Well, there goes the neighborhood. Modular guitar transformar guitar

Discussion in 'Other Guitars' started by sazista, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. sazista

    sazista Active Member

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  2. DaveInSoCal

    DaveInSoCal Active Member

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    I'll pass on that thanks.
     
    arcticsg likes this.
  3. arcticsg

    arcticsg Well-Known Member

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    Oh hell no..

    I'm good with my affliction of Guitar Acquisition Syndrome... (better known as GAS) :D
     
  4. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Active Member

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    I like the concept of it, though to be honest, Dan Armstrong did it some 40 years ago with an acrylic guitar and pop in pickups. The bridge looks...… interesting to say the least. The built in stand however..... oh god no.
     
  5. Tony M

    Tony M Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019
    Biddlin likes this.
  6. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

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    The New 3D Printed Guitar ...

    Thank for sharing, interesting but not for me .
     
  7. Satellitedog

    Satellitedog Active Member

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    I like the concept more than the design. Millimetric Instruments is a lot more to my liking.
     
  8. sazista

    sazista Active Member

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    What kind of experience did you have with Richlite fingerboards? Never played one, I think.
     
  9. Sweetums

    Sweetums Active Member

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    Not being snarky, I am genuinely curious about how the Boaz's plastic fretboard will look after a few years of use. Will owners treasure a scratched fretboard like well-worn maple or consider it flawed?

    Regardless of how one may feel about the design of the guitar, the number of donors and the amount of $$$ they've raised through Kickstarter is impressive!
     
  10. HackeIommi

    HackeIommi Active Member

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    I see nothing wrong with this guitar. Actually, a thinkable option for the stage.

    And I think we have to get to used this kind of guitars. Not just modular guitars, guitars made by different materials too. How many times woods will be used for any kind of industries, do we know or is there a guarantee? What if we face a permanent wood usage ban? Maybe the days we can't find even a basswood body and poplar neck SGs are closer than we think. Who knows?

    Do I have proof, a solid reason or a document? No. Just a feeling never leave me alone since CITES regulations. Yes, I love my guitars made by mahogany, alder, maple, rosewood, and ebony. But what if we have to abandon this kind of materials for the future of our planet? I feel ready for this kind of option.
     
  11. PeterS

    PeterS New Member

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    From an engineering point of view this is a very interesting concept. Wood is a natural, and kind of limited material, whereas plastic is infinite, stable and not as prone to environmental condition changes. Make the pickups easily swappable in the modules and there is an almost endless number of combinations.

    The guitar lover in me says it will never feel like my SG....
     
    HackeIommi and PixMix like this.
  12. PixMix

    PixMix Well-Known Member

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    Not my cup of tea, but a very cool concept. I think it would make for a great travel guitar, but also more than just that. I'd rather see this sort of innovation rather than more variations of old concepts with "clever" features designed to avoid trademark infringement. Like, how many "boutique" tele builders are out there?
     
  13. Tony M

    Tony M Well-Known Member

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    692,857 at last count.
     
  14. realcooldude

    realcooldude Member

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    It's not something I'd probably buy, but I think it's cool that it exists. Surely it's going to be expensive once production starts up for real.
     
  15. Worblehat

    Worblehat Well-Known Member

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    How is wood limited? It literally grows on trees. Very sustainable and infinitely renewable (if done right).
     
  16. realcooldude

    realcooldude Member

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    Yeah, most plastics are petroleum based and not exactly sustainable.
     
  17. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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  18. Chubbles

    Chubbles Well-Known Member

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    In 30 years, this could become vintage. Everyone will be dying to spend 10,000 one..

    and I still won't have one. Pet peeve: When parts become proprietary, they get expensive.
     
  19. sazista

    sazista Active Member

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  20. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Wood is limited by politics and geography, and by human greed
    and criminality. If you don't believe me, just watch the news and
    see photos and videos of Brazil burning down rain forests to clear
    the land for profit making ranchos. You can watch this video:


    Also, watch the follow-up videos Bob Taylor made in later years, discussing
    what he is doing to help. It is fascinating.

    Where you live and where I live, trees are plenty, and they grow well,
    and with wise harvesting, they are a sustainable resource, useable for
    musical instruments of many kinds. If guitar makers have any brains,
    and many of them do, they will turn to sustainable forests for the wood
    they make guitars from.

    Why not make guitars from Ash, and Maple, Walnut and Cherry,
    Poplar and Birch, Pine, Cedar, Fir and Spruce... I want to know.
    Traditionalists will
    object, and say, "oh no, it must be Mahogany and Rosewood,"
    but this simply is not true. Ask the ghost of Leo Fender...

    It is only tradition, based on the criminal and exploitive practices
    of our "civilization..." And it cannot continue.

    Instruments made of sustainable North Country hardwoods
    should be able to compete well with traditional instruments made of scarce
    (read that "expensive") tropical tone wood, and they will compete well
    with new innovations made of synthetics.

    What will our younger colleagues buy? I have believed for a long time
    that musicians of the future will make great music on instruments that
    have not been invented yet. Or maybe they have been invented, and
    they have their own Internet forum, and we are too stodgy and bound
    by tradition to know about it. *laughs

    Synthetic guitar materials will only make our present instruments more valuable. If you listen to Bob Taylor, and understand that the realities
    of tropical tone wood will dictate production and market, then you
    know that older guitars made from ebony and rosewood will likely
    become more desirable and rise in value
    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2019

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