Salvaged SG-2 project

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by 4wight, Sep 11, 2019 at 6:45 AM.

  1. 4wight

    4wight New Member

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    This is my latest ‘salvaged’ guitar project - a Gibson SG-2 from the early seventies which had been through the mill. Someone had filled in the neck pickup and there had also been problems with the bridge and stop tail posts, all four holes had been drilled out and filled with doweling. There were also chunks filled in the control cavity and in the bridge pickup route. Nothing was original on the guitar, except perhaps the strap buttons. The whole thing had then been painted black and passed off as a Jr, but the black paint had started to crack and come away, so all in all it looked a state. I sanded it down, and as there had already been so much alteration to the woodwork, I decided to give it a side output jack. As a nod to my favourite guitarist, John Cipollina, I sculpted a full batwing pickguard, which is mounted on small grommets similar to the raised pickguard of the original SG-1s and SG-2s. Surprisingly, despite the bridge posts being slightly out of alignment it plays and holds tune reallly well, and though it's essentially the same guitar as my (all original) SG-1, the neck feels nicer to play. I installed a Bill Lawrence L-100 pickup, which I think looks and sounds killer, and it is splitable to give a wider range of tone sg before and after1.jpg s. I created a new control cavity cover and put in a kill switch. Very happy with the result.
     
  2. Chuteboxehero

    Chuteboxehero Active Member

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    Nice work with that one! Went from borderline firewood to a nice looking guitar. Happy to see an old guitar get a new life.
     
  3. 4wight

    4wight New Member

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    Thanks. On the issue of the wood I have an SG-1 from the same period, and the only thing slightly wrong with it is that the bridge posts are leaning forward due to the pressure of the strings. This one obviously had that problem in spades as both sets of holes for the bridge and the tail piece seemed to be misshapen from string pressure. (This was one of the reasons for putting the Bigsby on - aside from the fact that I love a Bigsby on an SG, I thought it might provide a firm base for the strings.) The seeming softness of the wood makes me wonder if anyone else with an SG-1 or SG-2 has had similar problems with leaning bridge posts, and whether the wood used during this period was not as dense as at other periods - it certainly seems soft to me. (I have an Epiphone SG with a mahogany body that is so dense and so heavy it is almost impossible to put screws in without them snapping.)
     

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