Tuners for G400

Discussion in 'Epiphone SG' started by Charles jr Quinn, Aug 18, 2018.

  1. Charles jr Quinn

    Charles jr Quinn New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    What good replacement tuners would fit without using a reemer on a G400 ??

    Ex : Groover Vintage ??

    Thanks..
     
  2. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2016
    Messages:
    455
    Likes Received:
    361
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    There's only two sizes as far as I know, just take one of yours out and measure the hole.

    If you don't mind me asking, why are you changing out the tuning pegs?
     
  3. Charles jr Quinn

    Charles jr Quinn New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    The stock ones dont keep my SG in tune..
     
  4. Protismo

    Protismo New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2018
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    2
    maybe a proper setup would help.. im using stock grovers and took my sg to a technican he sorted it out and it stays perfectly in tune i think your better off just getting a setup ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2018
    Col Mustard likes this.
  5. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2012
    Messages:
    10,315
    Likes Received:
    8,342
    Location:
    -
    Tuners are almost never the problem with a guitar staying in tune. As Protismo says, a good set up is where I would start.
    If you are not conversant with tools and general maintenance, take it to a pro. If you feel competent to perform some basic mechaniacl adjustment, here goes:

    Lubricate your nut slots with lead from a #2 pencil. With a new set of strings tune to your normal tuning.(i.e. if you usually play in double drop D that's where you want to set the neck and saddles.) Retune after every adjustment.
    Begin by setting the bridge height for frets 17-22 so that the strings play buzz free at the lowest possible height.

    I start with low E. Lower until it buzzes, raise until clear.Then do the high E the same way. I bend notes up here, so I try a few typical bends on the high strings, to make sure they don't buzz out.

    When all strings play clean, I go to the lower frets and neck relief. Play the high E string from fret 1 to fret 16, increasing relief (loosening trussrod-turn counterclockwise by 1/16th turn) to relieve buzz or decreasing relief (tightening trussrod-turn clockwise by 1/16th turn) to lower the string height. So tighten, by fractional turns, until it buzzes and back off until it doesn't. I bend strings , so I do typical bends to insure they don't buzz out. Once satisfied, I check the other strings and make small adjustments as needed.

    Once I have acceptable relief, i.e. no buzz and easy action, I set my intonation and I'm done.
     
    dub-setter, Protismo and Col Mustard like this.
  6. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    1,458
    Likes Received:
    1,537
  7. iblive

    iblive Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,367
    Likes Received:
    882
    Location:
    North East Illinois
    What Biddlin said. I had tuning and intonation issues on my G400 as well. Swapped the stock bridge and tail piece for a TonePro set and my problems went away. Now I did at a later time swap the tuners for a set of Gibson Deluxe. But I did it for aesthetic reasons not function the stock tuners were working just fine.
     
  8. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    6,903
    Likes Received:
    6,392
    Location:
    Michigan
    Welcome to ETSG, Charles Quinn!

    I'll answer your original question by suggesting that a set of Gotoh
    tuners will be what you wanted, an easy and not too expensive replacement
    set for your Epiphone G-400.

    https://www.philadelphialuthiertools.com/guitar-tuning-machines/

    I installed a set of these on my Epiphone ES-339 P-90 pro, not because
    the stock tuners were bad but because I simply wanted black, and I was upgrading
    everything else on that instrument. The Gotoh machines fit right into place easily
    on the Epi.

    The best reason to replace stock tuners on a G-400 is the weight....
    Many G-400s are issued with Grover Rotomatic tuners, which are too
    heavy for an SG and upset the balance, causing irritating neck dive.
    Gotoh tuners will help if your guitar is headstock heavy.
    Caledonia headstock@100.jpg
    I agree with others on this thread: Tuning machines are not very often the
    problem when your guitar won't stay in tune. My first question about
    guitars that won't stay in tune is: how old are the strings?

    When in doubt: Swap them out. Old dead strings will NOT stay in tune.
    That's how you know it's time to change them. *grins

    The next reason guitars won't stay in tune, or are difficult to tune, is lack of
    lubrication in the nut slots, or improperly cut nut slots. Pencil graphite works
    as do some of the commercial nut slot and gear lubes sold for guitars. I use
    a home made mixture of vaseline and powdered graphite. A tiny dot on a toothpick
    is enough for a nut slot (or a bridge slot, or under the string tree on a Fender).
    So a tablespoon of this mixture ought to last a decade.

    Biddlin's post ought to be a sticky... because this is one of the best
    ways for a player to set the action on his guitar without buying and
    owning expensive luthier tools that rarely get used. Biddlin's method works well
    for many of us, and gives you a guitar that plays like a dream, as long as your
    frets are level and your nut slots are cut properly.

    Leveling frets and cutting proper nut slots are jobs for the best luthier you can
    find, because there is some skill needed and also some precision tools needed in
    order to do the job right.
     
    In Tampa and Biddlin like this.
  9. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2012
    Messages:
    10,315
    Likes Received:
    8,342
    Location:
    -
    Don't curse me, here, Col. The last site that made it a sticky banned me the next week for not contributing enough.
     
  10. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2016
    Messages:
    455
    Likes Received:
    361
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    The reason I asked has been explained very well by fellow forum members above.

    Tuning issues are usually not the fault of the tuning machines. Use the string wrap technique show above, get a proper setup, lube the nut, and you should be fine.
     
  11. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    6,903
    Likes Received:
    6,392
    Location:
    Michigan
    Oh yes and our Cerebral Gasket posted an illustration above of the
    "self locking method" of installing strings... using the string's own
    tension to lock it. If you master and use this method, locking tuners
    are unnecessary. The guitar stays in tune much better than before.

    Highly recommended.
     
    cerebral gasket likes this.
  12. Charles jr Quinn

    Charles jr Quinn New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Will do, i'll take it to the tech and go from there, thanks guys :-)
     
  13. dub-setter

    dub-setter Active Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2013
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    berlin
    yap..

    those stock grovers are fine and do the job well,
    im also more tending to check out nut/bridge/ string slots...
     
  14. Charles jr Quinn

    Charles jr Quinn New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Started with the nut, went with th Graph Teck..
     
  15. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    6,903
    Likes Received:
    6,392
    Location:
    Michigan
    Good answer... Epiphones respond really well to upgrades IMHO...
    but some are more necessary than others. New strings are usually
    included in a pro setup job. I don't think you can go wrong taking
    your new guitar in to get set up by the best luthier you can find or
    afford. Epiphones usually respond really well to pro setup too.
    Epi 0917@100.jpg
    I usually do this soon after buying any new or used guitar. I'll play it
    for a while just to take its measure... and I might try my own efforts
    at setting it up. But sooner or later it's in to the Luthier it goes.

    After a pro setup job, I can usually keep my guitars in fighting trim
    using my own skills and tools, and using Biddlin's method above.
    The Luthier has tools and measuring devices that I don't, so I rely
    on him to make sure my frets are level, the ends don't protrude, and
    the nut slots are correct. After that, I can play it for a good long time
    before it might need pro work again.

    Good luck, and welcome. Don't forget our other motto:

    PICTURES, OR IT
    NEVER HAPPENED
     

Share This Page


Recommended Links: PAF Pickups, Luthier Forum