71’ SG Pro resto questions

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Led sled fred, Nov 19, 2020.

  1. Led sled fred

    Led sled fred New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2020
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi everone!, New guy here with questions about a 71 sg pro I am going to put back to stock (as close as possible) and refinish. It has a aftermarket bridge/saddle held on with les Paul like studs that I want to replace with a banjo bridge and Bigsby tremolo. I can find old banjo bridges or reproductions no problem. I am having a problem finding a b5 tremolo with the Gibson logo along the bottom. Would it hurt the value of the guitar if I put a new b5 on there with the Bigsby logo on the bottom or should I wait around until I find the correct Gibson embossed tremolo?
    If ok with using new Bigsby would I be alright using a roller type bridge or should I keep it as close to stock as possible?
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2018
    Messages:
    479
    Likes Received:
    387
    Quick answer, yes. It will hurt the value of the guitar. So will the replacement of the bridge, and the refinish.

    Long answer. If you are doing this with the intent to sell again, then get ALL original parts, and DO NOT refinish! A refinish, will knock off about 35%-40% of value off of the guitar. AND most times you'll lose the serial number in the process.
    If you are planning to keep it forever and ever, then do what you feel you need to make it playable and YOURS!
     
  3. Led sled fred

    Led sled fred New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2020
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the reply BP. The guitar had already been refinished without filling in the pores before I bought it back around 1983. Yeah, they almost sanded the serial numbers off of it too. Due to it being a guitar that was like a father son project for my Dad and myself, I do plan on keeping it. Just trying to plan ahead before I jump into it, thanks again!
     
  4. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2020
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    23
    One of the things I actually like about getting a previously modified or refinished guitar is that it is very difficult to further hurt it's value if you are careful and judicious about what you are doing. It also makes it possible to get a potentially really nice instrument without paying a collector premium for it.

    In cases such as you are describing, I usually spend a bit of time with the instrument evaluating what was already changed and deciding if something needs to be done about it, and if so what. Some things are obvious right away, and some things are less obvious and may require a few months of playing and getting it set up as good as possible with what already is there. Some modifications can actually help improve an instrument from a players standpoint, but hurt the value from a collector perspective. If that damage has already been done, you will probably do no further harm (which is always my motto in these circumstances).

    Project guitars can be very rewarding, and can allow you to get a really nice playing instrument for a relatively small investment and some "sweat equity". I wish I had taken some "before and after" pics of a couple of project guitars I took on. I would definitely recommend doing that if you haven't already done so. :smile:
     
    PermissionToLand likes this.
  5. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2013
    Messages:
    2,012
    Likes Received:
    1,700
    A '71 SG Pro is never going to be collectible anyway, so I don't think you need to worry about historical accuracy.
     

Share This Page