The birth of loud

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by GrumpyOldDBA, Feb 14, 2019.

  1. GrumpyOldDBA

    GrumpyOldDBA Well-Known Member

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    I bought the new book The Birth Of Loud its kind of a combined biography of Fender Les Paul and Bigsby with history of how electric guitars were developed. A fair amount of focus too on different other artists and how this whole amped up sound became so popular.

    I like the writing and the approach. Les Paul apparently not the most honest person ever. Bigsby had first real guitar apparently.

    Im maybe a third through i recommend the book its more enjoyable than i would have guessed.
     
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  2. Ray

    Ray Well-Known Member

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    Oooh! Sounds like a must! And oooh, what a great title. ..birth of loud.
    To be read on 11!
    PS. Lester just didn't get it, did he? Hehe.
     
  3. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Active Member

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    Les was a self-promoting musician and tinkerer as well as the guy in several situations who came up with the key idea that broke the creative log-jam and made the process take off. A combination of his working in a very fertile time with many people in close quarters working towards the same goals and a typical self-promoter's aggressiveness and lack of memory detail makes his claims um, worthy of circumspection.

    I've dealt with many, many of this type. For example, I have a friend, a really nice guy, who is an aggressive composer, engineer, producer. Everyone loves to work with him except in one phase: when it comes time to publish the credits he just can'r seem to remember how things were composed (as in WHO participated in composing) or who-played-what. There's no attempt to defraud, he is just ditzy, ends up with false memories, and claims the world. When confronted, he is humble enough to apologize and do what he can but it is usually too late. I think Les was like that but too aggressive and busy self-promoting to get around to admissions and apology.

    Bob
     
  4. GrumpyOldDBA

    GrumpyOldDBA Well-Known Member

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    It looks like Leo Fender stole a bunch of stuff from Bigsby also ...

    Ian Port is the writer wow a lot of research he really tries to get into the head of all three people involved and calls it as he sees it.
     
  5. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Well-Known Member

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    Paul's definitely the unsung guy in the development of the electric guitar. First slab body, first six-on-a-side headstock, of course his vibrato system.
     
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  6. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    It Might Get Loud
     
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  7. GrumpyOldDBA

    GrumpyOldDBA Well-Known Member

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    Well I am all the way through the book have just a few pages left in the epilogue to finish.

    I enjoyed it a lot although skimmed a fair amount if topics/personalities being talked about were not that interesting to me.

    A really well done book good writing dang a ton of research to pull all of this together. I kind of thought I knew a fair amount of the history of Fender and Gibson. Not so much apparently but now ( until I forget it ) its so fascinating.

    I recommend this book!
     
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  8. jtees4

    jtees4 Well-Known Member

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    I always knew about the Bigsby connection, but it has been downplayed for many years, in fact I used to argue with internet folks who didn't really know about it....this book was really good and also seems accurate from all the things I've heard or known over the years. A good read!!! For guitar players that like to read about guitars (like me) I'd also recommend The Strat in the Attic, and The Grail guitar: The search for Jimi Hendrix's Purple Haze TELECASTER. I can't get enough guitar reading. :thumb:
    oops, I originally said Purple Haze Stratocaster, it is TELECASTER...that's what makes the book interesting.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
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  9. SG standard

    SG standard Well-Known Member

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    There's a great interview with Ted McCarty on Reverb - Tony Bacon did it in 1992. He describes taking a prototype of the (soon-to-be) Les Paul to show to Les and Mary. He also mentions the only thing that Les then contributed was the short-lived tailpiece: The only change... we had a regular trapeze tailpiece, and Les came up with the idea, instead of having the strings hooked into the tailpiece, he had a solid steel bar wrapped around. He liked that, so we changed to it—we made them that way. Then a few years later we went away from that to the one they call the McCarty bridge and tailpiece, which has the studs—you could move it.

    The whole interview is a good read.
     
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