First SG, 1966 G-400 PRO cherry, couldn't be much happier

Discussion in 'Epiphone SG' started by Beery Swine, Jul 14, 2018.

  1. Beery Swine

    Beery Swine New Member

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    Great guitar, LOVE the pickups (surprisingly), just changed a few things to my liking. Lowered the bridge just a bit for action about 1-2mm lower, idk, I just eyeball and feel it. When it's too high, you can feel it. When it's too low, you can feel and hear it. Raised the pickups as well, because while I wanted a more vintagey tone than my other guitars, I still like gain. The neck was already aligned nicely, no buzz, great intonation along all frets and strings. I ordered it new online, and it's 2018 model, so no need to change old strings yet. My only complaint is the fretboard is a bit dirty up to about the first 4 or 5 frets. Can't really tell when I'm just normal fretting, but on riffs with a lot of sliding, it very quickly becomes apparent, and with dirty fingers comes more friction and dirtier strings, which in turn create more friction. I'll just have to clean the board when I change the strings. Easily forgivable for the price and tone imo. There are just a couple other minor flaws which I don't really care about, like a couple of the higher frets you can ever so slightly feel on the finger side of the neck, and the nut flush with the neck, it's slightly indented, but the grooves seem to be well aligned.

    WOO, boi, is it just me or do these alnico pro w/e epi pups sound like '57 Classics?
    Okay, bit of personal history. I play mostly metal. Talkin Metallica, Slayer, Megadeth, Morbid Angel, Death, At the Gates, etc. Heavy, loud, obnoxious, too-distorted-to-make-anything-out stuff, BUT I've been playing progressively more and more hard rock, classic rock, soft rock etc. the past few years, and have been wanting to learn blues, altho it's very complex and mostly outside my skill level, so I decided I needed a guitar better suited to the genres with less gainy pups. For example, SD Distortions can easily get good AC/DC tone with the right amp/pedal/settings, but it usually sounds just a bit too modern. So, went with the cheaper Epi over Gibson, based on forum discussions, words by guys like Rob Chapman, and those nice push/pull volumes. Boy, am I glad I did. I've played an Epi LP Tribute with '57s for a few hours at the local shop and was surprised at how well they handled heavy metal distortion. Was not expecting such sweet-toned pups to have such growl at high gain and extreme EQ settings. I swear to God, that's the same feeling I got from these. Whether clean, crunch, or super gain, all I could think of when I first plugged in was "'57 Classics?" Even now, I still can't get over both how well they clean up yet how much punch they pack without even changing any amp settings. I was expecting to think they were just "okay", or maybe a little better than "okay", but damned if I ever swap them out for anything.

    I do have a few questions concerning G-400s, but I'm not sure if I should ask them here, search for answers, or start a new thread.
     
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  2. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Great intro thread Beery and welcome to the zoo. G400 are way underestimated in my book, but that's OK, so for us in the know, they stay reasonnably priced. Well set-upped, they can rival any other guitar. Glad you found yours.

    But if you want us to really believe you, we HAVE to see it :)
     
  3. Roca

    Roca Active Member

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    They are great guitars! I love mine!
     
  4. Beery Swine

    Beery Swine New Member

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    Crappy phone because I hate modern phones. You can see the dark areas in the fretboard, those are where it needs to be cleaned. Probably needs some lemon juice as well, but I've never done that. Just what I hear makes it look better, idk. I'm also trying to get a friend to shoop the colors so they look better and contrast more, maybe brighten it up.
    Muh epi SG.jpg
     
  5. Beery Swine

    Beery Swine New Member

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    Here's a slightly cleaned up version of the first pic, plus the same kind of clean up of a body close-up. Muh epi SG 1.jpg Muh epi SG body.jpg
     
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  6. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    Do a search first, heaps of info about the G400 on here. If you don't find what you need then start a new thread.
     
  7. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Even a crappy phone will take better pictures outside in natural light.
     
  8. Beery Swine

    Beery Swine New Member

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    Thanks, I found what I was looking for, and what I suspected to be the case was correct. The G-400 cherry has a mahogany veneer over multi-piece body. If I didn't know about Epiphones, veneers, or prices and someone just handed me mine, I don't think I'd be able to tell the difference, which probably says more about my discernment than it does about the quality.
    It's funny, I have a neckthru guitar with solid mahogany wings and I'm not sure what makes it sound different than my other more midranged guitars. It could be the ebony fretboard, the unique neck construction, the body wood, or all or some of those combined. Even unplugged it just feels different playing, like the guitar is punching back slightly from each string sounded. I can feel it clearly distinct from my others.
     
  9. dub-setter

    dub-setter Active Member

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    that s a good sign,
    i also realised this on my epi custom.
    very resonant and open sounding when played unplugged....:cheers:



    btw.. seems your fretboard is a bit dryed out in certain areas,
    i also did the lemon oil procedure on mine...
    no big deal.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2018
  10. Daniel.S

    Daniel.S Active Member

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    Nice guitar!
    I use daddario hydrate fingerboard conditioner.
    (It works really nice as a cleaner).
    I then get another rag and clean it up with water so there’s no funky chemicals left on it. (Makes it less sticky feeling).
     
  11. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Epiphone guitars seem to be getting better and better IMHO.
    I own two now, and love them both for different reasons.
    I don't have a G 400, but lots of our members do.

    Both of my Epis have been modded to the nines, but they were both
    quite serviceable stock, and their pickups sounded excellent to me without
    any changes. So they didn't absolutely NEED to be modded, I just did it
    because of how my feelings grew.
    Epiphones 2018@100.jpg
    Both of these instruments have great tone and feel. Both of them were well made
    and do not seem like Epiphone's old (obsolete) image of cheap guitars. I bought the white Wilshire used, found her hanging in my local Music-Go-Round looking like a college girl sitting in the drunk tank with a bunch of hookers, after a hard night
    maybe. I took her home, and she plays like a dream. She's a lot tougher than she
    looks. She weighs about 7 pounds.

    The ES-339 P-90 pro I bought new, after playing one at a GC. I thought I was going to get an Epi Casino Coupe, but the ES-339 was a hundred bucks less and
    plays and sounds great. The ES-339 has a solid center block, so it's basically an
    electric guitar with hollow wings above and below. Not much acoustic sound.
    But she weighs 8 pounds and balances perfectly, and I find myself loving the P-90
    tone, even though it harkens back to like 1945. Those p'ups have never been
    surpassed, IMHO anyway. Clear as a bell, or rough and gritty, just turn the knobs.

    I have no idea what wood my Wilshire is made of, and I don't care. She sounds great, so whatever wood it is, or how many pieces, or if it's plywood laminations, none of that matters at all. Some guys go nuts over those issues, but my Wilshire (and most G-400s) are proof that it's all blowing smoke. Wood is like, not magnetic. *grins

    My Stepdaughter's Epi Les Paul Special ll is another one that proves this. It's got a pair of Gibson 490 p'ups out of my SG, has had its bridge, nut and wiring replaced with good parts. It sounds excellent in spite of its plywood body and bolt on neck. And it feels great to play. Go figure.

    Your Epiphone looks like a real player, I believe that Epi guitars respond very well to setup and tweaking. I now know that new Epiphones have some kind of blacking on the fretboard. It comes off on your hands when you play. I found this to be true with my ES-339. But I like it so well that I just played it anyway, and got dirty. *grins

    When I changed the strings, I treated the fretboard with lemon oil first, which doesn't do much for the wood but it cleans off grime. A lot of that blacking came off when I did that.

    Then I treated the fretboard with Fret Doctor before installing new strings.
    That seals the wood and darkens it in a lovely way. One treatment a year is
    plenty, so one little bottle of Fret Doctor lasts a long time. There's also Music Nomad's F1, which is a fine fretboard conditioner.

    Welcome to ETSG, and congratulations on an excellent choice of guitar.
    Hetfield plays an SG sometimes.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
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  12. UTGrad

    UTGrad New Member

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    I have the 1966 also. Anyone found the neck profile on the 1966 to be on the chunky side?
     
  13. Daniel.S

    Daniel.S Active Member

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    It’s supposed to be.
     
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  14. sgpenguin

    sgpenguin Member

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    My standard G400 Pro resonates beautifully unplugged, you can feel the resonance hit you in the chest.
     
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  15. Beery Swine

    Beery Swine New Member

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    Yes, and that's a GOOD thing to me. I didn't realize it till just a week ago, but one of the reasons I like playing the G400 so much (apart from being my newest guitar) is the neck feel. I'm 6'2", fairly proportional hands, so the larger neck seems to suit me better than my thinner and narrower necked guitars. Size is also why this is the first 24 3/4 guitar I bought, I thought the shorter scale would be too uncomfortable, but I barely notice that.
    If I ever get a custom spec guitar, I'll have to remember I like thicker necks.
     
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  16. Namelyguitar

    Namelyguitar New Member

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    The SlimTaper™ “D” that the G-400 and G-400 Pro have in common is chunky - although not like a baseball bat.

    I like really like it!
     
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