Play-wear on your loved-but-used sg?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Silverman, Jul 24, 2019.

  1. Silverman

    Silverman New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2019
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    9
    This may sound odd, but I was on the edge of buying a faded SG for a few years because of the impressionability of the finish. I'd never buy a relic job, but there has always been something alluring about a loved instrument physically reflecting "the work" you put in on her.

    I ended up the proud owner of an Autumn shade SG standard just last week (for pics, see my only other thread). It's great. I also understand that it has a nitro finish, though much less impressionable than its "faded satin" cousins. Do present-day SG standards show play wear like a pre-cbs Strat might?

    Show me! Please post a pic of the honest play wear of you most loved sg - faded, standard, or otherwise!
     
  2. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    3,190
    Likes Received:
    3,065
    Location:
    Kelowna B.C.
  3. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2018
    Messages:
    1,149
    Likes Received:
    1,183
    SG Special Faded

    [​IMG]
     
    Col Mustard likes this.
  4. brazilnut

    brazilnut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2013
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Weed, CA
    8 years of gigs...
     

    Attached Files:

    Col Mustard likes this.
  5. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    7,904
    Likes Received:
    7,923
    Location:
    Tucson AZ
    Welcome to ETSG! I don't think you can go wrong with an
    SG Standard... those to me are one of the best guitars Gibson makes.

    I do love my 07 faded brown SG Special... I bought it in 2008.
    Luna 6 crop.jpg
    I noticed right away that the finish is softer and thinner than any other
    guitar I'd ever seen or played.

    But I was already head over heels for this guitar, so I resolved just
    to protect it well. These guitars are easier to dent than most others,
    but the dents simply don't look out of place, IMHO.
    Luna controls 2_4x6.jpg
    The first one hurts, I confess... But I'm always hard on my things,
    bonking into stuff... my head is all covered with scars too.

    I fell arse over teakettle for this instrument, and played it a lot.
    I've had her for like 11 years now, and she's still the Queen of my
    music room. I named her Luna. She was my first SG and the
    cutaways made me mindful of the phases of the moon.
    rearview blonde neck@100.jpg
    You can see how blonde the back of the neck has become. I did rub this
    down gently with some steel wool, (outside, on a windy day, with the
    wind blowing the little steel bits AWAY from my pickups)
    but I've rubbed it more with my thumb and palm, going up and down.
    This would take a lot longer on a Standard with harder finish.
    Body Upper Bout@100.jpg
    About once a year I'll clean it well, oil the fretboard with "Fret Doctor"
    and rub the body down with "Howard's Feed n Wax" which is a product
    that antique dealers use to make old furniture look better. It's great on
    a faded SG. I have a couple of other guitars covered in Polyurethane,
    and this product (or any product) would do nothing for them. Just wipe
    those down with a bandana, and they're fine.
    On a glossy Gibson, just a little of Music Nomad's Guitar One will
    shine it up and protect the lacquer.
    wear 1@100.jpg
    Here's the rear upper bout, showing wear from my arm going up
    and down. This is what I mean about the softer and thinner finish.
    My faded cost me just over $600 new, and Gibson's SG Standards were
    going for almost twice that. The extra money for a Standard is mostly
    for the vaunted Gibson Deep Gloss, and inlays on the neck and headstock.
    If you can afford it, Gibson's got just the guitars for you.
    wear 2@100.jpg
    So the Gibson SG faded Special is the workingman's SG...
    It's got all the rawk and Kerang of it's more expensive cousins, but
    not the bling. And in the dimly lit clubs and roadhouses where SGs
    rule, who needs bling? Some do, and some don't... there's a place
    in the world for both IMHO.
    Above you can see wear on the forward upper bout, just beginning to be visible.
    Your Standard won't show this pattern for a long time.

    The Faded Special wears it well IMHO. Some of our other members have worn
    their worn finish SGs down much more severely than mine. It's just
    something to be aware of. I think honest battle scars and wear add a
    lot to a guitar's mojo. I don't think I'd buy an artificially reliced instrument, because I prefer to do the relicing myself, as I go...
    in the normal way. *laughs
    IMG_1097@100.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2019
    shreddy bender and brazilnut like this.
  6. brazilnut

    brazilnut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2013
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Weed, CA
    That's a right nice well used guitar, Col.
     
    Col Mustard likes this.
  7. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    3,190
    Likes Received:
    3,065
    Location:
    Kelowna B.C.
    Respect good sir! Luna is still a beauty! What's a little wrinkle? Experience... that's what!
     
    Col Mustard likes this.
  8. rotorhead

    rotorhead Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    773
    Likes Received:
    556
    Location:
    Jacksonville FL
    I've always loved honest wear and dings on guitars. "Reliced" ones make me puke. They remind me of kids in the 80s that bought new jeans and cut slits in them so they had rips. Or even worse, buying the pre-ripped jeans lol.

    Whether you start with a Standard or a Faded, the natural wear and scars of a well loved and well used guitar is a thing of beauty for me.
     
  9. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2019
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    462
    I tend to agree, I don't care for reliced guitars as a general rule. That said, I have a VOS SG and it has fake aging on the metal bits even though the finish is still reasonably glossy and I love the way it looks, it's just a hint of fake vintage and not over the top. I feel like with relic jobs, less is more.
     
    rotorhead likes this.
  10. Silverman

    Silverman New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2019
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    9
    I dig the look you have there. I think an sg without PU cover never looks quite right, and the dark chrome covers you picked out cut a neat contrast with the wooden pickguard.
     
    Col Mustard and cerebral gasket like this.
  11. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    7,904
    Likes Received:
    7,923
    Location:
    Tucson AZ
    thanks! SG Faded specials are plentiful and inexpensive
    and they make great mod platforms IMHO.
    When you buy a Standard, you don't really need to mod it,
    because it's already one of the best.

    I've modded this humble SG special with all the best of
    everything I could buy or make... like some ol' sugar-daddy
    indulging his mistress, who is much cooler than he will ever be.

    I think that SGs (or Les Pauls) with the covers removed from
    the pickups are supposed to look radical. Eric Clapton did this to
    his famous Les Paul, way back in the sixties, and guitarists seem
    to have never forgotten that. ...and they do look radical.

    Way back then, guitarists were on a quest to get more treble.
    They performed with NO MONITORS, (maybe some side fills)
    and mostly plugged straight in to their amps with those dreadful
    coil cords. So any little bit of more treble they could get might help
    them hear their signal over the noise of screaming fans.

    IMHO, there's no reason to do it now. In the Sixties, guitarists had
    NO PEDALS (or only rudimentary ones) to work with, and had to
    control their tone by using the tone controls on their guitars and
    amps. What a concept!

    These days, we have so much more controls and effects easily
    available at our feet, that modifying the guitar is mostly vanity,
    or illusion. If you hear a little mud in your tone, don't pull your
    guitar apart, just tweak your EQ a little and rock.

    But an SG with '57s is tone heaven to me.
     
    cerebral gasket likes this.
  12. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    2,967
    Likes Received:
    3,803
    I totally agree.

    [​IMG]
     
    bwotw, arcticsg and Col Mustard like this.
  13. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    7,904
    Likes Received:
    7,923
    Location:
    Tucson AZ
    To answer this question, one has to say: only time will tell.
    Pre-CBS Strats were built in excess of fifty years ago, so put fifty
    years of hard rocking on your new Gibbie and it will likely show
    some wear.


    Pre CBS Strats were built like a tank, very strong, very durable, very
    practical instruments. Leo Fender had a brilliant business plan:
    "I look at what kind of repairs are needed on my competitors' products
    and build mine so they don't require this."

    Fender guitars, basses and amps were all built like this...
    with the needs of the working pro musician in mind.
    Which is why Fender was able to muscle into the very
    competitive guitar market of the day, and succeed.

    Gibson guitars have always been built with an eye for elegance,
    which is reflected in the prices. The bluff practicality of Fender
    designs was alien to Gibson's thinking, and they made fun of Fenders
    until the sales figures shocked them into realizing they'd better pay
    attention. The Gibson SG was one of the results.
    April tall rig@100.jpg
    Still plenty of elegance, not built like a tank, but the SG is one
    of the most practical and useful instruments Gibson has ever
    invented, and sales figures prove this. SGs are built more like a
    nimble fighter aircraft, lighter, more fragile, but extremely effective.
    Snow White & Vox@100.jpg
    Gibsons and Fenders are different beasts, designed to serve the
    guitarist in different ways. Lucky us, that we have all this to choose
    from
    . I own a Mexican made Telecaster that seems to illustrate all
    the best of Fender's ideas. Excellent tone, perfect balance, great
    playability, hard durable polyurethane finish, reasonable price... I've
    owned this guitar for ten years and had almost no problems. Its
    finish shows little wear, few scratches, no dings... and I bought it used.
    SnowWhite Caledonia@100.jpg
    Gibson's Epiphone branch does this for them. They build the high priced
    Gibbies in the USA, and Epiphone sells their modest priced
    guitars worldwide, made in Tsingtao. They sell by the boatload.

    I have an Epiphone version of the Gibson ES-339 which I am
    also head over heels for. There's a place in the world for guitars like
    this, and also a place for their more elegant and expensive cousins.

    Which will be better after fifty years of hard use? I sure don't know.
    Only time will tell. Play it, Sam...
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
    brazilnut likes this.
  14. brazilnut

    brazilnut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2013
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Weed, CA
    Well, Colonel, how come nobody mentions one of Gibson's best creations, the Epiphone Elite/Elitist line? Those Fujigen guitars were really great high-quality axes, for much less $$. I had both an Elite LP and an Elitist SG Standard, and both of them together cost less than a new SG Standard. And they were really good axes, with no issues, great build quality, and superior playability. I kick myself for ever selling them.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice