Gibson SG Tribute Future???

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by thembelly, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. thembelly

    thembelly New Member

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    has any one played one they seem interesting but i cant get my head around ordering one without playing it or even reading a review. i have played for i guess maybe 6 years on ibanez rg 4ex1(i think thats the model) i hate the edge trem. pain in the balls. so time to change guitar not into upgrading it. im just looking for some info i can seem to dig any up but the specs. and i dont even really understand them. or info if i should get another guitar. i have 1000 bones. i didn't sell/trade in guitar and amps yet either. i have a line 6 spider 75 should i upgrade.
     
  2. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    I like this one:
    Gibson SG Tribute '60s (2013, Vintage Sunburst) | Sweetwater.com

    seems like you get a lot for $900... sweetwater is cool because they don't charge sales tax or shipping. M/F might have some kinda discount available, but this looks like a fine guitar. 24 frets too, unlike older models.

    I know Ibanez makes good guitars, but I'm thinking if this is your first SG you will be delighted. I love my SG, even though I have other fine guitars I play, my SG is the Queen of the music room... sounds better and feels better than anything I have ever played.

    I hope what ever you decide to get has the same effect on you. But I agree with you, you should go to a store and play one. Don't order anything blind IMHO. the best way to get an SG is to go to a store where they have a number of them, and find the one that sounds and feels the best. That's what I did, and it's four years later and I'm still in love with this individual instrument. good luck.
     
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  3. nbeersiii

    nbeersiii Well-Known Member

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    gotta tell ya man Im not digging the 2013s. I dont know what makes a 24 fret vintage burst SG with no pickguard a 60s tribute. I dont know why they are 24 fretting everything. Im sure they are trying to grab all the shreddy kreugers out there but they are really pigion hole themselves if you ask me. Oh well I guess there are plenty of older models to be had but I dont understand where gibson gets their ideas from sometimes. I talked to the gibson rep at GC one day and asked why they are pushing this robot BS again when it failed the first time and the fireturd X. he said they were trying to market towards the studio musician more than the average joe. Didnt make since to me but I guess Im just old fashioned. Thats why I went with the tried and true SG Classic.
     
  4. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    OMG UNderStatement


    Nbeers, this is the understatement of the decade regarding pigeon holing, gibson ideas, robot bs, and avg joe shafting. I am very old fashioned in tried and true bread and butter meat and potatoes equipment. Bells and whistles, new and improved and the latest thing seldom tickle my fancy. Reliable and well made are the benchmarks I put my money into.
     
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  5. nbeersiii

    nbeersiii Well-Known Member

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    I agree. I can understand them making one or two models for the studio guys but to pretty much say we dont give a rats ass about what the majority of our customers want just blows my mind. I used to like the zebra coil pickups until GC started ordering ever gibson with them and coil split. To me the coil split dont sound like a strat or a good single coil at all it just makes the guitar less loud. I have an Epi custom I put a SD P-rail in. The p90 position and humbucker position sound ok but the single coil position is just more quiet and not strat sounding wich is the sound I think of when I want single coil tones. I know its not a perfect world but Gibson should keep making certain guitars instead of discontinuing them and pushing crap no one really wants.
     
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  6. Heket

    Heket Well-Known Member

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    I'm probably treading on thin ice here!

    The new generation is one where technology isn't just a postscript or an attachment but it is integrated seamlessly into every day life. I myself am halfway there, although I'm a little bit older than what I would call the 'new' generation. Even though I like simple and classic, I find myself GASing over Line 6 Variax guitars and Orange PC amps and the latest new software for writing and composing music.

    Whilst I would hate the bare bones basic guitars to go completely out of fashion, I can see that this new, flashy techy stuff is what is really going to sell in the future. The same goes for practically everything you can think of - cars, kitchen gadgets, golf clubs (probably :p), the list is endless.

    I can't say I'm overly thrilled about it, but I am intrigued and would probably be won over eventually.
     
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  7. nbeersiii

    nbeersiii Well-Known Member

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    Without all the gadgets on the guitars kids are forced to learn to play them instead of using it as a werid noise maker. like i said I can see making one or two gadget filled guitars but not the whole 2013 line up. Wich I know isnt totaly the case but they are putting the new robot tunner technology on ALOT of the new guitars. The guitar is an instrument that you make music by using chords and scales and skill like every other instrument. If you want to make techno or dubstep crap get a synth. I know I sound like a cratchety old man saying that but some things should be left sacred.
     
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  8. Kevy Nova

    Kevy Nova Well-Known Member

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    Example, they put robo-tuners on the new 50s and 60s "tribute" models. WTF is that all about?!?
     
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  9. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    this is one of the reasons I was soooooo tempted by the marked down 'old' models. I just had a feeling they were getting rid of the 20th century at a discount, and getting ready to change everything.

    my mind is also open on the subject of new ways to make music, because i think the young people will make music their own way no matter what guys like me might think or say. That's why I found a new Gibson or two that i feel I could play to advantage, if I had the money and/or really needed a new one.

    But I'm happy with the fine instruments I already have, and like others have posted, I'm putting my energy into my technique, and into a new recording, and into writing new songs. And I can do all that with my old guitars, some of which are not that old.

    What I think is the problem with all the "new technology" is that it's likely to be obsolete in a couple of years. I hang out on the Martin guitar forum with the acoustic snobs (*snorts) and that seems to be the consensus over there. You can pay $3000 for a fine D-28 Herringbone with the latest electronics installed, and in a few years they come up with a new development and you have to hang your head because your technology isn't cutting edge any more. *shrugs

    That applies to electric guitars too, if they are touted as being the latest and coolest new robot that shines itself and your shoes at the same time (even if you're wearing sneakers...) and changes its own strings (and the baby, and yer car's oil) simultaneously. It's only cool until they come up with the Next Big Thing.

    But that SG Standard they marked down to $799 is a solid deal on a solid guitar that will always be just what you bought: The SG Standard, classic design, road proven, straightforward and built to outlive you. No batteries, no LEDs, no software, no forty page book you have to wade through (written by half literate Far East engineer nerds). Just plug it in and rock. Buy a pedal to color your sound for fun, but you don't have to.

    There's a powerful appeal to that, isn't there my brothers? By the time guitarists are 'won over' to the new technology, it will be time to 're-issue' the Classic and the Faded Special, and the 'Old Standard." *Laughs...
    You know they will...
     
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  10. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    New not always bad but


    Having read this, I am decently capable of handling MOST technology. But have also worked on cars, houses, motorcycles appliances and many other man made stuff. I have found that it is a pipe dream to say technology is seamlessly assimilated by youth as it permeates everyday items we use.

    For example, these new front load washers get mildewy odors unless we take special measures to preemptively avoid this. Give me the old top loader any day. Disposable dvd players, touch pad dishwashers, stoves, microwaves etc. Junk in my opinion. How many times do these fail after hardly any use or years of service. I prefer manual dials and pull knobs any day. Cars and trucks, While replacement parts become more scarce and other age factors, I'll still take a good 60's -70's Truck or car over 80's thru 2000's any day in terms of low cost of maintenance and user servicable (cheap) repairs any day.

    Now good technology like internet, you tube, digi cams, flat screen tv's I am all for. Just to F up a well functioning Tool with gizmos that fail and cause expensive ramifications. Kevy said it well, Example, they put robo-tuners on the new 50s and 60s "tribute" models. WTF is that all about?!?
     
  11. Saintjonah

    Saintjonah Well-Known Member

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    I completely agree with what you're getting at. Just a bunch of fancy ways to turn a knob or push a button. Is it really so hard to turn the dial on a dishwasher? Is it really so hard to tune a damn guitar? Can't they just use pedals to make funny noises with their guitar? Look, I'm an early 30's computer guy...and even I know there are just places where technology should take a back seat.

    But, umm...to OP...yeah, I don't know about the future trib. I'm sure it's a solid guitar :)
     
  12. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    thembelly, sorry for hijacking a bit, sorry no info from me on that model you inquired about. Good luck with what you do get.
     
  13. nbeersiii

    nbeersiii Well-Known Member

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    When I asked that Gibson Rep about how the old robot guitars were not warrantied by gibson but by the makers of the tunning system and how that company went out of business so people had no choice but to convert to regular style tunners. Unless they found some used system. He said oh no there is a new company and all the bugs are worked out these are much better. I thought to myself, yeah right. Cut to a year or 2 after you buy one if even that long, it tears up and dont work right. I bet you have to use certain guage strings and what not or it wont function properly. Yeah Kevy what the heck is up with robot tunners on a 60s tribute that comes in a finish that you couldnt get on an SG until sometime in the 70s and no pickguard. Wich I think is the ugliest way to rock an SG. No offence to anybody with a naked SG. Just not my cup of tea for an SG. The pickguard on an SG gives it alot of its charm. Like a strat. A strat with no PG looks weird to me. I guess this is no worse than the unbeveled norlin era or the ones with the toggle switch way back in he wrong place. Gibson cant win for loosing with us luddites. LOL.
     
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  14. dbb

    dbb Well-Known Member

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    If you need robot tuners to tune up, then perhaps you shouldn't play guitar.
    Get a digital keyboard.
     
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  15. stdio

    stdio Member

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    I wish everyone got all worked up about wanting ABR-1 bridges again, I don't mind the Nashvilles but they still don't look right to my eye on certain models, and there are arguments about ABRs sounding better.

    I'm on the opposite side with neck profiles, I just wish everyone would let Gibson make highly playable necks for a few years. Then they can go back to the clunky necks that chord players love.

    I actually the admire the technical proficiency of the 80s shred guys (in the same way I admire jazz guys), but I never liked their tone. If there are young, technically proficient players out there, they'd sound better playing Gibsons.

    (Also, if my '86 Gibson SG-62 had taller frets, it could easily keep up with my ESP/LTD Viper 1000, which basically shreds itself. That's a different topic though :))
     
  16. thembelly

    thembelly New Member

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    Wow look what I started. I'm not get that guitar. It will probably be a stantard when I get the money. Or I will just get a strat because or the bolt on neck. Bull in china shop thought process. Knowing the sg is gone after one break. Thanks I will post when I get it
     
  17. JohnP

    JohnP Member

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    Unboxing FAQ

    Q: I’ve just unboxed my new guitar and there’s this foreign plastic element at the back of the headstock. I don’t think it’s supposed to be there, can somebody help me to remove it, please? /Bro

    [​IMG]
    Synthesizer Tribute

    A: Welcome to 2013 Bro! Don’t waste your time trying to tune this piece of wood. The guitar is an obsolete design from the 50’s that doesn’t really work. You know it’s got this truss rod thing in the neck (designed in 1920) and a lot of silly screws at the bridge. We got it all PLEK’d for ya. Just press the “Jingle bells” button. Happy camping.

    Q: I’ve just unboxed my new guitar and it’s out of tune! This piece of wood set me back thousands of dollars and it sounds awful (it’s out of tune and I don’t know how to play it). Something has obviously gone wrong at the quality department. /Dude

    A: Hi Dude, activate the plastic element at the back of your headstock on your Synthesizer Tribute. Plug in the USB-cable and press the “Jingle Bells” button. With seven CPU:s this guitar can play for hours!

    Q: What is this console made of? It doesn’t look like carbon fiber. Where do I turn it on? /Dick

    A: Hi Dick, The console is called a guitar. Some guitars are still made of wood, but we’re rapidly going into recycled paper and plastics that aren’t sensitive to changes in temperature and humidity and really stays in tune. The strings are making a lot of fret wear so we are thinking of getting rid of those too. At this time, we suggest that you plug in your Amplifier Tribute headphones and press the “Jingle Bells” button.

    [​IMG]
    Amplifier Tribute Headphones


    Sorry for ranting, I love Gibson. I try to keep an open mind at things, but I suddenly find myself being conservative and old fashioned. Maybe the “Guitar Hero” generation will never be prepared to put in the hours required to learn how to play. Reality is you just got to learn how to tune your guitar. Players that alternate between tunings, would typically change guitars, e.g for slide. (simple alternate tunings like Drop D you can manage in a second).

    When I started out playing in a band as a kid, the old man of one of the band mates said to us: “Kids, you got to be in tune – that’s the first thing you have to practice” We didn’t even have a tuning machine back then, but we managed just fine after some practicing.

    Am I being grumpy, hopelessly old fashioned, missing the point? I guess somebody have to talk me into this mini ETune device. (you don’t have to convince about the Marshall headphones though – must have:)
     
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  18. JohnP

    JohnP Member

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    The Violin can’t be reinvented, it was defined a long time ago and there’s no reason to change it. The same goes for the Electric Guitar (and most traditional instruments). Let’s face it; there has been no alteration to the original design from the 50’s that had any major impact neither on sound, nor on consumer preferences. Product development in this business is mostly about cosmetics, configuration of standard components, economy in manufacturing methods and resources.

    If an alteration is indeed an improvement, it still doesn’t matter; give us 14 degree peg head angle, we still want 17 for no obvious reason. Give us laminated necks and we still want single piece. Give us a Nashville bridge, we still want the old ABR-1, give us enhanced pickups, we still want the ’57 classics or even the old P-90! The design was written in stone more than 50 years ago.

    The Electric Guitar cannot be reinvented. Still, the manufacturers have to come up with news, to create interest and make us feel updated. True product development is when someone invents an instrument nobody have seen or heard before and this happens just a few times every century. The Hang (or Hang drum) developed in the year 2000 is the latest in the row, so we’ll have to wait for the next innovation to appear…

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQfET3Nr5xg]Hang Solo - Lady Gaga Paparazzi - YouTube[/ame]

    In the meantime, just press the jingle bells button:

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKcKQb_aywM]You Rock Guitar Review - Midi Guitar Review With Dan Mumm - YouTube[/ame]
     
  19. sgtbeefheart

    sgtbeefheart Well-Known Member

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    I think it's a bit of a stretch to call the Hang a new instrument.

    It comes from the West Indian Steelpans (The 55-gallon oil drum was used to make steelpans from around 1947.) via the thinner and more resonant Pang (2000) and
    became the Hang when it was made to be played with the hands.
     
  20. GTSG

    GTSG Active Member

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    I like that 24 in comparison to the other similar 24s I've seen. The tuners I'm not sold on, perhaps a pool in how long those will be around..lol.
     

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