Short Scale Guitars- opinions?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars' started by Layne Matz, Dec 11, 2019.

  1. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    I bought an old 60s classical guitar of an unknow brand recently, unknowing that it was a short scale. It took me all of 5 minutes to figure out it was a shorter scale as the previous classical I played was 26'. The exact scale length measurement is 23.4'. I have no problem with this, particularly becuase I've heard how Byrdlands are preferred by lots of players due to the shorter scale length. All the same, I'll be getting a standard classical sooner or later.

    This one is great but its limiting in some ways, particularly in regards string tension and flamenco. Still sounds excellent.

    Note: arent PRS Santana models scale length 24'?

    23.4 cant feel all that much different than 24' i assume. The difference between 25' and 25.5 is remarkably subtle IMO.

    20191029_135934-1-1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
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  2. arcticsg

    arcticsg Well-Known Member

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    Yep, 12 fret vs 14 fret. Bridge is also set further from the bottom of the sound hole on a 12 fret guitar.
     
  3. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    There are some tonal advantages to be had from
    playing a 12 fret guitar... but I've never done it.
    I'm happy with the tones I get from 14 fret guitars.

    IMHO the shorter scale might be designed for a young
    guitar student, and a full grown guitarist might prefer a
    larger instrument. I've seen recitals with guitar
    students performing flawlessly even though they are
    only four or five years old. I usually frown on this, and look harshly at the parents... wondering what dreadful things they do to these kids to force them to practice enough to achieve this level of perfection at this young age.
    170325GuitarEnsemble01TS.JPG
    grrrrrr.....

    But anyway, enjoy your new instrument, and don't forget
    to show us a few more pictures.
     
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  4. arcticsg

    arcticsg Well-Known Member

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    Remember before 1930, the 12 fret, gut string, acoustic was the standard, and that's all Martin produced.

    Thanks Martin for producing and popularizing the 14fret, steel string, acoustic guitar. :smile:
     
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  5. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Neck size, scale, year, finish color, bevels, ABR-1 vs Nashville, etc does not matter. Just get used to it and play.


    Shoe size also doesn’t matter. If they don’t have your size in stock, just get whatever is available and get used to it.
     
  6. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    yes, thanks Martin indeed... I believe that Martin originated the "dreadnought" guitar in like 1916.
    The Dreadnought was named for a famous British Battleship from a decade before, but the name
    still inspired respect, so they used it for their big body guitar.
    HMS_Dreadnought_1906_H61017.jpg
    Steel strings, jumbo body, 14 frets... it was intended for band players to have a louder guitar, because
    bands of the day featured brass and reed instruments in the front line, and the guitarist was
    relegated to the rhythm section and hung out next to the bass player.

    Oh yeah, and frogs have no neck...
     
  8. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    PRS Santana models are 24 fret not 24 inch scale length. From my research, it seems they are 24.5 inch length. Custom 22 and 24's are 25 inch
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2019
  9. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    Now when I think of short scale length guitars, the first ones I think of are Byrdlands

    The Byrdland is indeed a shorter scale length than most other guitars: 23-1/2″, compared to Gibson's usual 24-3/4″ and Fender's usual 25-1/2″. It is a thinline hollowbody that was introduced in 1955. The first few years featured P90 pickups with Alnico V magnets, later PAF and patent humbuckers were used.
     
  10. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    This guy did reasonably well with a short scale guitar:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. NoiseNinja

    NoiseNinja Member

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    I like short scale acoustics, and got a nylon string classical acoustic short scale guitar myself, and short scale basses as well, my mains are a 5 string and a 4 string 28,6" scale Ibanez Mikro.

    But for electrical guitars anything less than 24,75" simply gets way too cramped for me.

    24,75" seems to be just the right size for me when it comes to electric guitars, and I love my cheap, but non the less great, Epiphone SG Special.
     

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