SG bridge question

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by 515who, Aug 24, 2019.

  1. 515who

    515who Active Member

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    So here is my question. I’m interested in buying a 2016 Sg faded cherry. With all the fakes out there I’m always Leary. Well I always thought the posts for the bridge were solid. No holes as seen in the photo below. This one has holes. I’ve seen other photos of Sg guitars from that year with the same bridge type. The sg photos on tjebgibson website in 2019 are solid posts.

    Is this a legit Gibson bridge for a 2016 faded ? All signs seem to point to yes but I figured I should ask the experts here. Ty in advance.

    E0280661-12BF-4207-AEC1-790B7606195C.jpeg
     

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  2. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    Gibson went to allen head adjusters in 2015/16.
     
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  3. 515who

    515who Active Member

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    Thanks. It just looked off. I wanted to be sure. Appreciate the confirmation.
     
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  4. Paul G.

    Paul G. Well-Known Member

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    Yup, my 2016 LP Studio had those adjusters. Actually quite handy.
     
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  5. xscottx9

    xscottx9 New Member

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    I have been doing it wrong with my post 2014 Gibsons??/ .. I never knew!. I been spinning the adjustment wheel this whole time.
     
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  6. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    this is how you learn...
    (song title)
     
  7. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    I had not played an SG for years until 2016 and this was the one that got me back into them. Doesn't get anymore legit than that.

    2016 SG Faded

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
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  8. Huntroll

    Huntroll Active Member

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    Talk about minimal front side bevel on that lower horn !
    It must all be on the back necessitating maximum neck access.
    Because that horn sure looks thin !
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2019
  9. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

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    Same on my 2015 SG before Gibson ABR-1 upgrade:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    I usually play the neck of a guitar, not the bevels of the horns. No bevels on the horns pictured below and no problem with upper fret access from my experience.

    [​IMG]

    In addition, I never feel the need to swap out a perfectly functioning Nashville bridge for an ABR-1. In fact, I find that a simple Wraparound Bridge works just as well as any other type of bridge.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2019
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  11. koaguilds

    koaguilds Well-Known Member

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    We have the bevel and abr1 "upgrade" committee's to contend with my friends. It seems to be a modern trend because back in the early 80's nobody I ever knew compared SG bevels and thought they had to take off their Nashville to put on an old fashioned abr1. I think it's a computer age trend.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2019
  12. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

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    I prefer Gibson ABR-1 bridge because it' s better looking to me and more authentic.

    Both work fine.


    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I don't get it about the ABR-1 bridge.
    I don't know why anyone would be interested, or waste time
    and or money on installing one. Maybe if restoring an antique
    guitar. Otherwise I'm skeptical.

    It has less room for intonation, which is why it was replaced
    with the seventies harmonica bridge (which I believe was superior
    in function) and which was replaced in turn with the Nashville
    bridge.

    The Nashville bridge is what Gibson engineers came up with
    in order to accomodate players needs to install a variety of string
    gauges. The ABR-1 bridge was designed and manufactured in the
    dark dim days when guitar strings came in only one gauge: heavy.

    I've read many OCD posts about the tone-sucking characteristics
    of this alloy, or that, but none were convincing, and most sounded
    shrill and pointless. They make me skeptical.

    I've read posts about the tonal advantages of the even more antique
    wrap-over bridge. I've tried top wrapping my Nashville bridges, and
    seen very little difference. So I'm open minded, but skeptical.

    I mounted a Gotoh "Nashville" bridge on my Epiphone ES-339 and
    noticed an immediate improvement over the stock part. It's just
    better made, IMHO. And it has enough room to intonate 11s, or
    10s... and very likely even lighter gauges.

    So I'm for high quality parts that fit really well and give me the
    ability to intonate my guitar properly. Those factors are what I think
    are important in a bridge.
     
  14. gball

    gball Well-Known Member

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    Agree 100%. Nashville is a huge upgrade to ABR, which is of course why Gibson changed them. If I bought a guitar with an ABR the first thing I would do is change it out for a Nashville.
     
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  15. gball

    gball Well-Known Member

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    I know a lot of folks like the looks better. To me the ABRs look dainty and delicate compared to Nashville's (and in reality they are a lot more prone to failure).
     
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  16. Logan

    Logan Well-Known Member

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    I like floating wooden bridges.
     
  17. Paul G.

    Paul G. Well-Known Member

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    The main reason an ABR1 is better is because guitars with an OEM ABR1 screw the studs directly into the wood. Replacing a Nashville with an ABR1 and adapters doesn't change the fact that you are still screwing the studs into metal inserts.

    That being said, when I put new pickups on an SG, the ones I wanted came with nickel covers. The tuners were already nickel, and I had an 80s ABR1 (wire) and tailpiece in nickel removed from another guitar just sitting in a drawer. I bought adapter studs and installed them, along with a Creamtone wide bevel pickguard.

    I am very happy with the look of the guitar. Was there an improvement, or even a change in the tone of the guitar? Beats me. But it look marvelous to my eyes.

    _9050025_DxO.jpg
     
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