97 Sg special worn or scam?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Koison, Nov 21, 2020.

  1. jk67SG

    jk67SG Member

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    guitarinsite.nl:
    Serial number: 90237138
    Production year: 23 January 1997 (serial nr.: 138)
    (Manufactured Electric: Nashville or Memphis. Acoustic: Bozeman, Montana.)

    Note that part in parenthesis.

    My '67 SG Standard was dated correctly by guitarinsite even though records are notoriously sketchy/incomplete for this period. Even Gibson employees couldn't date it correctly until I told them where my serial was located in their own records. Numbers for some years were located in several different areas and out of order. Those records have since been replaced, so one more opportunity to screw them up. So why am I positive that the serial I got from guitarinsite.nl is correct? The headstock inlay, the wings, the shape of the pickguard, the tuners, the control cavity wiring, the bridge, the truss rod nut, the pot date codes, the date and serial on the card that came with the guitar when it was sold, and, oh yeah, the fact that I bought it in early '68.

    Not saying guitarinsite.nl is 100% correct, but every guitar that I've checked there was accurate (evidenced by original receipts, physical exams, records from dealer who sold them, etc).
     
  2. SMWRG

    SMWRG New Member

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    I'd like to give you an alternative suggestion. Why not consider one of the 2020 Epiphone SG 1961 guitars. I owned a genuine 2961 Les Paul Custom SG for 35 years and despite its issues was the best playing guitar I've ever touched. The very fragile neck was the slimmest and had the best access to the highest frets of the neck I've ever encountered. The heel enlarged over the years, the first years were the best playing, but fragile. I miss that guitar every day.

    Gibson has attempted reissues over the years but usually modifies the neck joint and heel. They started a '61 reissue line in 2019 and Epiphone released their version in 2020. The 2019 Gibsons neck joints are not exactly accurate and neither is the Epiphone, but are probably stronger than the original design without significantly changing the access to the very highest frets. Original SG designs have back side of the body beveled down toward the neck joint from just below the bottom of the horn cuts, making the wood just that much thinner at the heel of the neck joint.
    I've played both the Gibson and the Epiphone guitars and immediately decided the Epiphone was so close to the Gibson version that there was no way to justify the price difference, roughly $1,200. I'd suggest the stopbar versions of either of the SG Std. over either tremoloes, both look great but aren't very useful and cause tuning probkems. I ended up with the black Epiphone SG Custom, bkack with gold hardware and an ebony fretboard. I couldn't be happier. The build quality is fantastic and I couldn't see that much of a difference between that of Gibson vs Epiphone as far as playability, hardware, etc., other than the lack of a nitrocellulose finish on the Epiphone.

    Anyway, consider a new higher spec SG than the one you are considering. At least try to put your hands one one first. Necks and heel joints vary wildly on SGs and you might not like a particular version. The earliest 1961 designs have essentially no heel, providing access to the highest frets (22) that is almost unheard of. I've heard people describe it as as disorienting when they first try one.

    Good hunting.
     
  3. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    Let's see pics of the back of your guitar, the body and headstock, jk67sg
     
  4. Koison

    Koison New Member

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    Hey guys, i'm back. What you think bout this one? My friend found this one for me, super cheap (about half the price of a brand new one). I was about to get a brand new 2018 Special next week with minihumbuckers (The reason for my doubts, since i want to play some heavy stuff thru it...) when this one came out.

    Apparently it's a 2006 Faded. Seems like it's been repainted and with a white pickguard, clearly, that doesn't look stock.

    The add says it includes Gibson Burstbuckers, Gibson circuit, caps orange drop caps (Whatever that means) and case.
    I wanted to ask a couple more questions about it, but this one looks pretty decent.
     

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  5. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, so that one in the original post by all means looks to be a 2007, not a 1997. I'm not sure what the hell happened with the serial number, but by 2007 they changed the control cavity shape to the early '60s style and began using that style of TRC (not to mention the Faded existed by then). It may be the photo, but it looks like the top half of the headstock's back is refinished a little darker. Maybe there was some kind of damage to that area and the serial and MIA stamp had to be sanded off? Then, I can only assume the owner thought a '97 would be more valuable than a 2007 (some people really buy into that '90s Gibson hype), so they fudged the serial?

    Sounds like a good deal. This one is real, and the refin looks well done. Burstbuckers are a big plus. Although, if you like metal, you might be better served by the minihums. Burstbuckers are medium output A2 humbuckers, meaning they're warmer and good for jazz, blues and classic rock. Gibson's Minihums are very high output and are brighter, which is good for metal.

    If you can, play both and decide which sound you prefer.
     
    cerebral gasket likes this.
  6. Von Trapp

    Von Trapp Well-Known Member

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    I'm an avid metal player and I'm here to testify that the Burstbuckers are simply b!tchin. When I got my 2008 Diablo I had read about them and was prepared to swap them for something more suitable but when I plugged in I never looked back. I can dial in whatever I like with my amp and pedals, they rip, they roar, they pump and squeel. Got minihums in an other guitar and they're all good but I can't get from them what isn't there whereas I can take away what I don't want from regular humbuckers.

    All that guitar needs is a black or mirror pickguard and you're off to being a metal god. Get it.
     
    Col Mustard likes this.
  7. Koison

    Koison New Member

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  8. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    sounds like a good choice to me...
    by the way, WELCOME TO ETSG!
     

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