Need Some Information as I am New in Playing Guitar

Discussion in 'Other Guitars' started by HelenBooker, Nov 16, 2014.

  1. HelenBooker

    HelenBooker New Member

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    My teenage cousin is planning to learn guitar, and I am still thinking to buy her a Fretlight guitar (http://tinyurl.com/o5lfhcs) but I've heard that Rocksmith method (http://tinyurl.com/ntbln4b) is better than the former. Has anybody some experiences with any of them?
     
  2. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Never tried it, but it may be OK. The thing is that people seem to pick up the guitar pretty quickly without these aids, and after a few weeks they will be unnecessary and probably unused.

    You can get a seriously nice normal guitar for $399 - I think I would be spending those dollars on intrinsic quality rather than some technology that will have limited use.
     
    flyswatter, eS.G., SG John and 3 others like this.
  3. Alex_SG

    Alex_SG Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely agree with Don. Also, lessons from a reputable teacher would be money well spent .
    After a few lessons, she should have a good basic grounding that she can build on by experimentation...
    Good luck!
     
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  4. dampsneaker

    dampsneaker Well-Known Member

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    Another in total agreement with Don. Check the real guitars on this page for $399 (or less), especially the Epiphone and Fender Squier lines. Those are actually good quality instruments that will be hard to resist playing and keep her happy for years after the initial learning curve is past. Nothing like an instrument that says "pick me up and play me". You can check back in here for opinions on specific models. Oh, and you are one terrific older cousin too. :thumb:
     
    eS.G. likes this.
  5. eS.G.

    eS.G. Well-Known Member

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    I can ad no more, all good advice above. LEt us know what you decide!
    Hopefully an SG maybe in your nieces future????
    And WELCOME to another Buckeye! :)
     
  6. flyswatter

    flyswatter Member

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    An Epiphone G400 (SG model) or a used Squier Classic Vibe Stratocaster or Fender Mexican Standard Strat can all be had for around $300 or less. I agree with everyone else that a quality guitar is the best possible gift you can give a learner.

    The days are gone when beginners had to learn on crappy, hard to play import models that barely stayed in tune (like I did decades ago).
     
    shreddy bender likes this.
  7. LeadFinger

    LeadFinger Well-Known Member

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    I think the best advice given here is to invest in a good instructor. That human interaction really makes a difference when you're fumbling around in the very beginning. As for the guitar, I'd recommend one of the very decent under $300 acoustics now available. Learning on an acoustic gets you playing songs quickly, in a way that connects you to the music directly, organically. She should put her hands on a bunch of guitars and let one pick her.
     
  8. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    .... it's very discouraging to buy a sub-standard instrument to try and learn on it. You don't need to spend a fortune on one, but you need to make sure it's worthy of the learning. I always suggest taking someone that knows at least a little about good guitars along when looking. :)
     
  9. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    that's a really good idea... thanks Six String for posting it.

    I also recommend that you buy the new player a decent acoustic first, from a guitar
    store that can set it up for her so that it's not discouraging to play.

    The idea of taking a knowledgable player along to give advice is actually priceless.
    And I recommend bringing the girl along too, so that she can pick out several that
    appeal to her, and then listen to the experienced player for advice on which is the
    best inside the budget. Some people think it's more important that it be a surprise.
    I DO NOT. I think it's more important that the recipient gets to choose her guitar, she's much more likely to bond with it and keep playing.

    And lessons from a cool teacher are also priceless... and money well spent. A good instructor will get the girl started right, and that will make it much easier for her to stay interested and develop her music.

    Many of us learned to play on a POS guitar... we would not wish that on anyone. Many of us learned by teaching ourselves... and had to struggle for years to overcome bad habits that we would not have developed with proper instruction.

    To answer your original question: I don't think anyone here has replied favorably to your idea about the fretlight. The consensus here seems to be: buy her as good a used guitar as you can afford, and reserve some of your money for lessons and getting the guitar set up. She could start with an acoustic or an electric... let her decide. The acoustic doesn't need an amp. the electric does, and that will have to be included in the budget.

    Good luck with this. Thanks for turning to us for advice. Feel free to ask further questions if you need to. Or let her ask them. I believe she should be fully involved in
    the process. It's her music.
     
  10. randy haley

    randy haley New Member

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    when i got my son his first guitar he loved it ,,,then i got him the rocksmith & he used it learned pretty much on it ,but it was like playing a video game after awhile ,,he wasnt learning what he was doing ,,i had taught him chords & different things & he was progressing nicely ,,,his mother decided to get him guitar lesson from a reputable instructor near there home ,,he started learning what it was he was doing even more ,,,he's beeen playing 2 yrs now ,,& has really learned a whole lot ,,,i say anything that keeps there intrest is good ,,,but i say a teacher is the best way to go ,,he plays all kinds of stuff now ,,,uses youtube & all kinds of ways to learn songs since he pretty well has the basics down now
     
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  11. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    I never had a teacher and suggest you seriously consider it. It saves time in the long run. I started playing when I was 8 and was 15-16 before I felt I could play in a band... not that that has to be a goal. What motivated me to want to play for ppl was the enjoyment I got from playing. I wanted other people to enjoy the music too. I still feel that today.

    And for the teacher... you will find there are many styles and types out there. Don't be afraid to question them before committing. Guitar teachers are not Gods... they happen to have knowledge that depending on their style can be very rewarding. :)
     
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  12. Alex_SG

    Alex_SG Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the above. The only teacher I had just wanted to criticise the way I held the neck of the guitar. (thumb over the top of the neck).
    I actually have a slight physical impairment of my left hand (carpal tunnel syndrome) which causes my thumb to lock up when holding my guitar neck in the "classical" thumb behind neck way, and this actually causes me physical pain.
    He was more interested in that than actually teaching me anything useful.
    That left a sour taste in my mouth, so I decided to go it alone and teach myself.
    I'm not a brilliant player by a long shot, but I only play for myself anyway.
    I believe that regardless of your skill level, if you enjoy what you do, you've succeeded!
     

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