Gibson bridge on Epiphone G-400 (weird method)

Discussion in 'Epiphone SG' started by Wigjuice, May 6, 2019.

  1. Wigjuice

    Wigjuice Member

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    Hi all! This is my first post here. This community has been great, I must say. Maybe this can help some others out there...or maybe it's a really stupid idea. So far, it's working great. I know there's a million posts out there regarding upgrading an Epiphone SG with Gibson parts, but I've yet to see any that mention what I wound up doing, so I wanted to share it.

    After a long time searching for ways to do this, I was about to give in and buy the way overpriced conversion posts. Then, a few days ago I pulled out the bushings on my G-400 to see how bad the fit would be for the Gibson bushings. Of course they were massively too small, so the only way to do that would be to fill in the holes completely and drill out new ones. I was thinking about doing this, but figured it'd wind up being easier in the long run to just get conversion posts...

    THEN, all the sudden it dawned on me...would the Gibson bushings fit inside the Epiphone bushings? Being careful, I inserted one in there, which left about 1-2mm of a gap. It wouldn't work that way of course, so I grabbed my fret hammer and lightly tapped it for a little bit, pushing it all the way inside the other bushing. And tight! That thing is likely never coming out.

    I proceeded to put everything back together after that and wouldn't ya know...it works great! The Gibson bridge is far superior (obviously) and I am incredibly pleased. I also installed a full face pickguard about the same time, so you can't even see that there are two bushing rims under the bridge. Mostly couldn't see it anyway, unless looking really closely, but that hid it much better. For the Gibson tailpiece I just slid it onto the Epiphone posts, which fit just fine.

    I can't see any downside to this method, so far. The sustain is actually better than before, so that didn't suffer. It stays in tune great, plays great, sounds great, looks great! I'd love to hear some thoughts from others out there, good or bad. And if I helped anyone, that'll make my day.

    Sorry for the long post! Thanks for reading!
    20190506_111528.jpg 20190506_111536.jpg 20190506_111545.jpg
     
  2. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    Cool first post, thanks for the tip. I put a Gotoh bridge on my G400, but if I ever need to upgrade again I'll keep this in mind.

    Welcome to the forum.
     
  3. GraphX12

    GraphX12 Member

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    Thanks for the tip. Makes sense ... if you have a Gibson bridge lying around. I replaced my bridge with a $45 TonePros that dropped right over the Epiphone posts. No need to mess with any post mods.
     
  4. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Was going to say, the Epiphone posts are quite a lot better than the Gibson ones. Yours would seem to be the way to do this. If I really wanted to fit a Gibson bridge I would just drill out the holes to accept the Epiphone posts.
     
  5. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Elegant solution.

    The bass side of that bridge seem to be at its lowest adjustment, sitting right on the bushing. :hmm: Was that pure luck or did you carefully measure that out beforehand ?
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2019
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  6. dub-setter

    dub-setter Well-Known Member

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    not bad....
    never heard about this workaround...:smile:
     
  7. Bill Moore

    Bill Moore Member

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    Seems to be an inexpensive way to go!
    I initially considered conversion thread inserts, but went with the Epi to Gibson posts.
     
  8. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    Nice guitar, good job.
     
  9. Wigjuice

    Wigjuice Member

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    Thanks for all the replies everyone! I have to change my notification settings since I didn't get any notice that anyone had replied, until I l got back on here. But what a pleasant surprise! I did a lot of searching before making this post and have never seen this solution used before, so I'm happy to hear that it may be a new concept, to some degree. It's probably not the ideal way to go, but it's working great! Oh the fun of playing with guitars!!

    I did have an extra Gibson bridge and tailpiece, which is why I chose to try and use it. I have a Gibson Les Paul studio that I've been changing out all the hardware to gold, so wanted to make use of any extra parts. I have always thought it was weird that the Gibson posts are so small compared to the import posts. They don't seem as sturdy at all. However, I've never had any problem with the small ones, and they keep making them that way, so they must be alright. Right? :-D

    As for the bass side posts being all the way down...they actually aren't! There is still a small amount of adjustment left. It's hard to tell in the picture, especially with that thick 5-ply pickguard. The action is nice and low so I wouldn't ever need to go lower anyway. That was a big concern when I tried this method but it's worked out quite well.
     
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  10. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations on a very creative idea. I don't like good guitar
    parts sitting about in boxes, it's better to put them to work.

    IMHO the bridge is one of the weak points on an Epiphone guitar.
    And that's fine, because we buy Epis in part for the prices.
    A guy can buy an Epiphone that will work fine and play music as issued.
    And then he can "improve" it a little at a time, as he can afford it.
    A new bridge can improve tone and intonation, and is a good idea
    IMHO of course.

    I bought my Epi ES-339 P-90 pro because I'd been drooling over the
    Gibson version for several years, and then saw M/F mark the Epiphone
    down... and I couldn't resist.

    For me, the object of the game was to install better parts than the stock
    issue, but not to spend more than the guitar cost. So I bought a Gotoh
    bridge, and it fit right in the Epiphone bushings with no trouble.

    It's stupid that US. guitars are measured in inches and fractions thereof,
    and everybody else's guitars are measured in millimeters or centimeters.

    I learned the metric system when I was about 14 years old. Eighth grade
    science or something. As soon as I learned it, I said, "This is great! I'm
    not going to measure fractions of an inch any more..." I've been using
    it ever since.

    For me one of the stupidest things about our culture in the USA is that
    we cling to the system of measurement based on body parts of some bloody
    English King. Why? The inch was the width of some King's thumb, the
    yard was the length of the King's Arrow.

    There is actually no excuse for this. I think we should have
    another unit of measurement, based on another royal body part. It should
    be called "the Putz" and it would be about 127mm.

    Building trades guys oppose changing to metric
    because they are very traditional minded and they can't accept anything
    other than they way they were trained. Society of Auto Engineers opposed
    it, claiming that it would cost billions to switch the US manufacturing over
    to metric. Hah...

    What that meant was that when I got a bit older, I had to buy two sets of
    tools to work on my car. Inch tools and metric...I thought that was extremely stupid... and I still think so. The builders supposedly saved a lot, and we had to spend more. I'm still pissed about it, as you can tell...

    Anyway, your brilliant solution to fitting Gibson parts into a metric
    instrument is worthy of some kinda prize. You just hammer it!
    Who woulda thunk it?
     
    Bill Moore likes this.
  11. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

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  12. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    As an American now living in Australia for over a decade, I can confirm that the Metric system is indeed much better.
     
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  13. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    I have to work with both SAE and Metric daily and favor the Metric System as well. Using a base 10 measuring system is so much easier to work with IMO.

    When I worked in another industry in the past, it was often necessary to convert hexadecimal to binary on a daily basis.

    Sometimes the PCI Bus would hydroplane over the Solder Bridge.

    There are 10 types of people. Those who understand binary and those who do not.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
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  14. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    There's nothing to stop you using base ten in inches. The problem is not the base unit, but the insistence on working in fractions.
     
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  15. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Always kills me when someone gives measures like 8/64th ... can't do 1/8th ?

    Talking about differences. I would have thought that a Gibson bridge (and tail piece) post spacings would be different enough, to not fit on an Epiphone.
     
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  16. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Yup. I know you can buy wood that is four quarters thick. What? Not too sure about the post spacings of Epiphone and Gibson. Well, I've looked on Google, and found about five different spacings on drawings for Gibsons, but none for Epiphone. So I've measured my guitars. I reckon the Epiphone is 73mm and Gibson is 74mm. So with a bit of slack, they might go together - but their eyes will be watering.
     
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  17. Wigjuice

    Wigjuice Member

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    I'll chime in some more later when I've got more time, but wanted to say really quick:

    The Gibson bridge fit exactly on the posts after I'd hammered them in. It can be raised and lowered with no issue at all. I figured there'd be a discrepancy also. The string spacing is very very slightly different, but hasn't been a problem at all either. The benefits far exceed any issues.

    I agree, metric is way better. More precise and far less confusing.

    Also, you all are an awesome community!
     
  18. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    That is correct.
    I should not have used the term "base 10". Both Metric and Imperial use the base 10 numbering system.

    I have used measuring tapes with engineer's scale using increments of 10ths and 100ths of a foot instead of 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64 of an inch.

    The difference between Metric and Imperial measuring systems is really in the units of measurements. I have no issues using either system or converting from one unit of measurement to another between each system or within the same system. Some folks may argue that one is more accurate than the other, but probably don't understand the difference between the terms "accuracy" and "precision".

    Using fractions or decimals makes no difference to me.

    I think some folks just don't like math.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
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  19. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps they don't understand the concept of reducing fractions to lowest terms.
     
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  20. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Did you know that metrication was passed into US law long ago? And of course your system is based on the standard metre - it doesn't stand on its own. It's just plain orneryness that is stopping it happening. Even your Imperial colleagues, Myanmar and Liberia are metric in fact, if not in law. It's really only you chaps still standing outside the door.
     
    cerebral gasket likes this.

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