On this day in history

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by Tobacco Worm, Dec 29, 2014.

  1. Tobacco Worm

    Tobacco Worm Well-Known Member

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    Today, Dec 29th, has dual meaning for me. On the one hand it was my mother's birthday. She has been gone since 1984. On the other it was a tragic day for the Lakota Nation. Both occasions have meaning to me.

    In 1890, at Wounded Knee Creek, there was a loosely banded together group of half starved and near frozen Lakota lead by an old man named Big Foot. Some 350 men, women, and children were huddled together in the snow as 500 heavily armed troopers of the 7th Cavalry searched the camp while under the cover of artillery upon a ridge above. This band of Lakota were trying to reach the Pine Ridge Reservation to meet up with Red Cloud and his people there for protection and food.

    While searching the camp and disarming the few that had any weapons, one Lakota, Black Coyote, refused to comply with the confiscation of his weapon. Being deaf, he did not understand what was being said and in the confusion of this a shot rang out. The soldiers immediately began firing into the unarmed crowd of Lakota people in the camp. Soon the artillery from the ridge above thundered it's explosive rounds down upon the encampment adding further still to the dead and dying below. Those that were not killed by the cannon fire were tracked down and shot to death where they stood or lay in the snow. After an hour had passed the soldiers had managed to kill all 350 unarmed Lakota comprised mostly of women and children with some men in their later years as well. Their frozen bodies remained in the snow for several days until being buried in a mass grave sometime later.

    Congress awarded 20 Medals of Honor to troopers of the 7th Cavalry for their "heroics" at the slaughter of 350 unarmed people. The members of the 7th Cav proudly declared that they avenged Col. G.A. Custer, only they forgot to admit that Custer and the 7th were an invading army attacking the homes of people on their own land in June of 1876. They always forget that part where the army was attacking a camp of women and children until the men there came out to fight. Only this time, in 1890, they were still attacking a camp but had already disarmed any there that could put up a fight. So it was a lot easier to "earn" all those medals.

    On the site where the many are buried there is a small pillar-like monument that lists many of the names of those buried in that mass grave. Among the names on the monument one can see the name Ghost Horse displayed there with the others who died that day. Those that know me can see. They can feel my connection. I am of the Ghost Horse family. When I am dead I will be made into ash and taken there to join those that went before me.
    Lakota ho Hoka Hey! Heyseechu'a Wilo
     
  2. JohnnyGoo

    JohnnyGoo Well-Known Member

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    I do alot of reading on this type of thing Tobacco Worm.Fetterman,Custer,ect.Black Kettle,Crazy Horse.although not Lakota,im 1/8th Cherokee decended from the White River bunch of Missouri.my Grandmother was Cherokee and Chocta mix.from the things i read im surprized the Redman isnt still takin scalps. Alot of things that were done to the Indians was just wrong. Who could be proud of a Medal of Honor earned like that killing unarmed women and children and the elderly.
     
  3. dbb

    dbb Well-Known Member

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    I think now they take the scalps in the form of casino dollars, "scalping" the gamblers! and more power to the Tribes.
     
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  4. Tobacco Worm

    Tobacco Worm Well-Known Member

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    The Cherokee have much to be proud of. It was the the Six Nations form of government that the newly formed United States took as the basis of government for their new nation. The founding fathers of the U.S. had many members of the tribes present as advisers long ago when drafting this new nations methods of government. The U.S. was glad to have them there then to help guide them. Then later, they drove the Cherokee off their land and forced them onto a reservation in a place that no one else wanted killing hundreds along the way on the Trail of Tears. They only wanted the land back when oil was found and didn't want any indians getting any money out of it. Florida was thought to be no good swamp land and was used for prison locations for captured or surrendered indians even as late as the 1880's. Then when there was a profit to be made there even the prisoners got kicked out! Typical.:squint:
     
  5. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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  6. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    Pine Ridge reservation after massacre c.1891
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    Plenty Horse
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    Rosebud and Sioux Indian, War Dance at Pine Ridge 1890 ​
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