Difference between 98 db and 100 db?

Discussion in 'Amps & Cabs' started by Rabelais, Nov 5, 2015.

  1. Rabelais

    Rabelais Member

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    I'm changing my amp's speaker and I'm deciding between two models, one with a sensitivity of 98 db and the other with 100 db. How louder the 100 db speaker is?. 10%, 20%, etc.?.
     
  2. Clifdawg

    Clifdawg Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is that the sensitivity indicates that the same amount of power necessary to produce 98db in one speaker will now produce 100db in another speaker. IIRC, a 10db indicates a doubling of perceived volume, so I think a 2db increase may increase volume by 20% with the power remaining constant. I could be very much wrong, so anyone with more acoustics knowledge, feel free to correct me.

    I do know that speaker sensitivity is a much more effective way of increasing output volume than increasing wattage.
     
  3. Dave_Death

    Dave_Death Well-Known Member

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  4. Madmatt

    Madmatt Active Member

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    2% louder?

    Decibels are logarithmic ratio designed to model how the ear reacts to chages in sound intensity, with 0 as the threshold of hearing.

    So an increse of two decibels would be about a 2 precent increse in loudness (roughly)...
     
  5. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    1dB change is generally considered to be just audible, provided the sounds are played one after the other. With a gap in between, there would be no perceptible difference. 2dB is definitely audible, and could probably be discerned a few hours later. 10dB is roughly speaking a doubling of volume.

    You will hear a major difference though, because the tone balance will be different, and that is always audible. Some tone balances sound louder than others.
     
  6. gball

    gball Well-Known Member

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    I recently switched out a 103db sensitivity speaker for a 98db one. It is noticeable, but not at all dramatic - a nudge of the volume knob, not a turn.
     
  7. Paul G.

    Paul G. Well-Known Member

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    1 dB is perceptible. 2 dB is significantly louder. Definitely noticeable.

    Not earthshaking, but useful.

    Efficient speakers is free power!!!

    P
     
  8. GibsonKramer

    GibsonKramer Active Member

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    WAIT! I KNOW THIS!!!

    "Difference between 98 db and 100 db?"

    2 db
     
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  9. danlad

    danlad Member

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    Assuming the dB measurements are truly comparable and to the same criteria you might notice a difference. It's one of those things I think where because there is a measurable number it can be taken out of context and suddenly becomes really important for marketing. Like watts, car engine size, hypothetical broadband speeds, you name it.

    Lower sensitivity might be better if you are wanting to get your amp pushing harder.
     
  10. bea

    bea Well-Known Member

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    Although 1 dB (~10%) is almost not perceivable as a difference in "loudness", even that one dB might be clearly audible. It might be the difference between cutting through the mix or not. Or being too loud or just right.

    (Or: let a small tube amp come through or not...)

    In speaker combinations a speaker with 2 dB more sensitivity will clearly stand out. Again, even 1 dB is clearly noticeable (run a Deltalite 2515 and a Kappalite 3015 by Eminence in parallel...). And in comparison to these two EVM 15L clones like the Oberton 15L400 are real beasts... again just 2 dB more than the 3015 (and, btw, the only one in this list with a sound suitable for guitar)
     
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  11. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    The human ear can readily distinguish 3db changes in volume.... Less than 3db it's really difficult to definitively tell a difference.

    Two different speakers with different sensitivity ratings (1 or 2 db) are probably skewing different because of tone shifts or different magnet/voice coil etc....more than overall volume levels. At least that's what auditory research will tell you.

    Guitar speakers could live outside that realm. They are kind of magical.
     
  12. bea

    bea Well-Known Member

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    Mhmm, as i did already say: differences in volume are one thing. And indeed 3 dB are hardly noticeable as a difference.

    But for the difference in speakers: i did the test and attached my speakers pairwise to the amp. Several combinations (the list of 15s above + an Emi Beta 12, an Emi Beta 10 and a Fane TC100. All sounding differently, and always the one with the larger sensitivity dominated. It did not matter if the cabs were side by side or on top of each other. It were clearly the differences in volume level, and these were between 1 and 3 dB
    (i usually take the value computed from the TSC parameters as a reference because i find these are more trustable and more relevant to bass playing then the published values which occasionally seem like dreamt by the marketing people)
     

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