61 Reissue Bridge Saddle

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Slssh75, Jan 14, 2021.

  1. Slssh75

    Slssh75 New Member

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    I just picked up a SG 61 reissue. After only 2 days I broke the high E string. When the string broke the saddle fell out that the sting sits on. Is that normal or should it not just fall out like that? Basically it is just sitting on top of the bridge.
     
  2. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Active Member

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    Can you post a photo? My gut is telling me something is wrong here, as nothing should fall out if a string breaks. A picture might give more information to help figure out what isn't right on your bridge.
     
  3. Slssh75

    Slssh75 New Member

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    Sure. Here are a couple of photos. Should it just fall out like that? Thanks
     

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  4. Neezduts89

    Neezduts89 Member

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    They can be removed since they’re basically just threaded in with a screw. Was the screw backed out too far initially? I’ve never seen one just fall out like that though
     
  5. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Active Member

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    OK, it does appear that there is nothing beyond string tension to hold the entire screw/saddle sub assembly in the bridge bar itself, and that appears to be by design. It is odd, but looks to be how it was made. You should be able to just drop the screw and saddle back into the notch and re-string it to be back in business. It is strange to me, but I don't see anything that looks "broken" as such.

    I will say the open screw notches in the bridges bar is not the typical method I have seen used by Gibson. Is there a chance this is a replacement bridge? If you bought the instrument new it probably isn't, but who knows. I have certainly not seen "everything", but this one is a bit surprising as I have not seen an adjustable style bridge like this with no provision other than string pressure to retain the saddle and adjustment screws. It isn't a fatal flaw, just something to be aware of going forward. Most bridges are constructed differently and won't fall out like this, so if it bugs you, you can easily replace it with one of a different design without modification to the instrument itself.
     
  6. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Active Member

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    I just did a bit of looking and found this thread on another forum:

    https://forum.gibson.com/topic/141750-abr-1-vs-nashville-bridge-on-sg-61-reissue/

    It looks like a stock ABR-1 bridge. There does appear to be a retaining wire or spring that is missing on yours. Guess I learned something new today as well. There are some pictures in the thread above where you can see the wire near the adjusting screw heads. Should be an easy fix that can be done at your leisure.
     
  7. Slssh75

    Slssh75 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply about this! No it is not a replacement bridge and is stock. It is new and a 2020 model.
    This is my first SG after wanting one for many years and I really love it.
    I just didn't know if this was broken or was by design.
    Sounds like it is the latter. Going to restring it this weekend and see how it goes!
     
  8. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    No SG ‘61 Reissues were produced in 2020.
    They are called SG Standard ‘61.
    That's not the correct stock bridge for an SG Standard '61.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
  9. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Oringally ABR-1 bridges had no retaining wire and if you broke a string your saddle fell out. People complained because they didn't like crawling around on the floor looking for their saddles during a gig. So Gibson added a retaining wire in around '61. A lot of vintage enthusiasts have romanticized that no-wire bridge as having better tone (of course). No wire to vibrate goes the theory. There have been reproductions without the wire for that reason. You might have one of them.

    This is what an original looks like, I found one in a flea market once. You can see that there's no wire.

     
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  10. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Active Member

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    Chasing around on the floor of a dark crowded biker bar looking for a dropped saddle sounds like a miserable way to spend a couple futile hours that could be better spent trying to trim your toenails with a pair of ViseGrip pliers to me... :rofl:

    It looks like a Tune-o-Mattic bridge would slip right over the existing height adjustment posts, no modification of any kind needed. The way I use my guitars, I would definitely pull the ABR-1 off and replace it for playing purposes. Just stick the original in a box, and keep it with the guitar in case you want to switch back someday. The Tune-o-Matic looks and functions just the same for all intents and purposes, but the saddles won't drop out.

    If you just play at home or in the studio, the bridge you have should work just fine. Color me skeptical on the "tone advantage" of either bridge. I would be stunned and amazed if anyone could tell any difference at all in a blindfolded playing test.
     
  11. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Epiphone have this problem well beaten. They have a spring clip across all the screw heads, so they stay in place when you change a string.
     
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  12. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Active Member

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    Also a workable solution, any idea if it would be a simple thing to retrofit? I've never used an ABR-1 before, but it seems like it would be pretty easy to do.
     
  13. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Pictured below is my favorite type of bridge.
    No saddles, wire, etc to worry about.

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Active Member

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    That definitely qualifies as the "bombproof" option. I've never used one, but as long as the intonation is good at the start (no further adjustment needed) I can't think of a more solid setup. Maybe one day I will find one and give it a go.
     
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  15. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I have a Pigtail wraparound on my Melody Maker. Equally bombproof, but with adjustable intonation. And the saddles won't fall out. aaaaaa.jpg
     
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  16. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Here's a video by tone experminter Johan Segeborn where he tests an original 1950s no-wire bridge against a modern copy with the wire from a custom shop Les Paul (so supposed to be accurate repro but it has that wire so it's not). Now you can hear it and decide if you hear anything different.

     
  17. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Don't want to cry foul, but the 2012 was absolutely running at a lower volume setting. Changing a bridge does not do that.
     
  18. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Fair enough, I don't have an opinion because frankly my hearing isn't great and things that other people lose their minds over (like audiophiles talking about how terrible MP3s are) I just can't hear the subtle problems. Certainly I will never tell someone else that they are wrong when they assert something about tone being better if... whatever they like happens.
     
  19. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I deal with audio every day, and I promise - MP3s are just fine. In the early days they could be bad because limited Internet bandwidth forced over-compression. That doesn't happen any more. But this was a no-brainer. It was just softer - you could hear it purely in the volume and in the fact that it wasn't driving the amp anything like as hard.
     
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  20. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    I understand, I was just saying that in general those who swear that it makes a difference (not in the video, in general) may or may not be right, it's not mine to judge. I know that I sold my 1959 ABR-1 to a guy with a 1960 burst and he says it is phenomenal, huge difference. Confirmation bias? I don't know, maybe it makes a huge difference and maybe not but I can say this, he was willing to pay a lot of dough for it and he's very happy with the results so that's all that matters.

    Regarding MP3s, I am an electrical engineer who focussed on RF and digital signal processing back when CDs were a brand new thing. I understand the impact of signal to noise based on number of bits (it's a lot) and I accept that if there was a big difference between MP3 and, say, FLAC I wouldn't be able to hear it BUT based on the numbers I just don't think there is one that humans can hear unless your using 64 bit MP3s or something. But that's just me.
     

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