Pink Neck Binding?

Discussion in 'Vintage SG' started by Steve D, Apr 8, 2019.

?

Did vintage SGs get pink neck binding?

  1. Heck yeah, all the time. That's just the way it was.

    0 vote(s)
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  2. Occasionally but it wasn't all that common.

    3 vote(s)
    60.0%
  3. What are you talking about? No way!

    2 vote(s)
    40.0%
  1. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Well-Known Member

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    An excellent idea for using a control!
     
  2. Chuteboxehero

    Chuteboxehero Active Member

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    I'll snap a pic and post it up for posterity once I'm done with work.
     
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  3. Chuteboxehero

    Chuteboxehero Active Member

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    [​IMG]
    It's kinda difficult to get a good picture of it. Definitely more noticeable in person. But this gives you the idea .
     
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  4. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    As someone else stated, this is the result of imperfect masking of the binding. Bleed could never stop perfectly along a straight line like that.

    I think you're probably right that they simply let the dyes and finish cure longer back in the '60s.

    One thing to consider on the Korina is that the clear coat will yellow with age. I know 2001 isn't that old, but I have a 1999 ES copy with noticeable yellowing on the binding. Also, Gibson likes to shoot a yellow tinted clear over binding sometimes to give it that aged look. My SG is Oxblood but the binding is uniformly yellow like yours. That certainly wasn't bleed!

    HPIM3905m.jpg

    As far as your Classics, those don't use Aniline dye like the Custom Shop models, that's why they haven't bled.
     
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  5. S.Ustain

    S.Ustain Active Member

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    I don't believe that Gibson ever used pink binding, so it's bleeding (or perhaps some other chemical reaction, but surely virtually always bleeding) that's the cause. Unfortunately, it's ugly. But it's historically correct, so doing the same thing on reissues makes sense, I guess, though I would not do it myself. The binding is usually scraped clear of red overspray before adding the clearcoat, which is where that visible red line comes from. They just didn't want to try to scrape exactly to the wood line. The yellowing effect is either aged lacquer or, often, amber lacquer used to create the look of an older finish. The bleeding is a defect in craftsmanship/materials (lack of curing + finishes that promote bleeding) but so it goes. Nothing's perfect, and this little quirk is apparently going to be memorialized in reissues forever. Unfortunately, IMO.
     
  6. grinch

    grinch New Member

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    Gender fluid binding. Don't judge :p
     
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