SGI and the 500T

Discussion in 'Pickups' started by Tan, Dec 23, 2004.

  1. Tan

    Tan New Member

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    Just purchased a SGI and I find the 500T very high pitched, almost shrill.
    The tone pot doesn't seems to cut the highs either, but alter the tone in a way I never experienced in a Gibson before.
    Is this the proper way for a SGI to behave?
     
  2. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    it can be.... depending on the tone pot, volume pot, tone cap and the way its wired
     
  3. ess

    ess Guest

    aint the 500t ceramic? might explain it., :?:
     
  4. Tan

    Tan New Member

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    Yes, the 500T is ceramic
    What's the differens of alnico and ceramic?

    Did some googling on "ceramic vs alnico":
    This one's from Bill Lawrence's site:

    "When I read that ceramic magnets sound harsh and alnico magnets sound sweet, I ask myself, " Who the hell preaches such nonsense?" There are harsh-sounding pickups with alnico magnets and sweet-sounding pickups with ceramic magnets and vice-versa! A magnet by itself has no sound, and as a part of a pickup, the magnet is simply the source to provide the magnetic field for the strings. The important factor is the design of a magnetic circuit which establishes what magnet to use. "

    And another one:

    "This is an old discussion among guitar players and pickup makers who are into "vintage" hardware.
    The usual belief is that Alnico V sounds "sweeter" in a pickup and ceramic is harsh. I've heard people say it depends on the design and not the magnet...flux is flux.
    My question is that if Alnico V has lower coersivity, I believe meaning it has less resistance to change in flux (?), as the guitar string disrupts the field. wouldn't this have an effect on the sound produced? Wouldn't a more radical change in the flux affect other factors i.e.induced voltage in the coil, inductance, capacitance etc. Could this be what the so called "vintage" sound is? I don't think the difference in density has much to do with it as the string to pole piece distance is adjustable...I could be wrong.
    Not really understandig this my thinking says that more change = more musical character - less change = stiffer / harsher tone. (good for Heavy Metal players)"

    Your opinions welcome.

    Tan
     
  5. ess

    ess Guest

    i spose its down to the winding. the early Pafs with A2 were just wound by eye, no counts. Ive read that its the luck of the draw if you get a sweet sounding PAF., cuz there are dogs out there also.

    the interaction between the unmatched coils in them is another thing to add to the timeless quest. the magnet question is just one of many to make your head spin.
     
  6. dcooper

    dcooper Member

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    I got one in my explorer, I don't like it either. I'm replacing it. to bright also, very high output though. not a fan of ceramic pickups IMO
     
  7. paradox

    paradox Active Member

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    The 500T is gibsons "Hottest" pickup and I guess a lot of that is top end. I like the 490R bridge and the 498T combination, however I been playing the '57s in the 61RI lately and I think I'm leaning towards liking them just as much. I also like pulling the covers off every pickup I own because I think you get a little more highs/different sound.

    Does that SGI have a coil tap switch on it, maybe somethin's not right with that.

    I almost bought the 496R/500T combination for the 61RI and since I'm hearing alot of negative things about the 500T I'm glad I didn't.
     
  8. Tan

    Tan New Member

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    Yes there's a coiltap and tapping the pup makes it even more high pitched, like country picking on acid. Actually I do like the overall sound of this guitar but it's very different from my Special or Classic. I'm sure it'll cut like a knife thru the rest of the band even with heavy distortion, witch's probably the idea of this pup anyway. :twisted:
     
  9. Tan

    Tan New Member

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    Here they are
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][/img]
     
  10. dcooper

    dcooper Member

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    Tan, I see the whole gang are there for the holidays. Nice looking guitars
     
  11. Strange Brew

    Strange Brew Well-Known Member

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    Tasty trio, Tan :)
     
  12. vic108

    vic108 Well-Known Member

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    Nice herd of fiddles!

    I did not like the 500T pup at all on a FLYING V that I ordered over the internet (sight unseen).

    It was WAY TOO HOT!
    And I never thought I'd think that ever!
     
  13. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    There are some considerations with magnets that Lawrence didn't completely tell.

    One is - that the stronger magnet has a stronger pull on the strings. Some guys get the pickups, regarless of type, very close to the strings, others back away a bit. The tone does change depending on the distance to the string (and the output changes too, naturally).

    But, with strong magnets and pickups close to the strings - the pickups themselves are starting to alter how the string vibrates. Fender, semi correctly, warns against getting their Tejas Especiales too close to the strings, but they fail to consider the gauge of the strings and just give a general guideline.

    Sometimes - like in Gibsons old "super humbucking" pickups, ceramic magnets were used and combined with an underwound coil. The result was decreased DC resistance, brighter tone, and about the same output as the "regular" humbucker. The Super's used three ceramic magnets BTW.

    So, not only do you have strength, but coil size, wire gauge, etc etc all to consider.
     
  14. satinsixstring

    satinsixstring Member

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    I never liked the 500T.

    Drove me crazy in my flying v as well.
     
  15. hambucker

    hambucker Member

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    Are the pots 500K? Maybe you should try 300Kor even 250 to warm it up a bit. I've got an SG-X, same guitar, and I think it's got 300K pots. Iwas thinking of going to 500.
     
  16. CharlieB

    CharlieB Active Member

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    Ya know another "trick" is to just put series resistance in the pickup. That will decrease the treble a bit.

    The way to do it is to literally take a resistor (carbon film works good here) and insert it inline between the pickup lead, and the volume control. That way, all the signal goes thru the resistor. The controls will change character a little, and you'll have to try different resistors. You could temporarily take a 1meg pot and use the center and end leads... and some jumper wires... and see what sounds and works well, then just get a resistor that is real close in value to what the pot was set as. The wattage on the resistor can be nil, but get a half watt one just for strength (mechanical) sake.
     

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