For you theory buffs.....name that chord

Discussion in 'Lessons & Techniques' started by living room rocker, Dec 7, 2019.

  1. living room rocker

    living room rocker Active Member

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    Been watching Frampton play Baby I Love Your Way. The second chord in his intro is shaped like this.....he mutes the 6th string, frets the 5th string @ #9, mutes the 4th string, let's the 3rd string ring open, frets the 2nd string @ #10, and mutes the 1st string. This produces a triad with the notes F#, G, and A. Technically, what chord would this be? I'm not good at this, that's why I run through these exercises.
     
  2. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    I've got an app on my phone for this stuff called Smartchord, it's pretty good and has lots of features, plus it's free.

    According to it, that chord is a F#mb9
     
  3. living room rocker

    living room rocker Active Member

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    Thank you plankton, I'll check that out.
     
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  4. Astral Traveler

    Astral Traveler Active Member

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    An inversion of F#mb9 I think. Thechnically, the G at the open 3rd string would be the b2 which is the same as the b9 but an octave lower. The A on the 10th of the 2nd string is the minor third but an octave higher than you'd otherwise play it. A straight up 1st inversion F#mb9 should be 9th fret at 5th string, 7th fret at 4th string and 8th at second string.

    To make a full chord rather than just a triad you'd add the perfect fifth at the 6th fret of the 3rd string in the first inversion or the 11th fret of the 4th string in your inversion above. As an alternative to the 11th fret at the 4th string you could use the 9th fret at either the 6th or 1st string but those would alter the sound quite a lot I think...

    Edit: I don't have a guitar nearby to try but adfing the perfect 5th should make the chord even more dissonant as the b2 or b9 forms a tritone with the perfect fifth. Engage the fuzz pedal and try it :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019

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