Modding my Epi SG

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Layne Matz, Apr 27, 2018.

  1. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    I just put D ring hooks on as locking straps...

    Earlier this week I glued the crack in the neck with liquid nails. Its very relieving.

    I want to put a Vibrola on this thing but I can't afford it. I can't even afford my phone bill. I'm sitting outaide mcdonalds using Wi-Fi. I'm a vegetarian and I would never eat here. Being poor doesn't stop me from playing though!

    I'm willing to bite the bullet and use a Bigsby.

    Would someone be willing to donate a Bigsby to my SG? I can't afford to pay anyone. I'm getting work soon. I'm lucky to have electricity and food honsetly.

    I'm not trying to violate any rules or steal from people. I just have some things I want to change for music's sake.

    Oh, another question. I'm thinking of putting this neck plate from my Epi SG bass(I replaced the bass one with a spare) on my SG six string.

    My question is, would it help the neck stability?

    Also, is liquid nails strong enough for guitar body building???

    20180427_193739-1.jpg
     
  2. JazzyJeff

    JazzyJeff Member

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    :(
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
  3. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Well-Known Member

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    oh no no no no no no no.........

    Liquid nails isn't going to hold the tension for long. Should have used "Tight Bond". Right now the neck is probably being held together by that strap screw. And.... your action has GOT to suck. The neck plate won't do a damn thing, since the holes won't hit the neck properly.

    Serious time now. The proper fix, would have been to completely open up that break, drilling holes to stop the crack from spreading, injecting glue PROPERLY, then clamp. If that came to my shop, I would have to break it apart, and glue/clamp, after removing as much as the liquid nail stuff as possible.
    To keep it stable, you may have to countersink 2 wood screws into the body and into the neck. May not be pretty, but will be better at holding it, then the "nail" crap.

    As for a Bigsby, oh F*CK no! Especially with a bad repair like that. A little trem, then releasing the arm will suddenly put around 110 lbs of tension (Using 10-46 strings.) on a damaged joint. BAD idea. The term "kindling" comes to mind.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
    Layne Matz likes this.
  4. Paully

    Paully Active Member

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    Liquid Nails No Bueno
     
  5. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    Okay, so I'll start by stating that the neck isnt any less stable than a Gibson SG I played recently. I thought it was at one point.

    I took the strap button out, tuned to Open A, and pulled damn hard and i couldnt get that F ing crack to spread any further. I used a hypodermic needle to inject the glue, but while poking around I discovered that this crack is not very deep. I had the guitar inspected at the guitar center in Nashville and the guy told me it was a lacquer crack that wouldnt be a probpem unless I dropped it.

    Ive been using the liquid nails for miscellaneous things lately and it seems to work alright, however will not bond with metal well at all.

    This SG is incomplete without some form of vibrato tremelo system. I am not worried at all about the neck comimg off or the crack growing... I used to be. Not so much anymore. This crack SURE AS HELL isnt as bad as I once thought it was. Its purely aesthetic, i thought the tuning was a little wobbly but that was a result of me doing 2 things... 1. Playing sitting down with the strigms nearly facing the ceiling and 2. Heavy handed playing, I dont ever need to be aggressive with .10-.49 strings- for years I was playing 100% on an acoustic with .13-56. Back then i hadmt heard of E flat tuning or I sure as hell would have used it. I had only used .9s once back then and I hated them and other light strings with a burning rage.

    Anywho, when i got my SG (my first full size electric) i tried 11s and they were alright but I started to develop a different way of playing- a more delicatr and articulate way. I decided i wanted .10s for the ease. A lot of things are VERY HARD to play with .13s in standard or higher. You need iron hands for that.

    Now I use .12-54 on my strat in standard and other tunings- no problem at all. My SG requires more of a delicate touch but muscle memory is finally accepting the minor changes between my different guitars and the varying tunings and tensions.

    -side question: why do we call it a tremelo bar? Isnt it more accurately a vibrato bar?

    When i got this SG I decided I would probably get another one later on. I ALMOST bought a white partcaster SG with a bigsby and P90s for $100 bucks but i didnt at the time and i saved my cash. A week later I bought me strat for $40 at a pawn shop. This SG is sentimental because my Mom bought it for me, for my 18th birthday.

    Note: I will put a bigsby on it sooner or later, and I like the white where the crack is.

    Im not disregardimg your advice at all, just applying it to what I know to be true about this instrument.
     
  6. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    Oh, and the strap button IS NOT holding the neck on. I took it out and played that way for a couple hours before I put it back on with the D rings. Sorry, but this SG is ALIVE AND WELL.
     

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