How do I make my SG not sound so DARK???

Discussion in 'Tone Zone' started by livnat, Jan 24, 2005.

  1. livnat

    livnat New Member

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    Hi,
    I have a 2000 gibson SG Gothic. I replaced the original humbuckers with custom made P-90's. I had them made to sound more "fender-ish", and they indeed have more high-end and a nice ring. But the guitar still sound very very dark. It's not so much that it needs more high-end or treble- it has quite a nice amount of that- but that the bass and mids (and the overall sound) on this guitar sound extremely dark. While this is kinda cool, it also makes it limited to very certain uses.
    Any help?
    Is it the wood type? the potentiometers? the fact that it is an SG Gothic with thin satin finish? anything else?
    Thanks a lot!:)
    -Livnat
     
  2. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to ETSG livnat! Welcome aboard...... :D :D
     
  3. livnat

    livnat New Member

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    Thanks:)
     
  4. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    Just put a cap in series with the lead that goes to the output jack.

    Try about .1 at first and see if you need more or less.

    A smaller cap there will be less bass. A larger cap, more bass.

    And yes, you'll lose a bit power, but not much.

    OR

    Sell me your Goth.... and buy a Strat!~
     
  5. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    welcome livnat! what amp are you using? pups adjusted? new strings? mids scooped? are you using the blues90 pups?

    last but not least...ya got any pics??? :D
     
  6. maxguitar

    maxguitar Member

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    Try painting it a lighter color, like seafoam green or TV yellow.
     
  7. SG Lou

    SG Lou Moderator Staff Member

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    Mahogany tends to sound "darker". Believe it or not the wood has a lot to do with the sound. You can try what CB suggested. He wasn't kidding either about getting a Strat. Another thing you can do,if ya have the money and you'd like to retain the SG look is have one built out of Alder with a Maple neck. That will surely brighten up the sound !
     
  8. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    yea but BW...he says it's plenty brite.....sounds like a weak link to me... :?


    i have a similar thing with my set-up(only different)...i use a crate dx212 and it just doesn't sound right without using the peavey bass amp too.
     
  9. Sgmaniac

    Sgmaniac Guest

    Sounds like you need a new amp Skids. :lol: 8)
     
  10. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    yer right SGM! :cry:

    oh.....dx212...let me count the ways i hate thee....

    this amp would be great for someone playing metal or somethin, but i play mostly blues/class rock and it just ain't it!!
     
  11. Sgmaniac

    Sgmaniac Guest

  12. vic108

    vic108 Well-Known Member

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    Skids,

    Get a REAL amp Dude!
    You should be ass-shamed... :lol:
     
  13. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    that looks like a perfect amp for me from the reviews SGM....and the price is SO right too. lemme crawl my ass out of this slump and i'm on it! any of the guys from here played/own that one?

    i am ass-shamed vic......why do you think i was so happy to find an old toob PA amp at the dump? at least i might have hope of putting something together!
     
  14. vic108

    vic108 Well-Known Member

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  15. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    Its amazing what sounds can be coaxed with the right application of the wood.
     
  16. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    you get yer wood CURED yet CB? :shock: :p :lol: :lol:
     
  17. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    Listen.... let me revisit that cap trick.

    It does work, but the VALUE of the cap is very much an issue. Capacitors pass higher frequencies better than lower ones. So depending on the circuit... a capacitor in series will cut the lower frequencies a bit.

    Let me digress.

    At one time, I was trying to balance a 57 Classic HB with a 52RI Telecaster bridge pickup. By using the right capacitor, I could cut just the right amount of bottom out. Its gonna be a fairly large value like .1 or maybe .15... try a .1 first. What happens if too much bass end is cut out? Dont despair! Get a potentiometer, hopefully a smallish size like 100k, but 250k will do. Hook up one end and the middle around the capacitor like a bypass. Then dial in the tone you want. When its right, then take off the potentiometer and read it with an ohm meter (from the same two contact points). Whatever that value is, just solder a resistor of that same value (or real close) around the cap. Enterprising individuals will note that leaving the cap in place makes a sort of "bass" tone control.

    Another cure for too much treble (not your problem really, just noting it here), is to put a high value series resistance in place... try about 3megs to start. You'll not lose much volume, but will lose a lot of shrillness.
     
  18. livnat

    livnat New Member

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    Hey there,
    I didn't notice this thread was moved, that's why I didn't reply earlier... well, anyways...
    My amp is a peavey classic 50 4x10. It's a very middle-y amp, and it does have a tiney bit of darkness to it I guess- which is ok, I do like quite a BIT of darkness in my tone, just not that over the top!- but I love it and it works perfectly with my other guitars that I (at least currently) use more, so I'm definitely not gonna buy a new amp any time soon!
    BTW, I play alternative music, so no scooped mids:)
    For the people who suggested that I'd buy a strat instead- I hate strats, and I really don't see how this has anything to do with what I asked. I am not trying to make this guitar a strat, but the darkness of this guitar is just a bit too much for me:)
    The cap trick sounds good.
    Like I said, this guitar DOES have plenty of treble, but it has too much bass and lower mids, which sound very dark, while the treble and upper mids sound quite harsh on the other hand.
    Thanks for everyone who've answered.
    Any other thoughts?
    -Livnat
     
  19. ess

    ess Guest

    get an EQ? :?:
     
  20. GazzaBloom

    GazzaBloom Member

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    2nd that!

    A BOSS GE-7 is one the best "effects" a guitarist can have in his arsenal.

    A GE-7 can modify the tone of any amp significantly and with one of these I'm sure you'll add some brightness to a dark sound.

    Gazza
     

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