SG new build

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Silvertone, Oct 13, 2018.

  1. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Here is the veneer cut with the pockets.
    [​IMG] -



    And the inlays. I forgot about grain orientation when I cut the crown inlay so I flipped it 90 degrees and cut it out again below.

    [​IMG]


    piecing them together.

    [​IMG]


    They fit perfectly. I offset by 0.0025" and they slid in perfectly. Glued and scraped clean -

    [​IMG]


    Close up -

    [​IMG]


    Cheers Peter.
     
  2. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    And one for the walnut bodied guitar -

    [​IMG]


    Cheers Peter.
     
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  3. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Twinsees!

    [​IMG]


    Cheers Peter.
     
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  4. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    I trimmed up my head stock veneer and thickness planed it down to just under 1/16". I stuck it to a flat piece of maple and stuck it down and slowly took it down the the correct thickness.

    [​IMG]


    Then I stuck my head stock down to my router table and spread glue on the head stock.

    [​IMG]


    Clamped it all up and it should be good in a few hours.


    [​IMG]


    Cheers Peter.
     
  5. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Unclamped. It looks OK. I over sized the veneer by about 1/16" all the way around. I put it back on the router table and trimmed to the edge of the head stock with a top bearing router bit. I also cut out the hole for the truss rod. I still have to spend some time on the points of the open book and the centre of the open book. I try to be really careful with the template / pattern bits and those corners can explode if caught on an uphill cut. I usually just leave them and then file and use sand paper to final dimension. I will also place a little block above the truss rod adjuster so I can have a two screw truss rod cover.

    [​IMG]


    I might use some pins for the next one. I'd just have to work out a different caul, I guess, or use some small wood dowels for locators that get drilled out when I drill for the tuners.


    Cheers Peter.


    PS - as a tip for anyone adding a veneer like this, or especially if you are using a thick one, make sure to oversize it to the nut side because you want the edge of the veneer to meet the nut at the same angle as the nut, not the same angle as the head stock. I left about 1/32" so I can mount my board and then file the slot exactly the right size to accept my nut which should be about 3/16" thick.
     
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  6. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    So I cleaned up the head stock and added filler pieces at the nut and the other end of the neck. I think next time I will cut the opening for the truss rod access on the CNC machine and put the rod before gluing on the veneer. I glued in a filler piece but I marked the edges with pencil and I didn't erase the pencil lines before gluing in the filler. I have dark lines on the edges of the strip. Most of it will be covered with the truss rod cover but it would've been easily remedied had I remembered to erase the pencil or just cut a hole in the veneer and put the filler strip in first. Live and learn. ;-)

    [​IMG]


    I've been experimenting with different ways of gluing on fret boards. I have fretted first and then glued and also glued and then fretted. This time I drilled small indexing holes at the first fret and the last fret. I was going to use brad nails snipped off but decided to use tooth picks and cut the tops off. Test fit.

    [​IMG]


    I taped off the truss rod and applied fish glue then peeled off the tape. I used my 18" aluminum radius beam for a caul and a cork neck rest on the back and some C clamps.

    [​IMG]

    The fish glue is pretty runny so I wiped off most of the excess and used wax paper on the cauls. The seem looked pretty good. The binding is quite thick and sits about 1 mm outlside the edge of the neck. I'll shape the neck and binding edge after the glue is all dry. This seems to be a good way to ensure I get all the squeeze out off the neck. I do have it upside down on the work bench so hopefully not much will get onto the neck.


    Cheers Peter.
     
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  7. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Un-clamped and scraped the edges a bit. I have the binding a little thick still but contoured the transition and will take a little bit off the edges before fretting.

    [​IMG]


    quick mock up -

    [​IMG]


    I also spent a little bit of time on the body. I filed and sanded some of the places where I touched up the epoxy and also drilled the wire channel. I'm always worry about the bit coming out the back or the top when I do this but it all worked out fine. I have 4 or 5 long bits of different sizes and start with the small and work my way up.


    [​IMG]


    Here is the light at the end of the tunnel! ;-)


    [​IMG]


    Cheers Peter.
     
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  8. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    Exquisite work! Helps to always have the right tool for the job. That grain pattern is lovely. I can't wait to see them when theyve reached completion, your work is inspiring.
     
  9. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Thanks - Yes it is always good to have the right tool for the job. There is also something to be said for planning every process thoughly before proceeding. If you do not have the correct tool this is even more important.

    For instance, it is very tricky to have a seamless joint between the neck and the fret board. It is also difficult to keep that a nice crisp straight line. I make my binding over sized so that I can shape after gluing it down to the neck. It is very obvious if the binding is a little thinner in one area viewing from the top of the fret board. By over sizing my binding I can blend with the bottom of the neck and have a nice crisp straight line on top. Here is a section through the neck that shows the binding is shaped into the neck.
    Capture.JPG

    These are the little things that make a DIY project look professional. These are also the little details that you could have every tool in the world and still build something that looks like crap. This is what I love forums like this for. I have learned tons of things like this from members here and on other forums that consistently make my projects turn out better.

    Cheers Peter.
     
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  10. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Incredible workmanship Peter.

    I would have gone with a colored dye in the epoxy filling the gaps in that body. Like a transparent blue would have looked killer. It would have made it that much special.

    But that's me ...
     
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  11. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    I completely agree. Thank you for posting such insightful information and inspiring pictures, I cant wait to see the results!

    Have you ever made a natural stratocaster by chance?

    Also, what do you think about Languedoc guitars? Ive been intruiged lately by Trey Anastasios custom Languedocs.
    Agreed!
     
  12. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    I spent a little more time with the body this afternoon. I changed out the aggressive grit in my thickness sander for a finer grit and sent my body through a few times. I had drop filled a few spots on the body earlier in the week. I then went to town on the edges and the bevels. There was some epoxy to knock down and some pretty deep scratches from I'm not sure what. It's looking much better now. I have a few specialty tools I use for this process as well. I have one of those Stew Mac dragon files, and a couple of other files and then just a couple of grits of sand paper as well. I also have one of my favorite tools for sanding the edges of a guitar. It's a pneumatic drum sander. It's an air filled bladder with a roll of sandpaper around it. You chuck one end in your drill and the other is a handle. It makes short work of the edges of the guitar.

    [​IMG]


    I worked on the bevels as well. Shaping with the dragon file, smoothing the heavy scratches with the flat / half round file, then on to sand paper.

    [​IMG]


    I'm waiting on a fret press arbour from Stew Mac which will be delivered tomorrow so I can press in the frets. Then we'll be on our way. Thanks for watching.


    Cheers Peter.
     
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  13. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Hey, thanks for showing !
     
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  14. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    No problem. Every once in a while I have these minor epiphanies which helps immensely with building. I like to share those as I'm sure there are a lot of people out there that are struggling with the same thing.

    For instance, and this may be common knowledge for a lot of wood workers but, I just realized that I really only need a few tools to shape wood. That Dragon hand rasp is great for taking material very quickly. The problem here is the deep scratches that it leaves. The solution is a finer file that takes those scratches out easily and leaves finer scratches that I can then just sand out with 60 or 80 grit paper. Then it's just a matter of working my way up the grits in that area. I was surprised how quickly I could shape and then get to a nice smooth surface. The tip would be to find the right set of tools that make this go quickly. Also, and this goes for sanding finish as well. Rotate the direction of your sanding when you move up a grit so you can see when the scratches from the previous grit are gone. Once you see all the scratches that are 90 degrees to the way you are sanding are gone you know you are done and can move up.

    I know I used to spend a huge amount of time filing / sanding because I was using too fine a tool. I didn't want to screw it up with an aggressive tool. I guess that is the learning part and something that luthiers and general wood workers would know subconsciously.

    Cheers Peter.
     
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  15. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    So I received a package today. Huge box with a smaller but very heavy box on the inside. Unpacked and ready to press.
    IMG_6335.JPG

    I do not think I would have spent this kind of money on this piece of equipment but I built some cabinets for a friend of mine and she sent me a $1000 Stew Mac gift card. I'm sure it will work quite well but I do not particularly like the design and the fit and finish is absolutely horrible. Talk about cheaply made. The paint is all chipping off. The casting looks like it was cast in a playdoh mould. It will not sit flat on the workbench because there is a clamp that goes under the front. Silly design flaw IMO. Oh well once I make a purpose built jig for it to sit on, it should be fine.

    Cheers Peter.
     
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  16. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Just noticed yesterday that I hadn't done the side dots yet. So while I was waiting for some fret boards to be machined in my CNC machine, I drilled and glued in some black plastic rod material. I think it should be fine. I also noticed I haven't drilled tuner holes.

    [​IMG]


    Once they are dry I'll file them flush and move onto the head stock tuner holes. I also filed all the fret tangs so I am ready to press in the frets.


    Cheers Peter.
     
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  17. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Cleaned up the dots and sanded a bit.

    [​IMG]


    I also cut the end of the neck tenon to fit with the pickup route. I just used a pull saw and some chisels and sand paper to finish up. Man, there isn't much wood left on that tenon. I hope it's gonna hold up OK. Clearly the '61 design had some challenges.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Got out some tools and my set of tuners to drill those out.

    [​IMG]


    I usually drill right through the head stock with a 1/4" brad point drill bit. I try and use a block as backup so I do not get much tear--out. Although drilling the 1/4" hole right through allows me to use a pilot bit to make the hole the correct size and also cleans out any tearout as well.


    [​IMG]


    Cheers Peter.
     
  18. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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    Finished up the last of those fret boards for my friend and drilled the right sized holes with my pilot reamer bit. This is a great tool. No worries about tear out and you get the exact size needed.

    [​IMG]


    Flipped over and sized the front.


    [​IMG]


    Tuner installation. I still have to drill for screw holes but gotta get to work. I threw on a truss rod cover to get a bit of a mock up. Should be nice.


    [​IMG]


    Clearly I need some more truss rod covers. Anyone know where I can get somewhat inexpensive bell covers? I do not need vintage correct or even bell shape for that matter. I guess I could just cut my own out of walnut.


    Cheers Peter.
     
  19. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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  20. Silvertone

    Silvertone Active Member

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