2014 SGJ needs new tuners. Mods?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Bossidar Rivas, Jul 26, 2020.

  1. Bossidar Rivas

    Bossidar Rivas New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Got my 2014 SGJ as a birthday gift to myself, first Gibson , its a great guitar even with the dings the last owner put in her.
    But even after a setup she goes out of tune alot. Predictably the G but the E aswell. Whats the size foe the tuners or the best tuners to get as a replacment. A friend suggested Grovers. I just wanna be sure of the peg hole and size of the tuners. but the only vintage style set they have isnt much of a ratio improvement.what has the best ratio but still the vintage style and look. Or should I just get the Grover 502C locking tuners for its stability and not worry about the look? First post since joining any help is appreciated thanks.
     
  2. cheshiergrin

    cheshiergrin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2018
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    297
    I would check the nut slots first, maybe even a bit of graphite would solve the problem. Good luck.
     
  3. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2018
    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    450
    Why not take a few moments and look at the nut? 90% of the time when someone says the tuners are screwed up, I find it's the nut. A few seconds with a nut file, or hell, even a pencil, can save you the 60 ucks or so for tuners.
     
    Chubbles and Bossidar Rivas like this.
  4. Bossidar Rivas

    Bossidar Rivas New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the help guys. Ive heard the nuts on these lower models can come loose so that did cross my mind.Any ideas on replacments if its not the nut?
     
  5. cheshiergrin

    cheshiergrin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2018
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    297
    first take a pencil, carpenters pencil works best, and scrape some of the graphite into the nut slots put the string back in and see if it fixes the problem, I would bet it does, just try it. :D
     
    Bossidar Rivas likes this.
  6. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2012
    Messages:
    12,012
    Likes Received:
    10,101
    Location:
    -
    Welcome to the forum!
    [​IMG]
    First loosen the strings enough to move them aside while you take a sharp number 2 pencil and put some graphite in the nut slots.
    I have never had a Gibson nut come loose, in 50 years of playing them. In the unlikely event lubrication doesn't solve the problem you may need to widen the nut slots with a file or abrasive wire. The tuners are almost never the problem. I usually replace tuners with OEM, in your case Kluson deluxe tuners.
    [​IMG]
    My next recommendation would be Kluson G mount locking tuners.
    [​IMG]
    Good luck.
     
  7. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2018
    Messages:
    1,678
    Likes Received:
    1,531
    Welcome here,
    The KLUSON Revolution are fantastic.

    SG Standard TBK 188.jpg
     
    Bossidar Rivas likes this.
  8. JesseXGibson

    JesseXGibson Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2020
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    45
    Big bends nut sauce works really well too. I use it Every 2-3 month on each guitar and I never have tuning problems.

    Again though if lubrication doesn’t solve your problem, +1
    to this:

     
    Chubbles and Bossidar Rivas like this.
  9. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,753
    Likes Received:
    4,095
    Location:
    London, new hearing aid project - exciting
    I disagree. In my experience it is the nut 100% of the time. I've never seen a slipping tuner. Lubing the nut is great, but it is only stopgap to the real solution, which is getting the slots filed properly so they don't pinch.
     
  10. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2016
    Messages:
    1,132
    Likes Received:
    1,062
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    I agree completely. Take it to a tech and get the nut done properly.
     
    DrBGood and Bossidar Rivas like this.
  11. Bossidar Rivas

    Bossidar Rivas New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for that thorough answer. I'll try the pencil trick and take it from there.hopefully i dont have to change the tuners. But if i do those kluson locking tuners would be perfect if the nut isnt the issue.
     
  12. Bossidar Rivas

    Bossidar Rivas New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'll try tge pencil trick as shown above .I'm not the handiest guy so i might just take it in to have it looked at.
     
  13. Chubbles

    Chubbles Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Messages:
    671
    Likes Received:
    406
    Yeah, what they said. The nut may be the problem. If it is, a tuner swap won't help.
     
    Bossidar Rivas likes this.
  14. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    3,737
    Likes Received:
    4,628
    Causes of tuning problems:

    1. Broken tuner
    2. Nut slot pinching string
    3. Old strings

    Unless the tuners are actually broken, no need to replace. Locking tuners are only for the purpose of quick string changes, not to lock the gears from any backlash or slipping. If you tune a string too high, tune below target pitch, then back up to pitch so that the string windings on the tuning posts load properly.

    Check the nut slots. As others have stated, make certain the nut slots are cut properly for the size strings that you are using so that the slots are not pinching said strings.

    Old strings can become fatigued over time and not hold pitch or affect intonation. Replace with new set when doing a setup.

    Finally, I prefer to wind the strings on all my guitars using the string self-lock method pictured below to keep strings from slipping on the tuning posts.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2020
  15. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2015
    Messages:
    7,764
    Likes Received:
    7,320
    Location:
    Sutton Québec
    You can also widen the slots a tad. Use a bigger gauge string to do that. Like run the E string through the A slot and so on.

    Like said before, even on cheap ass guitars, tuners are mostly never the problem. I wouldn't imagine it would be on a Gibson. But internet is good at making you think you need to replace perfectly good parts on everything you own, from guitar to car.

    Here's the self-locking string thing.

     
  16. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    3,208
    Likes Received:
    3,086
    Location:
    Kelowna B.C.
    I use a wwlding tip cleaner for working on nut slots. Cheap and they have all the sizes you need for a regular guitar.
    [​IMG]

    They're like 5 bucks or so.
     
    plankton, Bossidar Rivas and DrBGood like this.
  17. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2015
    Messages:
    7,764
    Likes Received:
    7,320
    Location:
    Sutton Québec
    Yeah, forgot about those. I have a set somewhere.
     
  18. shreddy bender

    shreddy bender Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    3,208
    Likes Received:
    3,086
    Location:
    Kelowna B.C.
    I also use a set at work for cleaning clogged paint guns. Handy little tool.
     
  19. Chubbles

    Chubbles Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Messages:
    671
    Likes Received:
    406
    Lowes has the welding tip cleaners for 3.xx. I'm buying it tomorrow.
     
  20. cheshiergrin

    cheshiergrin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2018
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    297
    +1 on the welding tip cleaners, not the right tool for some things but to just open a nut slot they are perfect.
     

Share This Page