SG and ES330 tuning problems

Discussion in 'Vintage SG' started by guitarman555, Mar 11, 2019.

  1. guitarman555

    guitarman555 New Member

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    Hey, I have a Tribute 1961 SG and a vintage ES330, both of them have tuning problems, just not enough space on the bridge to get to the tone at few strings. In Tribute 1961 I will probably solve it by putting the bridge vice versa, but in my vintage ES330 I ´ve already turned it opposite site and not enough space! It drives me crazy, any thoughts, eg. another bridge, or some ammendment of current bridge?
     
  2. Ray

    Ray Well-Known Member

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    Maybe worth swapping to Nashville bridges if those are ABR-1 bridges ..? IMO Nashville bridges are superior to ABRs, any day.
     
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  3. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    You mean you have problems with intonation, not individual string tuning ?

    Flipping the whole bridge won't get you anywhere, since half the saddles are facing the other side. Have you tried flipping around the saddles that don't intonate.

    You can get a bridge with wider saddle travel. I recently got this one for my LP Ultra in an effort to debling the gold on it.

    s-l1600.jpg

    V2 body 1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2019
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  4. guitarman555

    guitarman555 New Member

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    Many thanks, yes I am talking about intonation of some strings at higher frets adjustable by bridge saddles.
     
  5. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately with the ES-330, you may not be able to get a bridge with more space. I assume it's an ABR-1 bridge? There is currently no way to convert them easily to the wider Nashville style. I had to custom fabricate my own solution for my SG.
     
  6. guitarman555

    guitarman555 New Member

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    Why is not possible to change bridge on ES330? Thanks!
     
  7. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    The posts are different sizes and are installed differently. It would take a significant amount of work and devalue the guitar.
     
  8. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    The early Gibson guitars were designed in an age when guitar strings
    came in one gauge: heavy. So the solution to intonation problems on a
    "vintage" guitar is to use heavy gauge strings. .013s or larger...

    The Nashville bridge (and the Harmonica bridge before it) were designed
    as improvements that would help guitarists achieve proper intonation
    with lighter gauge strings. They work as designed, and give no
    trouble. If you want to use lighter gauge strings, more modern guitars
    are best.

    When you own a 'vintage" guitar, it's best to honor it with the strings
    it was designed for. When you want to modernize your tone, modern
    guitars work better.
     
  9. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    that said, I would recommend professional setup.
    Find the best luthier you can afford, and take your guitar (s) to him.
    (I'd pick the one that gives the most trouble, and get that one set up
    first). Explain and demonstrate the problem, and see if the luthier
    can't put it right.

    Lots of us do our own setup work, but a pro luthier has tools and
    measuring equipment that most of us don't own. When you have
    trouble like you are describing, you might need resources and experience
    that you don't have at home.

    Most Gibsons stay in tune just fine. We see a lot of posts on this
    subject anyway, and IMHO many times the OP is just overlooking the
    easiest solution. Pro setup... by the best luthier in your area... the one
    that pro guitarists trust with their fretwork and repairs.

    The solution might be as easy as flipping individual bridge saddles
    around so they face backwards and can get a tiny bit more rearward
    travel for the notch.
     
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  10. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Well-Known Member

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    Have you reversed the saddles as well to allow more travel?
     
  11. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    I never thought about that. Makes sense.
     
  12. Paul G.

    Paul G. Well-Known Member

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    Flip individual saddles. Most of mine are 3 treble strings facing forward, 3 wound strings facing backwards. My SG with ABR-1 is 2 high strings facing forward, G string facing backwards, D string facing forward, 2 bass strings facing backwards.
     
    flognoth and Thumpalumpacus like this.

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