Ouch !

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by DrBGood, Apr 2, 2019.

  1. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    In a local ad ...
    1963 Les Paul Junior. Neck re-inforced with screws. 100% solid and original. 3200$

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  2. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Well-Known Member

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    Someone needs to go full rage-panda on that dolt.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2019
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  3. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    Tabarnak!
     
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  4. pancake81

    pancake81 Well-Known Member

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    “All Orginal”....?

    Those neck screws have an aftermarket look about them.

    Jesus Christ. That’s terrible
     
  5. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    They cold have used Robertson screws at least! -Robertson... the superior screw!
     
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  6. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    :rofl: RIGHT !
     
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  7. brazilnut

    brazilnut Well-Known Member

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    Dolt doesn't BEGIN to describe this cretin. What an assh^le.
     
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  8. brazilnut

    brazilnut Well-Known Member

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    A good repairman could fix it, mostly. Maybe. What a Sh^t hook!
     
  9. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps they had a few screws lodged between their medulla and oblongata?
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2019
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  10. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    Well if someone wants to buy it for me Id be thrilled to restore her to immaculate condition... Thats an attrocity. A 63 of all things!
     
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  11. Didds

    Didds Well-Known Member

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    Someone needs to give the same treatment to whoever did this
     
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  12. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, six screws through their own neck would be fitting.
     
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  13. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Yikes. There’s a guy on eBay right now selling an original 62 SG special for $800 opening bid (no bids made, almost over) that has the neck nailed back onto it. I made him an offer of $650 which I still thought was a lot because the only original parts left in it are the pots, the pick guard, and the knobs and it needs a ton of $$ luthier work. I just thought there’s no way I’ll get a vintage one in that price range again so worth a shot to take a bit of a leap and he counteroffered. So he’s ready to negotiate but I declined. If you want your own improvised “reinforcements neck” vintage SG, it’s out there still!
     
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  14. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    I very well might buy one someday... Thats a huge knockoff the price and it wont be very difficult to repair- within reason.
     
  15. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    DUPLICATE POST DELETED
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
  16. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    This one had a crack in the heel and the neck was reset (but not angled properly) and then secured with a nail on each side. The guy said "high action, could be great for slide guitar" or something to that effect so I'm thinking "unplayable as is". And there was a crack in the body right at the bottom of one of the horns, near the neck heel. And not original finish but not bad looking. A project for sure.

    For $800 you got original pots, original pickguard, original knobs, and the wood that was mostly refinished and had dowels plugging where the old bigsby trem or maestro had been (so discolored dots on the face of the guitar). I figured "you can sell the knobs for $120 or so, the pots maybe $100, the pickups were modern name brand P90s so maybe $100 for the pair, maybe $100 for the pickguard. So if it's just irreperable than there's $320 or so right there. How much risk are you willing to take?" I made my offier, he countered so I could have gotten it at a little under $800.

    An original 1962, in kind of poor condition but still, it exists. I wanted to push that button but I just couldn't imagine trying to convince my wife that I bought a broken guitar that MIGHT be fixable and if not I'd only be losing a few hundred bucks (realistically I think getting the money back from it would be doable if you pieced out the parts and then sold the husk for a couple hundred, shame as that sounds). Still, she doesn't "get" it. Too much of a project to justify the fight.

    If you want to take a chance on it, it can be had here: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-1962-Gibson-Sg-Special-good-condition/163622961639?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2055359.m2763.l2649
     
  17. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately I live dollar to dollar most of the time and thatd out of the question at the moment. I bought my Epi SG damaged for 150USD + a peavey amp, strings and a glass slide. After much use and nearly a dozen gigs the neck came off after going over some traintracks too fast. I've just recently repaired and refinished it and its better than when I got it. Someday i might have money but with my luck sooner or later a broken one will come my way dirt cheap or free. Im confident that I could adequately repair just about any kind of damage done to a guitar, within reason. Sometimes you encounter people with the most remarkable generosity. Im grateful to have encountered so many good people in my life.

    EDIT: Lets be clear, the only thing truely irrepairable that I can think of is a completely burnt guitar- one thats completely ashes. Even burnt peices could be reconstructed ome way or another. There are a lot of creative tinkerers out there. These SGs ARE PERFECTLY REPAIRABLE!
     
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  18. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you are right. There is nothing that is irreperable. Send it to the smithsonian and a crack team will make it look like it just rolled off the factory floor. But that costs $$$ unless you have the tools, materials, and skills to do it yourself (which it sounds like you do from your story). I don't so the question is how practical is it to fix once you have to take the repair costs into consideration.

    I'll be honest, I think the guy that bought this guitar (sold for $800) got a fantastic deal. I was so tempted to buy it. My biggest concern was the crack in the body because it was in line with the grain and if it spread it could tear the whole thing in half. So that needs to be stabilized or at least have a pro look and say it's stable as is. The neck had to be reset, money but I think doable. So a luthier would have to spend some hours with the guitar to get it playable - and that's all I'd be looking for. But how much of an investment would that take? I just wasnt in a position to take on that level of financial risk but if the timing was a little different I'd have jumped on it. I wish you had been the guy the guitar went to, sounds like you would have been the type to make it sing again, an act of passion to bring it back and inspire you. I hope whoever did buy it bringer her back from the brink and preserves her for another generation.
     
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  19. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, what were they asking for that? Seems in the modern world people who post stuff for sale go to reverb or ebay, figure out what the most expensive similar ones are listing for, and ask that. I wouldn't be surprised if you told me he was asking a silly number given the damage.
     
  20. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    Fixing cracks typically only requires sandpaper, clamps, and tite bond glue- total being under 25$USD. Properly fixing the cracks will emsure its stability. Rather than pay a Luther, if you are concerned about a crack, post lots of pictures on here and the luthiers will give you sound advice. If a crack is too unstable then break it the reat of the way gently and follow the procedure for gluing it back on. The procedure is dead simple:
    1.sand to a particular grit (I go to 220,usually)
    2.test clamping the pieces back together before doing so with glue to ensure everything fits nicely.
    3.Clear surface of any debris and paint glue onto each piece generously but not dripping
    4. Align the peices properly and clamp. Be sure its all aligned properly, then let it dry and cure for 24 hours. Depending on what part you are gluong on you can definitely clamp it for less time but thats not advisable.

    Getting the finish back to a desirable condition is a whole nother thing but what I described above will work for majority of cracks and breaks in wood and make a guitar physically functional again. Im certainly not a pro by any means but I've spent way too much time tinkering with my instruments. There are at least a thousand Gibsons out there that go unappreciated, I love my Epi and other guitars but you know there's something about a brand sometimes thats so satisfying. My only justification for spending so much time, money and effort on music is that iys paid off already and eill continue to. Playing live is my main goal overall besides having a good time, I want to play to an audience and leave an impact on them one way or another.

    Edit: To reset a neck I would use a heatgun and paint scraper to gently melt the glue and ease the neck out so i could perform the gpueing procedure as noted above. None of these tools are very expensive or complicated. Overall i think most any damaged SG could be fixed at home with minimal tools for under $100 USD. There are some international users here so I mention that I mean USD. The time investment wpuld probabky be under 6 hours which aint that difficult if you do it little by little. Dont let the phantom costs of tools scare you away, corksniffers might not be able to bear an SG brought back from the dead but I sure can.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2019
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