Any ideas on how to fix this control cavity screw hole?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by jk67SG, Aug 7, 2020.

  1. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    3,183
    Likes Received:
    4,042
    Do you call the fire department to put out a cigarette?

    No need to mess with shielding.
    Do not enlarge existing hole.
    No dowels.
    Plug it with toothpick and glue.
    Pilot new hole with pin vise.

    Vintage or not, it’s just a hole.
    A guitar is a tool, not a museum piece.
    Repair it and play it.
     
    Bad Penguin likes this.
  2. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2015
    Messages:
    7,353
    Likes Received:
    6,891
    Location:
    Sutton Québec
    That was my very first thought. If the empty hole bothers you, glue the screw head to the control plate.
     
  3. RW59

    RW59 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2020
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    45
    First thing I'd do is just wick thin superglue into the shredded side to bind the fibers. Don't flood the hole, just let the glue soak into the wood.

    Cover screws are under practically zero stress. Once the superglue hardens the hole may hold the screw sufficiently.

    If not, put a drop of Elmers or Titebond in the top of the hole and then wax the screw and put it in wet. The glue will form threads, let it dry then remove the screw, pop on the cover, reinsert the screw.

    Those threads will be weak. But unless you're dealing with a warped cover you don't need to torque the screw super tight. Be gentle and the hole will hold the screw sufficiently forever.
     
    cerebral gasket likes this.
  4. RW59

    RW59 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2020
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    45
    BTW, a screw waxing tip:

    I used to just rub screws against a block of wax. But that mostly leaves big chunks of wax clinging to the screw that fall off while you're screwing it in.

    Now I scrape lightly so there are just a few chunks, then kiss the threads with a flame from a lighter. The wax instantly melts and spreads, wicking up and down leaving a very thin coat on the whole threaded area.
     
  5. Von Trapp

    Von Trapp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2016
    Messages:
    686
    Likes Received:
    428
    Location:
    Sweden
    Sorry, I was unclear, I meant use the toothpics and glue to fill the old hole and then drill a new one.
     
  6. Von Trapp

    Von Trapp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2016
    Messages:
    686
    Likes Received:
    428
    Location:
    Sweden
    Exactly, what he said.
     
    cerebral gasket likes this.
  7. Chubbles

    Chubbles Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Messages:
    653
    Likes Received:
    395
    Sorry I'm late. I had that with a cheap strat. The output jack screw hole was the same way. The area wore away, toothpicks wouldn't fill because it was odd shaped. My fix...
    natural-dap-patching-repair-21506-64_1000.jpg
    I filled the hole and area around it. I drilled it and the screw grabbed it just like natural wood.

    The hole was hidden by the jack, but it can be sanded, stained, or even painted if you want.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2020
    tolm likes this.
  8. tolm

    tolm Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2012
    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    276
    That plastic wood stuff ^^^ or some of that “putty” that you work two different bits together and then squeeze into the hole and leave to set solid. Then just drill a new hole. Won’t look pretty but it’ll be hidden under the cover anyway.
     
    Chubbles likes this.
  9. Chubbles

    Chubbles Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Messages:
    653
    Likes Received:
    395
    What he said. If you use it, remember to force it into the hole with a toothpick or something similar so you can drill it.
     
  10. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2016
    Messages:
    1,049
    Likes Received:
    986
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    That's what I was going to say, just leave it out, three screws will hold the cover just fine.
     
    rotorhead likes this.
  11. Dave The Great

    Dave The Great New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    In my personal opinion "Do no wrong to your guitar" I think the best and less invasive fix for your guitar is the most simplest approach. 1. Slice off some slivers of harwood from a scrap block laying around with an x-acto knife. 2. Put some wood glue in the hole and pack the wood slivers in tight. 3. Trim the slivers off flush with the guitar body using the x-acto knife. 4. While the glue is still wet, install the screw and let it dry. After it drys, back the screw out. Touch up the area with stain. Repair complete.
     
  12. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2015
    Messages:
    7,353
    Likes Received:
    6,891
    Location:
    Sutton Québec
    If you don't wax that screw or smear it with soap prior to installing it, you run the chance of breaking its head off next time you try to unscrew it. Don't ask why I know.
     
  13. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2013
    Messages:
    558
    Likes Received:
    286
    Break off a piece of toothpick in the hole and screw your cover back on and forget about it and play that mofo! :yesway:
     
    DrBGood likes this.
  14. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2013
    Messages:
    558
    Likes Received:
    286
    After thinking about it awhile, I think I'd inject the hole with some epoxy and once hardened drill a pilot hole for the screw.
     
  15. 76Standard

    76Standard New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    Had the same problem with my 76 Standard. To keep as original and invisible as possible I filled the hole with patch (wood glue with sawdust). First moisten the hole to give the glue it’s best chance. The glue will also seep in and strengthen the weak side fibers next to the cavity. Next, in the cover, oblong the hole away from the cavity with a Dremel or file (or you could patch the hole with 2 part epoxy dyed black and re-drill in the correct location). Last, drill hole in correct location in the guitar using new hole in cover as a guide. This way you keep the original cover. Note: trying to build the side up a bit with wood patch always fails (it breaks off), and looks bad.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2020

Share This Page