Epi SG weight

Discussion in 'Epiphone SG' started by TChalms, May 30, 2020.

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  1. TChalms

    TChalms New Member

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    How much do your Epi SG's weigh?

    I've read how some SG's are really light. Mine seems heavy to me. I can't weigh it very accurately, but by weighing myself, then adding the SG, it adds 8 pounds.

    What's the average weight?

    Cheers,
    TC
     
  2. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Usually between 6 and 7 pounds. Mine are 6.3 and 6.4.
    8 is heavy for a SG. I once had one and sold it because of that.
     
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  3. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    misslizziesm.jpg
    My 2005 Ebony deluxe weighs 7 lb. 10 .oz
    g400vert.jpg
    The 2003 SG Vintage weighs 6 lb. 12 oz.
    Specs.jpg
    For comparison my Gibson SG Specials weighs 6 lb. 10 oz. and 6 lb. 10 1/2 oz. respectively
    SGclsc.jpg
    This modified Gibson SG Classic weighs 8 lb.s even.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2020
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  4. fredlw

    fredlw New Member

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  5. TChalms

    TChalms New Member

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    Aha! Thanks for that link. It looks like mine is on the heavy side, but not out of the ballpark completely.

    It makes sense to me that the different woods used in building a guitar will make a difference in both the weight of the guitar and the basic tone of the wood. Of course, the tone will be affected by the strings, pickups, sound chain, and the players hands.

    Is there a list or chart somewhere of the various woods and their relative weight and the basic tone produced by each? I'm on the nerd side of life, so I'm thinking of something like:
    __________Relative Weight___Basic tone of the wood
    Alder_______I don't know_____I don't know
    Ash________I don't know_____I don't know
    Mahogany___I don't know_____I don't know
    etc.

    Sometimes my curiosity takes me into nerd-land.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2020
  6. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget Meranti, Birch, Basswood, Paulonia, Pine, Cedar...ad nauseam ad infinitum.
    A friend recently made a Telecaster from a composite shed door and a reclaimed 2X4. Resonates like a champ and is rock solid.
     
  7. TChalms

    TChalms New Member

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    Yeah, I think it would be interesting to learn the relative weight of the various woods and whether the tone is heavy or light or whatever. I would think that heavy, dense woods would sound darker, but maybe not. I don't know yet.
     
  8. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    The deal is that a tree, let's say a cedar tree, has different densities and tensile strengths in different parts of the same single tree. A 3" thick plank from the top ten feet will feel, sound and weigh very different from the bottom ten feet. There is no consistency by species, at all.
     
  9. Von Trapp

    Von Trapp Well-Known Member

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    I'm afraid that, if you look at how an electric guitar works, then no, apart from the weight it doesn't make sense. Here's your table though: https://cedarstripkayak.wordpress.com/lumber-selection/162-2/
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2020
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