SG myth's (or truths)

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by cheshiergrin, May 6, 2018.

  1. cheshiergrin

    cheshiergrin Active Member

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    There are some things that I hear a lot, mostly on forums. Some of which I may have or have not bought in to. Some things get under my skin a little when you hear them over and over again. I am not talking about some one just not liking the look of a guitar, that I can at least respect. But list off your favorite SG Myth. Here is mine "the SG is only good for rock music".
    My argument is down below, Sorry if the guy playing seems to be an unskilled hack.
     
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  2. Saint Toad

    Saint Toad Member

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    Hey hey !
    I liked the clip.
    My take on the "myth/truth" thing......
    "Myth" = not sure if I have a favorite....too many people with too many opinions...feh.
    "Truth" = The SG is a versatile instrument....or musical TOOL. Lotsa color, lotsa sounds.
    It does seem to vary from player to player...(<----the REAL "Truth")

    -st
     
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  3. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Active Member

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    Myth: they break too easily at the headstock.
    Truth: Never had one break in my lifetime.
     
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  4. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    Myth: I sound like me on any guitar.
    Truth: I sound MOST like me on an SG.

    Myth: they neck dive.
    Truth: not if you play them.
     
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  5. cheshiergrin

    cheshiergrin Active Member

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    Myth you cant play jazz on an SG
    Truth this guy cant play jazz
     
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  6. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  7. cheshiergrin

    cheshiergrin Active Member

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    Pete Townsend was pretty hard on guitars
     
  8. Dave Johnson

    Dave Johnson Well-Known Member

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    Myth: Neck dive.
    Truth: Get a good strap or sit the f*&k down & play.
     
  9. lcw

    lcw Active Member

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    Myth: Neck dive.
    Truth: My 2011 Standard doesn’t neck dive.
     
  10. bwotw

    bwotw Well-Known Member

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    Myths: Don't sustain as much LPs, don't hold tune well, sound brighter than LPs because the SGs are thinner

    Truth: Having own about 6 or 7 SGs and LPs each tells me otherwise. It's a more delicate design than a LP (specially the 61 style, with the shorter joint, the slim profile and the big headstock) but they're otherwise pretty similar as far as sound, sustain and tuning stability go.

    Neck dive to me it's not a myth, the struggle is real. But a grippy strap (and ditching the heavy Grover style stuners) takes cares of it most of the time.
     
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  11. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Truth: That broken headstock pictured above was mine. A most unfortunate accident. Never had one break again.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2018
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  12. cheshiergrin

    cheshiergrin Active Member

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    We all know that there is a measure of fragility in the Gibson design. But it is not as though a stern look will cause a headstock to fly off. I (knock on wood) have not had this happen. I did see my cousin drop his epiphone on a tile floor and the headstock broke. But in all my years that's the only one I ever saw break. And I have seen quite a few hit the floor including my own.
     
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  13. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    I did happen to witness an SG on a floor stand behind the counter at a music store get knocked over accidentally. It landed squarely face down on the carpet floor. Fortunately the SG survived without any breaks.
     
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  14. pancake81

    pancake81 Active Member

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    I hate the headstock debate. Ultimately, yes the 17 degree headstock is both a superior and inferior design. My understanding is You are basically trading strength for sustain. Not a bad trade to a point, and I think Gibson found the right ratio. It’s not like a Gibson SG has ever “come apart” from playing. I mean, angus jumped off 8 foot cabinets for a life time, smashed it off symbols, dragged it on the floor etc, and those held up pretty dam good. Did he ever ruin guitar or crack necks, dam straight he did. But it was honest wear and hard playing, any guitar could have suffered the same demise.

    For you car buffs, I like to relate it to the corvette. In reference to the fiberglass body. Sure it not as strong as steel, but it’s a heck of a lot lighter, and this adds to performance and handling ability. People say, yeah, but if you hit a wall the **** just comes apart.

    I say, “yeah, but if you hit a wall with any car your probably headed into the body shop”.

    Will an SG neck break if you drop it. Maybe, but I don’t make a habit out of dropping my guitars. Therefor, I don’t buy a guitar based on the fact that it can handle being dropped better.

    Rant over :)
     
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  15. Saint Toad

    Saint Toad Member

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    Myth: Guitarists, (Especially SG owners), have Passionate opinions.
    Truth: Guitarists, (Especially SG owners), have Passionate opinions.

    :smile: :D

    -st
     
  16. Relic61

    Relic61 Well-Known Member

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    Myth: An SG Sounds less full & thinner than a Les Paul.

    Truth: Most of todays sealed pickups are simply reproducing the sound wave energy from right off the strings so.... the sound is mostly dependent on & affected by the pickups you are using & the amp & gear you are running your guitar through.

    And just to exercise the point here is an old thread that had various guitars pickups & tonewoods for us to listen to, evaluate & decide what guitar we thought was being played in each clip. Posted by Biddlin way back in 2015!

    Lots of fun, give it a shot.
    http://www.everythingsg.com/threads...red-i-can-hear-tonewoodies.28648/#post-402994
     
  17. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Active Member

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    I thought fiberglass was actually heavier on the Corvette, because the minimum buildable gauge was pretty thick till much later? Glass is 5 times lighter than steel, but I believe those fiberglass panels had to be much thicker than 5 times a steel panel? That was the rumor I heard growing up, that's why Corvettes were pretty heavy compared to other roadsters?
     
  18. Relic61

    Relic61 Well-Known Member

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    The earliest Corvette in 53 was relatively heavy due to large panels & being individually hand made, as in no tooling! Hey Bob! Just keep slapping that fiberglass on there until it looks strong enough!

    Hand made '53 Corvette premieres at Waldorf Astoria in Jan '53. below..
    [​IMG]

    Prototype Corvettes differed notably from the production versions – they were heavier, constructed with thicker Fiberglas, and formed as a one piece body. For production, the upper front and lower front, upper rear and lower rear body sections were joined and the rocker panels were glued and riveted to the assembled body. The resulting seam was hidden with bright trim. Hydraulically operated hood and trunk lids were installed for display purposes on at least the first prototype; these panels opened and closed as the show car revolved on its turntable.

    Due to the uncertainty of the Corvettes success (only 300 made in 53. In 1954, only 3,640 were built and nearly a third were unsold at year's end) Chevrolet held off on investing in tooling for body production causing these early Vettes to be rather thick in the fiberglass construction. As well as being fairly heavy, lots of the early Vettes had wavy panels & poor panel alignment that really became apparent once looked at closely.

    Below.. The Corvette and Corvette-based show cars pose together in Miami during February 1954. The “Hardtop” car joined the Motorama at this time. Note that the fastback Corvair is painted light green. A deep red Corvair was exhibited at the preceding Motorama in New York City.
    [​IMG]

    But, once the Corvette took hold & it's future looked secure lots of changes in technology & weight reduction were done through the years.
    Here's some advances..
    Corvette Body Timeline:
    • 1953 – Fiberglass layup
    • 1968 -Fiberglass press-mold
    • 1973 – Sheet Molded Composite
    • 1997 – Advanced SMC
    • 2004 – Carbon Fiber components
    • 2014 – Hand-laid unicorn hair/Chuck Norris tears composite
     
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  19. Logan

    Logan Well-Known Member

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    Myth: Gibson guitars have poor quality control.
    Fact: I own 5 and not one had any MAJOR issues.

    Myth: SGs have less sustain than a Les Paul.
    Fact: They sustain the same as each other.

    Myth: SGs are brighter than Les Pauls.
    Fact: SGs have more harmonic content on the neck pickup due to where the pickup is placed. Bridge pickup is the same on both guitars.

    Myth: SGs are only good for rock.
    Fact: SGs are only as good as the person playing them.​
     
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  20. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Let's face it: a closed mind is nothing to be proud of.
    It's too bad that closed minded individuals seem to take charge
    of everywhere, and spew poison. We do well to ignore them, and
    play music on our SGs.

    Myth: SGs are fragile and easily broken...
    Truth: SGs are lightly built and more easily broken than Telecasters (which are
    built like a tank). But every Gibson guitar, and any other guitar with a mahogany neck and a 17 degree back angle is vulnerable at the headstock. >Les Pauls break easily there, as do ES-335s and J-45 acoustics... it's where the grain of the mahogany is weak. SGs can also break right where the jack is, because the mahogany is weakened by the routs for the controls.
    >We get our awesome tone in part from the back angle at the headstock, and we love the light weight of our SGs. The price for that is (to quote Prof. Moody)
    CONSTANT VIGILANCE! We need to take good care of our baby.

    Myth: Gibsons suck, because they are overpriced and their quality is less than
    their owners expect after paying so much.
    Truth: I own three Gibson guitars, each of which has had no quaility issues.
    Each is packed with Gibson elegance, awesome tone, beautiful build and finish, and excellent parts as issued.
    I paid about $600 for each of my two SGs, and I paid $1600 for my new
    J-45. NONE of my three was overpriced. Each one seemed like such a good
    deal that I felt I had to pounce. Mine are worth much more than I paid IMHO.
    ...To me, anyway.

    Myth: The only good Gibson is an old one.
    Truth: People have been saying that since I first grew hair on my upper lip,
    (about 1961)... People have always said that. If you can believe that they said
    this about Sixties Gibsons... I remember that they did. In the sixties, people
    dissed the new-fangled SG, and said that only Gibson guitars of the thirties
    and forties were any good. In the '70s, people said that only sixties Gibsons
    were any good, and that '70s Gibsons were AFU... They kept saying that all
    through the eighties and nineties, and no one had any respect for a new Gibsons either. By the early oughts, people began to admit that maybe a few
    of the '70s Gibsons were okay, but NONE of the new ones had any soul or
    quality. It just goes on and on, and it's all bull-taco.
    >More truth: Gibsons of any era included good ones and some dogs.
     
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