How do you practice?

Discussion in 'Lessons & Techniques' started by Madmatt, Oct 21, 2015.

  1. jtcnj

    jtcnj Well-Known Member

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    Kind of disorganized lately and not enough!
    But at least 1/2 hr to 45 min a day and sometimes a 1/2 hour or so before work and then upwards of 1-1/2 hours in the evening. Mostly unplugged though.

    Doo, you have a nice routine and time to do it.
     
  2. Kep

    Kep Well-Known Member

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    Great thread.

    I practice daily for 1-2 hours almost all on electric - weekends even more. For those of you starting out don't get discouraged as I have already set the bar for futility in terms of hours of practice vs. results.

    I start by running major scales then minor penatonic 10x to limber up. Then I play to recordings of our set list and work on new songs to bring to practice. This process is usually download tabs then an MP3 and working from both. If the lead is complicated I will go to UTube for help (man I wish they had that 30 years ago!) I'm not writing as much these days.

    I also have an hour lesson on Sundays focused on the Rockabilly sound - which is way out of my wheelhouse normally
     
  3. A_L

    A_L New Member

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    I usually run some scales, major, minor, mixolydian,... and try to improvise over whatever music I'm listenning to. I really need to be more constant. I'll try to practice in a way you recomand in this thread.
    I play about 1 hour per day during the week. I'm usually recording on saturday's afternoon with my composing band and I play with my cover band 3 hours on sunday.
     
  4. MarkGb

    MarkGb New Member

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    My answer to OP's original question is not enough.
     
  5. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    That !

    Hard to find mates that see jamming the same way I see it. Most will start on a known song and extend it forever. Let's say Spoonful by Cream. I find that so boring. Jamming for me is finding some riff and see where it leads. But to be able to do that, you have to be listening to others more than to yourself.
     
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  6. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    I gave up practicing some years ago and just play......6 to 8 hours/day when not stuck in hospital waiting rooms, as I have been the last few weeks.
     
  7. gball

    gball Well-Known Member

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    On "off" days (those when I am not playing with the band) I try to practice at least a half-hour each evening, more if time allows. I typically just noodle, trying to keep fluid and as improvisational as possible - sometimes I put on backing tracks or even whole albums to play with so that I can keep my chops up and push myself to "better" the recorded solos (wishful thinking). Many times I use a looper to just get a little groove going and start building layers on top if that - It allows me to cut loose a bit and be creative, and some of my best song ideas have come through this method of free-form experimentation.
     
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  8. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Confession time: I lapsed and didn't practice for about a week and a half.

    SWMBO's work schedule changed to where she'd be home asleep during my practice time. Throw in my picking up some extra hours and it wasn't the most productive time on the practice front. I broke out my axe today to get some Rocksmith time in and no surprise I sucked harder than usual.
    I know this just means I need to be more disciplined and focus now that things have returned to normal. For me to lose so much progress is frustrating.
     
  9. Heket

    Heket Well-Known Member

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    This is for bass, but I doubt it's much different for most non-classical musicians.

    I currently divide my practice into 6 smaller topics, aiming for 25mins+5mins break of each but I don't cry if I don't do it all (it's mainly only weekends that I do the full amount).

    1. A scale/arpeggio based exercise - currently doing arpeggios and scales, major, minor, dominant/myxolydian, ascending and descending in all keys following the circle of 5ths at a speed of 100bpm but aiming to get up to 180bpm (!). If I want a break from that I just pick a key and play along to a backing track using the scales and arpeggios.

    2. Working towards a big project to further my musicianship. For me at the moment that's learning theory, which I'm doing by going through a book specifically talking about practical music theory for bassists. Later it'll be reading score and I've also got a chords course lined up and a couple of other books to work through.

    3. Dedicated transcription/study pieces. Basically learning new stuff. OR creation and jamming. I can't do both of these in one session, my brain can't cope. This is the meat of my practice.

    4. "Just play". Do whatever you want! Also very important. If I'm short of time I'll choose transcription/jamming and just playing over anything else.

    5. Using video lessons, seminars, course work. This is where I practice things like technique, stylistic tweaks and bits and bobs. I say video lessons because that's how I do my stuff, but it could be working from a book, doing exercises you read on the internet, whatever.

    6. Listening. Because as a musician one of the single most important things you can do is actually listen to music. Really listen. Analyse songs too, chord progressions, rhythmic patterns, etc.
     
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  10. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    Nice videos for beginners.





     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2016
  11. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    Now for one of my favorites from one of my favorite albums. 2112

     
  12. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    AND FOR THE REAL THING!!!!

     
  13. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    Not the real thing,,,,,,,,,,,,, But one of my favorite Rush songs.

    Lessons!!!!

     
  14. jtcnj

    jtcnj Well-Known Member

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    That was the first concept album I heard and really got into.
    Very cool. Very relevant in todays times too.
    Awesome, now I'm thinking back about it.
    I think I do have that on CD.
    I'm going to find out at about 4:00PM today.

    "we have assumed control. we have assumed control"
     
  15. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    And the real thing. Sic Sic Sic,,,,,,,,, listen to the dynamics,,,,,,,,,,,, the Almost groove like Neil Peart, plus the deep then dancing basslines Geddy puts forth. Alex's gentle strumming, justaposed to his searing leads. Pure genius!!! I wore this song out in my teens. HAHA

     
  16. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    I still have it on Vinyl,,,,,,,,,,, JTC
     
  17. smitty_p

    smitty_p Well-Known Member

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    This isn't really a practice technique, as much as it is an approach.

    Don't Practice your mistakes. If you find yourself making mistakes...STOP! Get up. Walk around. Get the blood flowing and come back in a few minutes and resume with a clearer head. Go slower, or adjust your posture, or whatever you need until you get it right and practice what is right.

    Give your brain time to process the info. Everyone is different, but when learning something new, I will practice only for short stints of very focused attention...maybe 15 or 20 minutes. Then I'll get up, walk around, get a cup of water or something, and then resume.

    Get sleep. This feeds into the idea above. Your brain processes info as you sleep. Give your brain time to do its work.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2016
    Madmatt, ivan H, RVA and 1 other person like this.
  18. jtcnj

    jtcnj Well-Known Member

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    @smitty_p
    Thanks for turning me on to Steve Stine.
    Much is a review of things I started to learn earlier but now understand better.
     

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