Your SG in action

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Dave_Death, May 10, 2015.

  1. Dave_Death

    Dave_Death Well-Known Member

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    I think he's added the Bigsby but the controls and pickguard look stock
     
  2. John Vasco

    John Vasco Active Member

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    Embossed pickup covers would point to a '72...
     
  3. Bunkman

    Bunkman New Member

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    I have a guitar like this one above. I guess it's an SG Deluxe
    It has the Les Paul style pick guard and the guard under the knobs is the same. The serial number puts it in the mid seventies. I have read a lot of negatives about this but it's been with me since the late seventies and I love it in spite of it's imperfections. I've never been able to keep it in tune. It has a small crack in the body near the neck where the pickup is and the neck is canted forward but is straight otherwise. It seems to have an overly flexible neck because the slightest pressure changes the pitch. It clearly needs some work. Any advice on where to start. I considered going straight to Gibson for repairs because I have no experience in guitar repair and who can work on it without possibly doing something wrong.

    Also what is Nolin? Is that a factory that Gibson used?
     
  4. Bunkman

    Bunkman New Member

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    A second question. What would the correct neck angle be for this 1970s Norlin SG Deluxe?
     
  5. Bunkman

    Bunkman New Member

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    Not a great photo but you can see the neck tilts forward. The action is ok however so I wonder if the neck angle is by design or did my Brother-in-Law make the action fit the tilted neck angle when he took it under his wing 20 years ago?

    neck angle.jpg

    You can see the crack in the body near where the neck joins and pickup is installed. What a skinny body!
    Crack.jpg

    It came with this truss rod plate when I bought it in 1979 from a guy in Orono Maine. Was this an attempt to trick someone or did some go out like this from the factory? I read somewhere that Les Paul did not like the SG body and insisted his name not be used on these.
    WTF.jpg
    Here's a full length photo head on with as little lens skew as I could get.
    Full lngth.jpg
     
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  6. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Well that clearly isn't right. The action is way high and the bridge is bottomed out - there is no way to lower it. It is hard to tell, but as well is being tilted upwards, is the neck also curved up?
     
  7. Bunkman

    Bunkman New Member

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    There is a slight curve in the neck but not enough to account for the forward tilt. Lets see if these photos help.
    starightedge.jpg
    bend.jpg
     
  8. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, not too much of a curve. I'm afraid I know nothing about Norlin SGs - never even held one.
     
  9. Bunkman

    Bunkman New Member

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    I was happy to see this. Maybe not a Norlin Gibson if this is correct.
    Another odd thing about this neck and head. It appears to be made form three parallel pieces.

    Guitar Project.JPG
     
  10. Paul G.

    Paul G. Well-Known Member

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    Last night.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Three parallel pieces in the head is not unusual - the "ears" for the tuners are often glued onto a neck-width blank. I can't say I've ever seen parallel pieces within the neck itself though. Anyone?
     
  12. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    My 74 had a 3 piece neck (5 if you count the headstock wings).
    Not unusual in the Norlin years.
     
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  13. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I have a couple of Martin acoustics, and they both have approximately 30 piece necks. And they are probably the best, most stable necks of any of my guitars.
     
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  14. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    My friend has one of those . Really nice guitar !

    The guitars I've been building have 3 piece necks. I like the stability, look and mostly the cost effectiveness of these necks.
     
  15. RVA

    RVA Well-Known Member

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    30?! That is a lot of pieces. Was that the jigsaw puzzle series?
     
  16. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    Actually they are a very nice low cost option Martin. The neck is a bunch of 1/16th" approx. pieces of wood laminated into a billet and shaped into a neck. SUPER STABLE neck.
     
  17. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    And they look cool too!
     
  18. RVA

    RVA Well-Known Member

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    That is very cool. I must Google it now!
     
  19. Bunkman

    Bunkman New Member

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    Yes. Upon closer inspection my SG has the 5 pieces counting the headstock wings. I've heard it said that lamination can be advantageous in guitar bodies and I suppose the same could be true of necks. Any ideas on the neck angle in this odd series of SG's? 1970 1971 or 1972. This definitely leans forward but is not drastically curved. Just seems to be set that way, is fairly straight but changes pitch with any slight pressure on the neck.
     
  20. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

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    To me, from your pictures , the neck looks to be curved up. I had a 72 SG III , so it was the same guys building my guitar as yours .
    My neck was skinny but it was dead flat . No 3 or 4 degree angle like on the original SG or modern ones. My 74 was a very shallow neck joint angle of about 2 degrees but it was a 74 not an earlier one . The 72 and 73 models barely had any neck angle - they were more like a "Gibson Telecaster".
    Nice guitar by the way !

    The neck looks like it needs some love from a luthier , but if the old girl works and you enjoy playing it YAY! I bet she sounds mean!
    I miss my 72 with mini humbuckers . ..sigh...
     

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