1967 Gibson SG Modifications?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by tenwatt, Jul 30, 2008.

  1. tenwatt

    tenwatt New Member

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    Hey guys,

    I've got a '67 SG that is in GREAT condition but I'm wanting more out of it. I'm wanting to make some changes and wanting to hear others input on how this would affect the guitars value and such.

    It currently has a tremolo bridge, P-90 soapbar pick-ups, and open back tuners. I want to add a fixed bride, some humbuckers, and some nicer Gibson tuners.

    Thoughts, suggestions, and comments are VERY welcomed!
     
  2. bradsure

    bradsure Active Member

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    I got a suggestion. Sell it to me! :) Got pics?
     
  3. tenwatt

    tenwatt New Member

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    I'll post some pics tonight. ;D
     
  4. Rooney

    Rooney Member

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    Sounds like you want to make a Special into a Standard. I take it you're not a big Who fan?
     
  5. tenwatt

    tenwatt New Member

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    I dig The Who quite a bit. I just don't like the tremolo bridge and the open back tuners mostly.

    Any thoughts on how these mods would change the value of the guitar?
     
  6. angus

    angus Active Member

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    well, in any case of modding an SG of yours' age, it will take down to resale value quite a bit.

    your best chances for trading or selling it (if it would be your plan) would be to just leave it alone and keep it in the best condition you can.



    if its in decent condition, i wouldnt take any chances.
     
  7. JWest

    JWest Member

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    I say just buy a re-issue and call it a day.
    The way I look at it is like this. Say you have a classic guitar thats worth 10k and you mod it to your liking, but it lowers the value of it by 2500. Why not just save up 2500 and buy a re-issue and keep the classic the way it's meant to be? That way in the end your classic is still a classic, you didnt lose any money or value on your classic and you've got another guitar the way you want it to be.
    In my opinion classic guitars are not for modding. They arn't making anymore 67 sg's and they arn't getting any cheaper.
     
  8. tenwatt

    tenwatt New Member

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  9. angus

    angus Active Member

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  10. guitarweasel

    guitarweasel Well-Known Member

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  11. SG John

    SG John Well-Known Member

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    For what it's worth, here's my two cents.

    If the tremolo isn't doing anything for you, remove it and put it in a safe place. The compensated bridge/tailpice is fine, and will transfer energy from the strings to the body better than any other setup. If it's difficult to intonate, replace it with a Pigtail, TonePros, or Leo Quann bridge. It will use the same style stud. Again save the original, and keep in a a safe place. After you do this you may find that you like the pickups better, because of the way the strings vibrate. I have a '62 SG/Les Paul Special with the stock tailpiece, and a '69 SG Junior with a Leo Quann. I love the way those guitars (mis)behave.

    If you want to do anything about the pickups, I'd first swap out the ceramic capacitors, or the perhaps the caps and pots. If doing both, remove them all attached, and just carfulley unsolder the pickups. Fasten them to a piece of stiff cardboard marking which position the were each at, just in case you want to return it to original. RS Guitarworks makes great replacement kits with quality pots and paper/oil caps. If you're still unhappy with them, replace the pickups with p-100 stacked humbuckers so you won't have to butcher the body. Be careful though, '67 to '70 SG Special pickups have a different style backing plate that mounts to the pickguard. Don't drill the body fitting others!

    But really, you shouldn't mess with it. Get another SG (w/ buckers), and keep that one as a spare. You may find later that you really like the personality of that guitar the way it is. Unmolested SGs are getting harder to find. You have a nice keeper. Once you start replacing the electronics and changing the body, you can't go back.
     
  12. mcd

    mcd Member

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    Man, don't do anything to it. You will regret it. If you want a humbucker guitar so badly, why don't you just sell this one and use the money to buy a 61 reissue?

    That guitar is great BECAUSE it is original. The minute you touch it it becomes just another hacked old guitar.

    Gibson released the SG Classic because people wanted P90 SG's like yours. Sell it and let someone that loves them be happy instead of destroying a piece of guitar history.

    Better yet, plug that thing into a Marshall and spend a little time with it. Your may be surprised what you find hidden within it.
     
  13. tenwatt

    tenwatt New Member

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    Alright, I'm studying up on this axe more and more and I'm confused about something. Can someone tell me if this is "ink stamped" or "impressed"?

    www.louisvillediscgolf.com/images/img_2049.jpg

    The reason I ask is because I punched it into the serial number tracker think as impressed and it calls it a 1967. I punched it in as ink stamped and it calls it a 1960. They didn't make the SG in 60 did they? The number on the pots is 137662. The serial number is 006XXX. Help!
     
  14. mcd

    mcd Member

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    It's a 67. Legendary.


    Play it.
     
  15. tenwatt

    tenwatt New Member

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    Thanx for all the info guys! I’ll most likely keep it the way it is. I have to share with you all the way I came about this guitar. I was laying on a creeper underneath a car at my Dad’s garage about 10 years ago listening to “Tradio”. Tradio is a radio show where people call into the radio station and are allowed to announce over the air items that they have for sale. They then spout out there phone number and you call if you’re interested. Usually it’s old washing machines or televisions so as a sixteen year old kid I wasn’t really that interested.

    Then I heard some older sounding guy say “I’ve got an old Gibson guitar that I want $100 for.”

    I rocketed across the floor on the creeper and then jumped up and ran to the phone and wait for the guy to recite his phone number.

    I called him and asked “What kind of Gibson do you have?”

    He said “I didn’t know Gibson made any thing but Gibson.”

    I then got directions to his place and told him to take his phone off the hook.

    When I got to his house he was sitting out in his garage with guitar in a stand and some old Gibson banjos and some misc. amps and such. He pointed out the SG to me and after examining it I explained to him “I don’t know what year this guitar is but to be completely honest with you I would be ripping you off to only give you $100 dollars for it.”

    He said “I only gave $100 for it and that amplifier 17 years ago and I’m not looking to make any money.” As he said this he pointed to a 60’s model Silvertone 1482 tube amp.

    He said if I gave him $100 they would both be mine. I pulled a one hundred dollar bill out of my pocket and walked away a happy sixteen year old boy. I sold the amp about a week later for $600 and have been offered up to $3000 multiple times for the guitar but it’s hard to get ready of something so awesome that has such a great story.
     
  16. angus

    angus Active Member

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    wow.... lucky sob ;)
     
  17. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    Nice Score. A great story always makes the guitar a little more valuable to the owner.
     

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