Brand new neck twisted

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by LPBR, Oct 17, 2014.

  1. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    So, this is the very first neck I made. It is fretted already but not leveled yet. Also I didn't install it in the guitar yet.

    Case is that it was perfect flat when I made it but then it was left resting in the shop for a few months before I pick it again. Then I glued the fretboard on it and finally fretted it.

    A couple days ago I was sight it down and guess what: it is twisted. Using a steel rule I figured that the first treble side fret is about 1mm lower than the its bass side, what means that it is 1mm counter-clock wise twisted.

    Question is: there is something that can be done or this neck is doomed to lay down into the scrap can?

    :dunno:
     
  2. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,513
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    Location:
    London, sitting in the garden
    You can't un-twist it, if that is what you mean. You need to take out all the frets and sand it flat again. But first it is probably best to leave it in the house for a few more months in case it is going to twist some more.

    How long had the wood been weathering indoors before you cut it to size?
     
  3. mormonvoodoo

    mormonvoodoo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2014
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    255
    Location:
    Northern KY/Downtown Cincinnati
    There is a company (or was, not sure if they exist anymore) called Burrell Guitars in Huntington, WV that made guitars with twisted necks. Hold on, let me see if I can find a pic or a website.

    EDIT: Here ya go - http://www.thepowerhour.com/news2/burrell_guitars.htm

    Thing is, I played a few when I was at their shop. They play incredibly well. Crazy, I know.
     
  4. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    I think that the wood was relatively new. I picked it from lumberstore. It was a tigerwood board that I bought for another purpose and then I had this scrap laying around and decided to make it a neck. Probably it wasn't too dry, but due to the fact that this is a very hard wood and NORMALLY it doesn't suffer too much of warping I thought that I would be safe. This is the major problem I experience when working with wood in my area. Mostly of stuff I get is from lumberstore and seems that due to the high deman they don't await for the proper drying time. I have had several problems with warp and shrinking on other projects (furniture). I think I have to start buying specific wood for guitar making.

    :(

    So I believe that the solution (other than dispose the neck) will be remove the fretboard, glue a new UNFINISHED one and radius with it in place. This way the fretboard will compensate the neck twist.

    :hmm:
     
  5. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    Very interesting! I don't believe that MY neck will play that well though!

    :laugh2:
     
    mormonvoodoo likes this.
  6. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,513
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    Location:
    London, sitting in the garden
    Martin have hit on a brilliant solution to all this, and I now have two of their guitars that use it (Any model with an X in it). They use laminated wood for the neck. Those necks simply don't move - hot, cold, wet, dry they are the most stable things you could imagine. Laminate is way ahead of solid wood when it comes to precision engineering, like a guitar.

    Just not for the sound board - not yet, anyway.
     
  7. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    For laminated wood, do you mean plywood?
     
  8. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,513
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    Location:
    London, sitting in the garden
    They make the laminate themselves. Here's one of my laminated necks.

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  9. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    Oh never mind, after a quick research I got what you mean. It would be like to glue 3-5 upright thinner planks together like this:

    [​IMG]

    That's interesting... I must try this!

    :)
     
  10. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    Oh, wow! THIS is a laminate!

    :wow:
     
  11. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,513
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    Location:
    London, sitting in the garden
    No - still far too much wood in one piece. Proper laminate is the way to do it.
     
  12. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,513
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    Location:
    London, sitting in the garden
    That's a 12-string. It is over a month since I tuned it - or needed to.
     
  13. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    Well, I don't think that it is possible to make such laminating at a home shop. It surely demands some kind of industrial process.

    :(
     
  14. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,513
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    Location:
    London, sitting in the garden
    I guess. High temperatures and a press with several tons force for a start.
     
  15. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    I think that the solution for my case (for future projects) is to buy neck blanks from luthier stores instead lumber stores.

    ;)
     
  16. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,513
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    Location:
    London, sitting in the garden
    Still buy from a lumber store, but keep it at home for at least a year before you put a saw anywhere near it. Not only can wood twist, it can split, and there is no fixing that.
     
  17. LPBR

    LPBR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2014
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    34
    Good idea! Maybe I can get the best of both worlds: to put lumber store stuff on seasoning for future builds and also get from luthier stores for instant projects.

    :hmm:

    Actually I already have some scraps on my shop that I will cut to the size, date and save. I have noticed that blanks for necks and fretboards are too much more critical. Bodies are way more indulgents.

    :thumb:
     

Share This Page