YouTube question

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by TheSandman, Mar 29, 2020.

  1. TheSandman

    TheSandman Active Member

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    Is it a form of online piracy, to watch YouTube videos, from people that’s uploaded music from the artist, without authorized permission?

    Same for TV shows or movies, without permission from the TV company or movie company?
     
  2. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Plenty of them are pulled by Youtube at the request of the original artists. There is a fair use clause to cover reactions and reviews, but that normally falls well short of playing the entire video without pauses.
     
  3. TheSandman

    TheSandman Active Member

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    That’s what I have wondered. I figured it was. I’ve noticed a bunch of channels that has TV or movie clips from 10 years or longer that’s still on the site. Same with songs from albums. Some have the whole album uploaded. I’m surprised they haven’t gotten in trouble. I’ve been telling my friend that it’s wrong, to watch videos that someone uploads of artists or tv clips or movie scenes without permission, but he doesn’t think it is.
     
  4. TheSandman

    TheSandman Active Member

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    That’s basically condoning online piracy. Same as if someone gives you money to buy a car, and you knew it was illegal money, but you didn’t do the illegal activity, to get the money.
     
  5. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but plenty of smaller acts regard it as free marketing. It really is more complicated than straight theft. Even some UK TV channels like Channel 4 have a Youtube channel where non-UK people can wath their programmes. I know they have made several syndication deals on the strength of demand from Youtube audeinces.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/channel4
     
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  6. Piper68Special

    Piper68Special Active Member

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    Some companies like CD Baby upload artists' music to YouTube to add to revenue streams.
     
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  7. njpaulc

    njpaulc Active Member

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    It depends. I use youtube to preview albums, if I want to listen to it more than once, I buy it. If the album is out of print, I have no problem, listening to it repeatedly. The grateful Dead long allowed tradingof audience recordings, with the understanding, if it ever became an official release it was no lomger tradeable. Then they started doing limited releases, took shows out of circulation, and did not reissue, or make downloads available when the shows sold out. I have qualms about listening to those shows on youtube over and over, although most of them aren't worth it.

    If the only way a TV show is available is on youtube, I have no problems. There's a lot of old shows that I've missed, that aren't for sale.

    How different is watching on youtube from buying second hand?
     
  8. TheSandman

    TheSandman Active Member

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    I guess the ones I’m referring to, are the ones that you don’t have to pay to watch. The ones where everyday people upload it from their computer without authorized permission, as opposed to a company having the rights, or the company’s YouTube account uploading it.
     
  9. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Very different. A physical recording like a CD is licensed at the point of sale. After that it is the property of whoever bought it, and they are free to pass that title on as they choose. Even if someone else now owns it, there is still only that one copy out there and it is already licensed. With software, when the new copy is created, the old one still remains, and there should now be two licenses. So the artists is denied the fee for one of them.

    But most artists are wise to the fact that it is unlikely that many of the new listeners would have paid for a copy, so the best they can do is trust that the increased listenership will pay dividends in the future, either through monetized Youtube plays or even physical purchase.
     
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  10. TheSandman

    TheSandman Active Member

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    Pretty much summed it up right there. Question though, what if the video that a user uploads isn’t monetized?
     
  11. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    It's up to the artist to stay on top of that. If he makes a valid copyright claim to Youtube the video will be taken down.
     
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  12. TheSandman

    TheSandman Active Member

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    I’ve wondered how some tv clips, or movie clips, that have been uploaded by users, are still on there years and years later. It looks like the film company would’ve seen it by now.
     
  13. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Presumably they weren't bothered. TV programmes are slightly different to music in that they are not generally for sale in the market.
     
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  14. TheSandman

    TheSandman Active Member

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    I’ve seen a lot of tv programs for sale, at stores and online like Amazon for example. Assuming those are the ones that would be bothered?
     
  15. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I would imagine so.
     

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