Not too impressed with faded sg special....

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by RollnROCK89, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. RollnROCK89

    RollnROCK89 New Member

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    Hey, yesterday I went to my local music store to try out a gibson faded sg special in worn cherry. I must say I was rather dissapointed. This thing could not stay in tune at all. Even had one of the store guys tune it, as soon as he gave it back to me, the highest strings were out. The frets were also very grimey, and the action was too high, but those can be fixed with a good setup. Does anyone elses fadeds have major tuning problems? They didn't have any standards, but im begining to think it might be worth saving up for one. Thanks.
     
  2. SG Lou

    SG Lou Moderator Staff Member

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    If it is a display piece you can bet it's been man handled. Nothing a good set up can't fix ! :wink:
     
  3. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    STRETCH those strings in.

    Could be it was restrung and never stretched in well. OR, maybe factory strings still.

    Grimey.. get a rag, and rub down the neck!

    As for tuning, I've got two of em... two fadeds, and both hold their tune 100 percent for weeks at a time.

    On an aside - people blame the guitar for not holding tune, where really... its seldom the guitars "fault", always improper stringing, or improper prep of the strings after stringing (ie, stretching). SOMETIMES, it can be the nut... or even the tail, but usually you'll hear a "creak" when tuning if it is.

    They hold tune. There's nothing dismal about the fadeds, except the finish.

    Look at this thread:

    http://everythingsg.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1528

    [​IMG]
     
  4. TNT

    TNT Active Member

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    I think that what you experienced should reflect more on the dealer :( than the guitar RollinRock89. My guess is that you were at a GC or some large store. Most small stores have more time to keep their guits shiny.Strings might still be new and the neck might not have settled down yet. If you want a Standard that's fine but don't dismiss the Special because of a bad setup :!:
     
  5. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    Most.... (not all)..... dealers are more into the sales and $$$ end of the guitar, so if if isn't set up......... it doesn't necessarily mean it's a "bad guitar". :) :) :)
     
  6. omni

    omni New Member

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    Gibson also have a reputation of not setting up the guitar properly before being shipped. Of course you can also argue that the setup of a guitar is a rather personal affair. But most of the time this is a good reason to buy your guitar at a smaller shop who will do this for you.

    My impression of the faded SG was very good. It felt like a solid, well built workhorse guitar. I loved the finish, which I heard is rather prone to dents but who cares. I think it will age beautifully and the neck will only get beter with use. Also the faded finish works very well with the design of the SG much beter than with the LP for instance.

    For that money it's the best Gibson you can buy! Also the only one.
    :D But that's just over here in the EU I think.
     
  7. Voxman

    Voxman Moderator Staff Member

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    Gibson doesn't adjust these things well at all......I would get a fret dress and complete setup on any new guitar I bought! They are a big corporation and don't have much respect for our hard earned $ unless we spend 5K or more.........
     
  8. particle

    particle New Member

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    I got a faded sg special and I thought it had severe tuning issues as well. It simply needed about a month or two to break in, and now the sucker stays in tune for days at a time.

    Do the unwound strings "chirp" as you tune them? It's kinda like a metallic ping type of sound... One thing that really helped was when I sharpened a #2 pencil, pulled each string out of its slot in the nut, and rubbing some graphite from the pencil into each notch before replacing the string. That helped a lot, but what helped more than anything else was a bit of time. I was about to order some grover tuners for the thing, but now I'm really glad I didn't... Absolutely no need.
     
  9. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    That chirp is a nut slot that is too tight - its binding.

    Let me add something about the setups of the two guitars I got.

    The intonation was dead on perfect on both. I was amazed. Both were set with a little bit too much relief, and the strings sort of high. Both nuts were fit pretty well, the brown one especially well. The red one has the G slot just a tad too low, but it doesn't buzz, and its livable.

    Ok... let me tell you why Gibson, Fender, all the rest set the guitars up that way.... yes folks ITS ON PURPOSE!

    As the humidity level varies from the factory, to shipping, to warehousing, to distribution, to the dealers back room, to the showroom... it is quite likely that the instrument* is going to change its setup. Its just gonna happen. So the factory has two options: A) Set it up really well and risk it being non playable due to buzzing, etc, at the dealers, or B) Set it up a bit high and at least have it be playable, even if it then needs a setup.

    As a lot, we guitar players tend to favor guitars in the B group. You go to a store, and play two axes. One buzzes bad, the other has high action. You buy the one with high action.... knowing it can be lowered. Its musicians nature I guess. The dread of the manufacturers is to have the thing buzz right out of the box.... hence, they intentionally set them up sort of high and with a bunch of relief. It also saves the dealer of HAVING to set up each instrument. The dealer would have to if they all buzzed. If they're a bit high... they can SELL a setup to the buyer. Its just the way it is.
     
  10. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    makes alot of sense CB..... :wink:
     
  11. Voxman

    Voxman Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't forget that the woods still green..................
     
  12. Sgmaniac

    Sgmaniac Guest

  13. TNT

    TNT Active Member

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    That's just too funny! :lol:
     
  14. musicalhair

    musicalhair New Member

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    I've not had any tuning problems with my Cherry Faded SG. I think it is a pretty nice guitar. It is the only SG I own and besides an acoustic the only Gibson.

    The only thing is I'm thinking about switching out the stock humbucker for Duncan Phat Cats or the Bill Lawrence humbucker sized P-90 wannabes.
     
  15. balboa

    balboa Member

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    i had a faded special for a short while but i traded it in for a standard, im kinda pissed now, i loved that guitar
     
  16. Lumbergh

    Lumbergh Member

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    i <3 my faded sg special. mine never goes out of tune.

    charlieb, did u install those pup covers? which ones did u buy, and could u tell me how to install them? i dont wanna screw up, if u know what i mean. :wink:
     
  17. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    Gibson makes two sizes of pickups. Neck and Bridge, call them rhythm and treble too.

    They make covers, in chrome, nickle and gold for both sizes.

    You'll want the chrome ones, one of each size - use the link on the webpage here (see the bottom of the main BBS page to get to the website), and there is a place there where you can click thru to the Musicians Friend website, and order each one.

    Installing them is pretty easy. Its best to take the strings off, and take off the pickguard. You'll have to take the bridge off (it lifts off) and take out the studs too. Undo the pickups, and you'll have enuough wire to move them free of the body to solder them. DO NOT try to solder them when they're attached to the pickguard. Before you mount the covers, you'll need to trim the excess tape from the pickups using your fingernail or ice cream stick or something that wont slip and cut the windings. You only remove it from the pickup frame, its not big deal really... Then sand the inside area of the cover where you want to solder it, since solder wont stick to chrome. Use 220 paper to get thru the chrome to clean metal. Put the cover on, make sure its in the right position. Raise the poles a bit to make sure they enter the holes ok. Then solder it with like... a 40watt iron. DO NOT use a soldering gun. It can degauss the magnets a little. Even the iron can, but you'll not be THAT close to the magnets. It only takes about 1/4 inch bead of solder flow to attach the cover (look at a picture of a factory cover solder joint). Thats it, let it cool, stick it back together.

    HINT: Put a dab of magic marker on the stud wheel facing toward the neck of the guitar. Then after you take off the bridge LOWER the studs till they bottom out, COUNTING how many turns it is (watch the mark). Keep each stud marked seperately, ie one dot on one, two dots on the other... Now write down what you got as far as turns go... and unscrew the studs. When you reinstall the studs, just bottom them out, then screw them upward the correct number of turns and align the dots toward the bridge, and they're right were they were!
     
  18. backup and lead

    backup and lead New Member

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    maybe the strings were brand new
     
  19. hambucker

    hambucker Member

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    No need to wax pot them?
     
  20. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    The pickups are already wax potted - the windings is really the part that needs it. However, to prevent the cover from causing squealing problems its a good idea to pot that too. Fortunately, on a new pickup, there's enuf wax there to effectively drips between the top of the pickup and the inside of the cover when you heat it up from soldering.

    Covered pickups are not "filled with wax". They drain 'em pretty well at the factory.
     

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