where to go after the pentatonic scale ? Aeolian

Discussion in 'Lessons & Techniques' started by fahad187, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. Gillean

    Gillean Well-Known Member

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    If you dont want nothing major, I would definetly tell you to go practice the Dorian mode. It is the easiest way to MONSTERLY improve your blues improvisation skills.
    After that I would recommend mixolidian, which would make you go to the next level on blues improvisiation, but it has a major flavor to it.

    Now, if what you want is get better at everything regarding solos construction and improvisation in western music I would recomend:

    1- minor penta
    2- Major penta
    3- Major scale
    4- 7 Dominant arpejios
    5- 7maj arpejios
    6- 7 minor arpejios
    7- Modes (in this order: Dorian, eolian, mixolidian, ,lidian, phrigian, locrian[this one is pretty useless, for the most part])

    It is a damn tough road to learn all this, but in the end. oh boy, you will be free from your chains.
     
  2. Relic61

    Relic61 Well-Known Member

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    And practice those scales until they flow off your fingertips effortlessly.

    All the time spent practicing this is developing both muscle memory & an ear for what each modality sounds like. The more effortless it becomes with practice the more the music will be flowing through your being, out your fingers, through your amplifier, to your ears & back to your being! The next steps is letting that connection flow through you so you are no longer playing scales but able to give voice to what you hear & feel coming from inside you & having it flow forth with the same ease as putting together a thoughtful sentence. That is when you are plugged in or in 'the Zone'.

    I've read a couple different interviews with Carlos Santana where he talks about playing guitar & he sort of touches on all that but really gets deep. Some that don't get it could easily laugh at him talking like a Hippy that did too many experimental drugs but I totally related to his break down of what happens when he plays guitar. The music is out there if we open up, listen to it & are able to channel it through our instruments. If we hear it in our head, feel it in our soul & deliver it through our playing we are plugged into the magic & will be making beautiful music capable of power & emotion that others can feel & experience. Ala, the beauty & wonder of music.

    Learning our scales is but a necessary step to being able to let all that happen.
     
  3. ptrnyc

    ptrnyc Member

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    I can't comment on the technical side of this on the guitar as I'm a beginner with 6 strings, but on the piano, the next step is to practice chords arpeggios going up, and bebop scale going down. There are countless solos, and not only in jazz styles, based off this concept.

    Also, a big breakthrough is when you realize that the really important notes are the ones you start and end your phrases with. Everything in between is acceptable, it's just "tense" or "not so tense". This really frees you from all the theory, chord/scale relationships, and other stuff you can spend a lifetime studying.
     
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  4. Relic61

    Relic61 Well-Known Member

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    Good stuff PTR!

    As my childhood friends older brother used to tell me,.. "Keep Practicing Man!" LOL Yaaa thanks Eugene..

    But, there is so much to be said about that simple statement. It is inevitable that the more time you spend on your instrument, plus the more you open your mind up learning & the more your hand / thought coordination develop, the sooner it all begins to make musical sense & the better we get.
    There even eventually will come a time that with enough practicing & educating that playing can become one fluid process from thought to execution & may even contain & convey emotion & tangible energy. Once these things start to happen it can almost seem like a switch was thrown or a turn was made & the whole process suddenly seems to accelerate in leaps & bounds! Those really can be the best if we stick with it long enough & apply ourselves while continuing to dedicate enough time everyday for this to happen.

    In the meantime, like Eugene said to me all those years ago, "Keep Practicing Man!"
    Best advice ever! Thanx Euge!
     
  5. 67plexi

    67plexi Well-Known Member

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    Learn all the scales then practice two hours on them every day before you play any songs.
    Then go forward reverse inverted. As an example a triad 1/4/5 5/4/1 4/1/5 and so on.
    I thought I had a concept on it could play an A scale in 17 positions on the guitar neck
    Rick Derringer showed me 28 positions in A. I said what do I know I'm a drummer.
    Rick my drummer is sick could you fill in one practice then played the show.
    Rick asked what I wanted after the show a guitar lesson I thought my brain was going to explode what they play on stage is elementary
    to what is played in private. One more point get out of your comfort zone. I never play the same solo twice with the forward reverse inverted
    I just gave you the key's to the kingdom. Throw a clam out there every now and then your only a half step off.
     
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  6. Stubacca

    Stubacca New Member

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    Try combining the relative major to the minor pentatonic. I found this lesson really helpful.
     

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