled up copy thruneck and the headstock will be a lil different than the original Sg just to not completely rip of the design exactly it of course it will be a custom built 1 of 1
     
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  11. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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  12. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Active Member

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    When I read the thread-title, I thought, "man, an SG is the perfect guitar for my frame." Seeing as how the OP wants a bass and not a guitar, I can see why he'd explore this option, though. It would improve the balance -- which is sketchy on a six-string, some are neck-heavy, some ain't -- and a bass with its longer neck would sure ferfuckle that balance.

    So yeah, a little more surface area, a little deeper slab, and active electronics should help maintain balance on the instrument. Probably help appearances, too -- SG bass bodies always looked tiny to me, with that massive neck strung onto it.
     
  13. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Kind of like a cricket bat attached to a dinner plate.
     
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  14. SG standard

    SG standard Well-Known Member

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    I'm not so sure - a bass with a 24.75 scale length? I think he's after a 6-string with a body bigger than an SG bass.

    Either way, it'll improve the balance. ;)
     
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  15. Jason

    Jason Member

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    Isn't the body of an sg bass the same size as the guitar? I thought they were and just had a longer neck and different bridge placement.
     
  16. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Active Member

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    Well, no matter the body size, a 24.75"-scaled bass isn't going to work. Between the flub issues and the intonation issues, such a thing would essentially be firewood.
     
  17. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    I think you're all misinterpreting him; he said bigger than the size of the SG bass, he never said it IS a bass.

    The SG body has never changed size, with the one exception of the SG-62, which was slightly smaller.

    But if your luthier is good, he should be able to scale up the SG body template to different sizes for you to decide what you want. I would start with the bass body, assuming it is larger as I believe, and go from there. I think you'd be surprised how much difference a small increase makes.

    I believe the bass body is bigger so that it still looks proportional with the longer neck.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
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  18. BoiseSG

    BoiseSG Member

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    John Konesky (guitarist for Tenacious D) has a custom made SG. Not sure if it is scaled up proportionately, but it is much thicker (LP thick). Marty Music did an interview with him. It is pretty cool.



    [​IMG]
     
  19. Ray

    Ray Well-Known Member

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    I believe SGs made from around 1972 to 198X had those slightly wider bodies ..? images(5).jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2019
  20. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    I've heard it said that the body shape was changed with that model, so I compared a '61 Standard to a '72 Deluxe in photoshop.

    61-72.jpg

    The only real difference appears to be the curve in the cutaways (the deeper cutaway is the '72). I suppose that's because the deeper set neck required less meat around the joint. I also compared other SGs from 1969 (same as '61), 1976 (same as '72) and 1984 (same as '72).

    So, as it turns out, the only SG to ever actually change the body shape in any significant way was the SG-62. I suppose the changes in beveling really do a lot to change how your eye perceives the shape. I was fully expecting the Norlins to have a wider waist and longer top horn, because they always looked that way to me.
     
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