What are you working on now ?

Discussion in 'Lessons & Techniques' started by DrBGood, May 23, 2019.

  1. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    Well think of what the old bluesmen had to play with... The cheapest thing available or whatvee they could slap together on a farm. I hate seeing acoustics go unused. The wY i think of it, its like acoustics are a healthy dieat and electric is junk food in the sense that playing acoustic in my opinion is far more productive and beneficial to me learning. Electric guitar should and always will be much easier than acoustic guitar to create palatble music.

    It might bug some people but its my opinion that if you dont ever play an acoustic you are missing out on a crititcal part of being a guitar player or a musician that utilizes guitar, however you want to put it. I knew a highly skilled metal guitarist who went at light speed all the time but when i made him play his acoustic for me it was embarrassing.

    P.S. people love blues slide guitar, it catches almost everyone's attention whereever i play. I cant tell if its becuase it sounds so good or if they are wondering how I'm playig with a tube on my finger. Then again its not often theres a blues guitarist around, litterally every other local band is punk or metal based. What happened to all the blues and jazz bands???
     
  2. Worblehat

    Worblehat Well-Known Member

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    I agree that playing acoustic besides electric is very beneficial for a lot of skills. It certainly expands your abilities with both instruments. On the other hand its totally fine if people exclusively play electric guitar and focus on a single genre like metal if that's what they want to do. Not everyone needs to be an all-round guitarist.

    I wanted to play the electric guitar for as long as I can remember. When I finally got a guitar as as a present from my parents it was an acoustic guitar. I started to learn it
    for 2 or 3 month and then stopped. It was not inspiring or motivating to me at all. I mostly listened to metal and wanted to play guitar because of that heavy electric sound!
    Years gone by until I decided to pickup a guitar again and buy an electric which was maybe the best decision I've ever made. Strumming a few distorted power chords was like heaven to me...all I ever wanted. And I've been practicing almost every day since then (2 years and something).

    Interestingly enough in those two years my musical taste has expanded. I listen to a lot of hard rock and blues rock these days and I am doing online courses on blues rhythm and blues slide guitar right now. And because of this I even consider to pick up that old acoustic again. it's all about what kind of music inspires you...
     
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  3. Layne Matz

    Layne Matz Well-Known Member

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    True, but if someone is very dedicated to guitar i think that sooner or later they should take some time to practice on one. I camt understand not wanting to expand ones musical playing horizons. That being said I'm not a fan of almost any metal, and my playing is almost entirely blues based with lots of other influences (primarily jazz, folk and early country as well as early rock and roll) that I'm working into my sound and techniques over time. I jsut cant really empathize with being comfortably locked into one format and not desiring expansion but i can see that for many guitarists there is no need or will to really delve into everything that might interest them and learn from it. Depends on how you learn as well.

    I like to think back to the early bluesmen, many of whom could not read or write yet learned to play so remarkably well that its changing lives to this day- I'm living proof it changes lives. That being said, they didn't take courses or traditional lessons. None of us really need them either if we set our minds to it, thats not to mention the wealth of resources we have access to that they could never even dream of.
     
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  4. flatrockmobile

    flatrockmobile Well-Known Member

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    Been working on some Clapton from the John Mayall with EC "Beano" album.
    I've got "Steppin Out" down and just started on his version of "Hideaway". At 62yrs old, it's about time!


     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2019
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  5. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Active Member

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    What am I working on right now? You'll probably think I am as nutty as a fruitcake. A friend calls me the "mechanic of melody" because I love melody and love to learn melodies from other instruments on my guitar. A while back I took an interest in an instrument that has a rather unique technique. I've been working on translating the technique and feel of the instrument onto guitar. What is the instrument? Way back when Celtic music was popular I saw the dance/musical Riverdance. There's a beautiful instrumental in the middle of that called "Caoineadh Cu Chulainn" or "the Lament of the hound of Chulainn."* It is played on the uillean pipes, a development of the bagpipe that uses a bellows to feed the bag and a two-octave chanter with sharps and flats. Here it is:



    Obviously, the technique of the instrument uses bent notes and rhythmic tremolo but the instrument is not capable of vibrato. I'm having to translate the tremolo into vibrato fro the sake of the guitar. But even from there, think about what the technique involves: bending, pre-bending, pull-on from the note above, push-on from the note below, sag off at the end of a note, interesting triplets including triplets containing a dotted note(!), etc. It's quite a handful! Wow, how that pushes your own technique! I started working on the technique by applying it to a song already in my repertoire, an instrumental version of "Women of Ireland" and when I became comfortable with some of it, I said to myself, "What the heck! Why don't I take on "Caoineadh Cu Chulainn" itself?"

    And so I've started.

    Bob

    * "Caoineadh" above can translated "Keening," which is a favorite description of the sound of the bagpipes. Want me to try to pronounce the name of the tune? Depending upon the dialect it renders "Queen'-eh Coo-Hullen' " with the "H" pronounced as a hard H originating in the throat.
     
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