How much did higher education cost you?

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by Layne Matz, Aug 6, 2019.

  1. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    I agree with a lot of that and you sure suprised me *however i think the point stands that what you are saying is empircally true however there are still a very large portion of higher wage jobs that today in America you CANNOT be hired for without certain educational credentials.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
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  2. DaveInSoCal

    DaveInSoCal Active Member

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    I agree! I also was an avionics guy in the military, I did not go to college but I currently work in the IT field which in my opinion doesn't require a degree. Experience and certifications are what employers are looking for. The thing about IT, what you learned in college is basically obsolete within 5 years

    I guess it depends on the career path, and just because one has a degree doesn't mean they're smart. I have met plenty of folks with degrees that are fairly incompetent in their field.

    But back to the OP's topic, if you have plenty of time to research you will find a path for your kids to go to college.
     
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  3. Voxman

    Voxman Moderator Staff Member

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    I only owed 10K for 2 years and then I hit the road playing all over in a show band for years and years. If you got sick or needed time off a day or two you immediately got replaced.
     
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  4. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    When I took my degree and subsequent PhD, I got a full grant to cover the tuition fees and materials. All I had to meet was living expenses, which I would have faced anyway. So I'm going to say my entire education was paid for by other people through taxes. I hope I have more than repaid that cost during my working life (which is still carrying on at age 69).
     
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  5. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    My experience is that a degree will get you your first job. After that it is your track record that matters.
     
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  6. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Active Member

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    The value of an education goes beyond jobs, however. Frankly, my Bachelor's didn't contribute much to my career. I was hired away from a Master's program that probably did. However, my Liberal Arts Bachelor's contributed more to me personally than my Master's work in music composition, electronic music, and recording studio techniques.

    My Bachelor's study of philosophy, logic, history, didn't make me smarter because smartness is more of a capacity than a destination. Instead my studies developed my analytical capabilities, how I approach information and consider it. It made me more circumspect, more critical, and slower to jump to conclusions. It provided a lot of history of humanity, our history of thought processes, and the mistakes that have been made in the past. Of course, that provided an opportunity to avoid those mistakes. It also developed my proclivity as an autodidact, so perhaps it contributed to my career as a recording engineer, after all.

    So, it was a developmental thing.

    Bob
     
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  7. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    My analytical skills education began in my very first secondary school lesson at age eleven. The teacher used the Socratic method, and we went through all the major debating tricks and failings, beginning by learning the logical absolutes, on which all of reason stands. This lesson was unusual in that the text book was a gift, not a one year loan, and I still have it.
    I understand that this doesn't still happen, and that saddens me.
     
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  8. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Learning is a lifelong process whether one goes to college or not.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  9. fos1

    fos1 Active Member

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    I graduated from Univ. of North Florida in 1975. Back then, a degree from a small state university didn't cost a lot. I always had some kind of part time job, as did my wife. There was no government money back then. I took out small loans from the university from time to time. They had to be paid back by the end of the semester. I was a science major so many times the books cost more than the tuition.

    Grad school, later in life, was a different story. I went to Texas Tech. Each course cost several thousand dollars. I am still working off the loans. :( The later degrees did help me work into a different place.
     
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  10. PAFHumbucker

    PAFHumbucker Well-Known Member

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    I went to a state college from 95-99. Tuition was just over 3000 a year at the time and I had a scholarship that covered 1500 a year. I commuted to school and didn't live on campus.

    I was a mass comm major and I actually worked in radio for 13 years until I switched careers.
     
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  11. sazista

    sazista Active Member

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    BA; $16,000,
    MA; $13,000.
    I appreciate that in many countries University is paid for by the State; Germany, Argentina, etc. I think it should be that way. School for profit is a backwards, lame, regressive idea.
     
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  12. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    British universities charge currently £9000 ($11,000) per year. A Bachelor's degree course is three years, a Masters two more on top of that and a PhD - who knows? Mine lasted three. I would be bankrupt had I not done them when this was all paid for by grants. That was possible back then because only about 2% of the population went to university.
     
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  13. sazista

    sazista Active Member

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    I agree and don't. At the root of ALL of our musical discussion is an issue of 'class', 'access', 'privilege', etc. Some are musicians because of this distinction , and vice-versa. Education can offer one things that others may not have, eventually aiming you in a different direction, musically too. But anyhow, Gasket, just let it go, or ignore it; there's no reason to get sour. I appreciate your input on many posting here. If there is somthing that just doesn't work for me, for example, sports, I look for a thread that does. Happy Thursday from Chile!
     
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  14. Gahr

    Gahr Well-Known Member

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    Here in Norway education is basically free. No state owned schools, polytechnics or universities have tuition fees. You get in based on your grades/qualifications. ("Free" obviously means paid for by the taxpayers.) I finished high school in 1991, and went to a local polytechnic in my hometown in the fall of '91 while still living at home. In 1992 I served my compulsory year in the army, and after that I spent half a year doing different courses again at the same poly. In the fall of 1993 I moved to Bergen to attend university. I spent a total of seven years at the university, finishing my Master's in the spring of 1999 and doing a year of pedagogics after that.

    During this time I didn't pay anything for tuition/courses, but I had too buy all the relevant literature, except for in a few cases where we could rent certain books cheaply at the uni. Depending on what courses I took, the cost of books varied from around $250 to $600 (today's exchange rate).

    The state provides loans for students to cover living expenses while studying. The loans are interest free until you finish your studies (there is a limit to how much they will give you, though). A portion of the debt (about one year's worth) was erased after I finished my master's. I don't know if it still works that way, though. For the first three years I was able to scrape by without working on the side, but after a while the yearly loans were not enough (they didn't really increase much during my time as a student), and I had to get a job at weekends. I worked during the summers all the time, though. My total student's debt was a little over $30.000 at today's exchange rate. I finished paying it off last summer. The debt is personal, meaning nobody inherits it if you die. You pay it off in monthly instalments, but you are not required to start paying until you get a job earning a certain sum every month. You are not accumulating any interest as long as you are a student either.

    Without my education I would not have got a job as a teacher. I studied English and history, which means I'm qualified for teaching those subjects (along with a couple of others). Pedagogics is also a required subject if you want to get a permanent teaching position. I worked as a teacher for about 12 years before I became a brewer. I had no formal qualifications as a brewer when I started back in 2013. I have since completed a two-week Diploma Craft Brewer course at the Scandinavian School of Brewing, but I'm basically self taught, having read tons of books on the subject and having brewed at home and now professionally for a total of 28 years.

    Would I do things differently if I were to become 20 years old again? Possibly, but I don't regret anything. The only thing I would have started doing earlier is to save money in an index fund...:D
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2019
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  15. [RGMW]largie

    [RGMW]largie New Member

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    I'm in the UK and was lucky enough to graduate with a BSc in 1986.At the time a comparatively small number of students went on to university and those that did were given a means tested Grant towards living costs while all course fees were paid by the local authority. As a result I graduated owing nothing :-)
    Subsequently government noted that people with degrees earned more than those without so decided to greatly increase the number of people going to university to the point the grant system could not cope any longer so it has been replaced with the student loan system.
    Dave
    [Rgmw]largie
     
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  16. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    On the plus side, you can be sure that you will be asked if you want fries with that in perfect grammar.
     
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  17. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Fish n Chips
     
  18. Chuteboxehero

    Chuteboxehero Active Member

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    About 16k all in to learn a trade. 15 years later and my friends that teach make less than I do to fix the buses the kids ride to school. Seems unfair although they do get a nice vacation every summer. Plus they are technically smarter then me. And they have a pension....
    At some point I think there's a trade off where you love what you do and possibly make less money doing it or you do something you may not even like, let alone love doing because it provides you with the means to do the things you like to do when you're not at work. I'm in the 2nd group.
     
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