Can you offer any information about this one?

Visual Guy

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https://reverb.com/item/22915310-gibson-custom-historic-62-sg-special-vos-tv-yellow

Kind of digging this one. I have asked the seller several questions but wondering if any of you may know some specifics to these yellow 62 RI Historic models. Do they release them every year, is it a limited run, etc. etc. Just looking for general info that may pertain to this line of guitars. I'll continue to get details from the seller.

Thanks in advance!
 

donepearce

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Well, the description reads like a women's bodice-ripper novel. Nice to know you are getting something which is not only unique, but also infrequent. But at three grand I wouldn't go anywhere near it. An SG should be no more than half of that.
 

Visual Guy

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Well, the description reads like a women's bodice-ripper novel. Nice to know you are getting something which is not only unique, but also infrequent. But at three grand I wouldn't go anywhere near it. An SG should be no more than half of that.

We'll typically, the Historic VOS guitars run a little higher, but I was wondering if the serial # is a representation of a true custom shop vos guitar, since the format seems different than what I see on LPs. It is cool, but I'm rather weary still.
 

donepearce

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We'll typically, the Historic VOS guitars run a little higher, but I was wondering if the serial # is a representation of a true custom shop vos guitar, since the format seems different than what I see on LPs. It is cool, but I'm rather weary still.

Whatever - it's still just an SG. It will still be made 90% on the same NC machines, and the bits that are hand-done will be the bits that are hand-done on every guitar because they have no choice. If they could only do everything on NC machines, guitars would be far better. It is always the handwork that lets them down. But I suppose some handworkers are less bad than others.

Don't be too impressed by titles like Custom Shop. It's just marketing speak.
 

Visual Guy

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Whatever - it's still just an SG. It will still be made 90% on the same NC machines, and the bits that are hand-done will be the bits that are hand-done on every guitar because they have no choice. If they could only do everything on NC machines, guitars would be far better. It is always the handwork that lets them down. But I suppose some handworkers are less bad than others.

Don't be too impressed by titles like Custom Shop. It's just marketing speak.

Kind of derailing from the initial question. Do you have any information on this specific model of guitar. When they were released, specs, etc. The seller is vague and I'd like more info since they seem to be rather unique. I'd hope someone here has had a run in with one or knows when Gibson produced the model, If they came with COA, any actual information would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

cerebral gasket

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Custom Shop Serial Number Format

Les Paul (since 1992)

M YRRR or MYRRRR
M = Model Year being reissued
Y = Production Year
RRR(R) = Production Rank

SG (since 1997)

YYRRRM
YY = Production Year
RRR = Production Rank
M = Model being reissued

Reissue Model Codes:
1 = SG Custom & Special
2 = SG Standard

020021

YY = 02
RRR = 002
M = 1

2002 SG Special (Production Rank 002)

I think the reason for the '62 designation in the listing is because the controls appear to be closer to the edge of the body compared to a '61 Reissue model.

Custom Shop guitars usually leave the factory with a COA and have the official model name stated on the paperwork.
 
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Steve D

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The SG Standard historic releases happen every year like clockwork but the SG Special seems to be far less frequent or perhaps just in fewer numbers based on the numbers you see in the secondary market.

VOS means it is 2006 or later because that’s when they started calling it that. Prior to that it was CA for custom aged or something like that. Thus by serial number is a 2002 so it’s not VOS but could be CA. Either way it means that Gibson aged up the hardware a little and cut corners on the finish by skipping the final buffing to high gloss and claimed it looks more vintage that way. Not casting stones, I have one and love it, looks great. But that’s what it is. A VOS or CA guitar should have come with a COA always, but of course it could be lost. Note: at some point they didn't just skip the final buff, they left some hazy film on it. Some say they added it to dull things, other think it's just left over polish they didn't buff off. Who knows? But a lot of people hate that stuff and work hard to polish it away. Personally, my 2006 VOS has nothing of the sort and has a pretty good shine to it so they didn't go crazy with that stuff on all of them.

I pay attention to these because I secretly lust after an SG Special historic reissue. TV Yellow ones don’t seem to come up often so it seems reasonable they’d ask a bit more. Whether it’s worth it is up to you though.
 
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Visual Guy

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The SG Standard historic releases happen every year like clockwork but the SG Special seems to be far less frequent or perhaps just in fewer numbers based on the numbers you see in the secondary market.

VOS means it is 2006 or later because that’s when they started calling it that. Prior to that it was CA for custom aged or something like that. Thus by serial number is a 2002 so it’s not VOS but could be CA. Either way it means that Gibson aged up the hardware a little and cut corners on the finish by skipping the final buffing to high gloss and claimed it looks more vintage that way. Not casting stones, I have one and love it, looks great. But that’s what it is. A VOS or CA guitar should have come with a COA always, but of course it could be lost. Note: at some point they didn't just skip the final buff, they left some hazy film on it. Some say they added it to dull things, other think it's just left over polish they didn't buff off. Who knows? But a lot of people hate that stuff and work hard to polish it away. Personally, my 2006 VOS has nothing of the sort and has a pretty good shine to it so they didn't go crazy with that stuff on all of them.

I pay attention to these because I secretly lust after an SG Special historic reissue. TV Yellow ones don’t seem to come up often so it seems reasonable they’d ask a bit more. Whether it’s worth it is up to you though.

Thanks. I found a couple others similar to this model and they were all 2002. They also had COA which this one didn't. I'm going to pass on it but it is a cool looking SG. I had my sites set on a Les Paul DC, I'm not married to anything. It seems like the seller doesn't actually know what he has after talking to him. It is slightly misleading. The serial numbers for the historic models aren't the same as a normal custom shop model I don't think. At least not on any I have seen, and I'm much more interested in a real historic like yourself vs. just something labeled "custom shop" from Gibson. None the less, good info and cool guitar!
 

cerebral gasket

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I find that some of the Custom Shop designations on the serial number format, COA and hardshell case logo to be inconsistent with each other and rather confusing.

I have a Custom Shop SG Standard with serial number format CSYRRRR. According to the main site, it explains that serial numbers with the format CSYRRRR are Custom Shop regular production models, yet the COA and hardshell case logo contains the word "Historic".

The title on the COA reads "Gibson Custom, Art & Historic. The logo on the case reads "Gibson Custom Art Historic". The back of the headstock where a volute would be located has a logo that reads "Gibson Custom Shop".

While Custom Shop guitars are nice, I don't buy into the hype that they are better quality instruments. I do enjoy my Custom Shop SG Standard Korina, but to be honest my SG Classics are my favorite ones to play and sound the best to my ears.
 
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Visual Guy

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I find that some of the Custom Shop designations on the serial number format, COA and hardshell case logo to be inconsistent with each other and rather confusing.

I have a Custom Shop SG Standard with serial number format CSYRRRR. According to the main site, it explains that serial numbers with the format CSYRRRR are Custom Shop regular production models, yet the COA and hardshell case logo contains the word "Historic".

The title on the COA reads "Gibson Custom, Art & Historic. The logo on the case reads "Gibson Custom Art Historic". The back of the headstock where a volute would be located has a logo that reads "Gibson Custom Shop".

While Custom Shop guitars are nice, I don't buy into the hype that they are better quality instruments. I do enjoy my Custom Shop SG Standard Korina, but to be honest my SG Classics are my favorite ones to play and sound the best to my ears.

I personally don't buy into the better quality instruments of "custom". I do however have lots of experience with True Historic Les Pauls and they are better guitars than just a guitar that has custom in the name from the "custom shop". I thought this was possibly some sort of Historic Reissue SG, but unfortunately it isn't. You can tell by the Serial. I have a Memphis Custom shop ES-339 that has COA, and it is a fantastic guitar. But I've played two others that were not. In short, the word "custom" means nothing to me. I trust more in the quality of a true historic release. The way this seller has this SG listed is slightly misleading in the title, so I came here to ask. It is already off my watch list now! haha.
 

Steve D

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I personally don't buy into the better quality instruments of "custom". I do however have lots of experience with True Historic Les Pauls and they are better guitars than just a guitar that has custom in the name from the "custom shop". I thought this was possibly some sort of Historic Reissue SG, but unfortunately it isn't. You can tell by the Serial. I have a Memphis Custom shop ES-339 that has COA, and it is a fantastic guitar. But I've played two others that were not. In short, the word "custom" means nothing to me. I trust more in the quality of a true historic release. The way this seller has this SG listed is slightly misleading in the title, so I came here to ask. It is already off my watch list now! haha.
I'm not sure I follow you on the serial number format. It has a six digit serial, that's appropriate for historic SG reissues. cerebral gasket posted the decoder up above. My VOS historic reissue (which has a COA) has the same six digit format. What is your concern? I get that you don't want the guitar (I toyed with it once but didn't like the maxed out truss rod so I too moved on) but I'm curious what your thoughts are on the serial.
 

cerebral gasket

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I personally don't buy into the better quality instruments of "custom". I do however have lots of experience with True Historic Les Pauls and they are better guitars than just a guitar that has custom in the name from the "custom shop". In short, the word "custom" means nothing to me. I trust more in the quality of a true historic release.

Historic, True Historic, Custom Art Historic, etc are all built in the same Custom Shop, correct? I'm still trying to grasp how they are "better quality" than a regular Gibson USA production model. It seems to me the Custom Shop is all about trying to recreate the looks and feel of a vintage instrument which includes features such as an ABR-1 bridge instead of a Nashville, finish flaws such as binding that has overspray or dye that bleeds into it. I'm not understanding how that is "better quality" than a guitar that has a modern Nashville bridge and white binding without any overspray or dye bleeding into said binding.

I couldn't care less about the subtle difference in the appearance of the knobs.

full


Personally, I favor a modern guitar that feels, plays, and sounds great with less attention to recreating vintage cosmetic details.
 
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cerebral gasket

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The quality is no better. And I think you meant to say you couldn't care less, not could.

Agreed.
Both Custom Shop and Gibson USA build great guitars IMO and I would guess for the most part they both use the same quality wood and CNC machines to build the core of the guitar. Any assumptions that the processes that have to be finished by hand are "better" on one than the other are just that, assumptions. Some folks performing hand work may pay more attention to detail than others, but that can happen in any shop.
 

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Inexpensive and very cool upgrades
yaisse_g.gif
yaisse_g.gif


Correct knobs, size and smooth reflector top


SG Standard TBK 128.jpg
 
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Visual Guy

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I'm not sure I follow you on the serial number format. It has a six digit serial, that's appropriate for historic SG reissues. cerebral gasket posted the decoder up above. My VOS historic reissue (which has a COA) has the same six digit format. What is your concern? I get that you don't want the guitar (I toyed with it once but didn't like the maxed out truss rod so I too moved on) but I'm curious what your thoughts are on the serial.

I missed the serial # format post. I was specifically looking for how Historic LPs are serialized with a 1 digit year signifying they year of their reissue. 1957 - 7 XXXX, 1958 - 8 XXXX. etc. So you can ignore me here.

Historic, True Historic, Custom Art Historic, etc are all built in the same Custom Shop, correct? I'm still trying to grasp how they are "better quality" than a regular Gibson USA production model.

This is what I was saying in my post basically, minus the Gibson USA part. The Historic Reissue models I have played have all be fantastic instruments. On the contrary I've played a few semi-hollow body guitars that have a "custom shop" label on the headstock and COA that felt like a toy, with tuning stability issues and goofy QA mishaps. Essentially I am agreeing with Don's earlier mention that "custom shop" is marketing speak. All I'm getting at is that in my personal experiences, "Custom Shop" doesn't guarantee "good", but Historic Reissue does (or has thus far). Could be coincidence, probably is. Hopefully I'm not proven wrong, probably will be. KIS.
 

Steve D

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I missed the serial # format post. I was specifically looking for how Historic LPs are serialized with a 1 digit year signifying they year of their reissue. 1957 - 7 XXXX, 1958 - 8 XXXX. etc. So you can ignore me here.



This is what I was saying in my post basically, minus the Gibson USA part. The Historic Reissue models I have played have all be fantastic instruments. On the contrary I've played a few semi-hollow body guitars that have a "custom shop" label on the headstock and COA that felt like a toy, with tuning stability issues and goofy QA mishaps. Essentially I am agreeing with Don's earlier mention that "custom shop" is marketing speak. All I'm getting at is that in my personal experiences, "Custom Shop" doesn't guarantee "good", but Historic Reissue does (or has thus far). Could be coincidence, probably is. Hopefully I'm not proven wrong, probably will be. KIS.
One thing I know for sure is that the Fender Custom shop at one time, if not to this very day, has their people build regular Fender USA production guitars when they don't have enough capavity making their relic stuff. So not only is the quality at a similar level, it is in those cases the same in regards to workmanship and skill (parts and finish might be lower quality though). I don't know if that's the case for Gibson because their custom shop is in a different city altogether, right? So it's possible they solved that capacity problem for when they don't have orders to justify guys all working on the highest end models by having them crank out those non-historic but still custom shop models. In theory, same guys = same quality but the different materials and finishes might mean they are actually less skilled at cranking out lots of guitars quickly then spending lots of time on a few. I don't know, would make an interesting case study.
 

Steve D

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Historic, True Historic, Custom Art Historic, etc are all built in the same Custom Shop, correct? I'm still trying to grasp how they are "better quality" than a regular Gibson USA production model. It seems to me the Custom Shop is all about trying to recreate the looks and feel of a vintage instrument which includes features such as an ABR-1 bridge instead of a Nashville, finish flaws such as binding that has overspray or dye that bleeds into it. I'm not understanding how that is "better quality" than a guitar that has a modern Nashville bridge and white binding without any overspray or dye bleeding into said binding.

I couldn't care less about the subtle difference in the appearance of the knobs.

full


Personally, I favor a modern guitar that feels, plays, and sounds great with less attention to recreating vintage cosmetic details.
To each his own. Some people want an ultra-modern guitar with coil split push-pull pots and compound radius fretboards and whatever the most modern advances in luthier science is. Others enjoy buying a survivor and restoring it. Still others like getting a cheap guitar and putting custom touches on it, modding it into something that plays and sounds great and gives them satisfaction every time they play that they made it so.

For me, I love the vintage Gibson SGs. I love the look, the history, and the sounds they made that were part of my whole life. I don't gig, I play in my home for fun, plus after diddlng for 35 years I only now made the decision to actually get serious about playing well. So I'm not really any good. Consequently the ultra-modern stuff is wasted on me. But the true vintage stuff is beyond what I'm willing to spend (plus I don't really want to deal with being scared to scratch the guitar every time I picked up up). When I decided to scratch my SG itch, I went for a cheap SG Special. I love it. But it didn't quite scratch the itch all the way, it didn't have that classic old school look or feel or sound that I love so much. So I went looking for a 61 reissue and found my VOS one for about $200 more than most used '61s were selling for and that was worth it to me, so I did it.

I don't care if the knobs are perfect though. For crying out loud, I got one without a lyre vibrola and if they are going to sell such a model they should put plugs in the body to make it look truly like a real one where the lyre was removed if they want absolute authenticity. But they didn't (and I don't mind that) so how could I get worked up about the font on the knobs? I know it's not really original and I'm not trying to make people think it is so I don't care.
 

cerebral gasket

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Some people want an ultra-modern guitar with coil split push-pull pots and compound radius fretboards and whatever the most modern advances in luthier science is. Others enjoy buying a survivor and restoring it. Still others like getting a cheap guitar and putting custom touches on it, modding it into something that plays and sounds great and gives them satisfaction every time they play that they made it so.

What I meant by a modern SG was my SG Classic. I'm not into coil splits since P-90's are my choice of pickup. The compound radius fretboards don't appeal to me, as I favor a thicker rounded necks. SG Classics are basically reissues of a late 60's SG Special, but with the modern 1-11/16 nut width and Nashville bridge with stop bar tailpiece. The neck binding is white and doesn't have any traces of overspray that wasn't scraped or any dyes that bleed through discoloring said binding to make it look vintage. It just looks fresh like a modern SG but with Classic look, hence the model name "Classic". That's what I meant by modern.
 

PermissionToLand

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Whatever - it's still just an SG. It will still be made 90% on the same NC machines, and the bits that are hand-done will be the bits that are hand-done on every guitar because they have no choice. If they could only do everything on NC machines, guitars would be far better. It is always the handwork that lets them down. But I suppose some handworkers are less bad than others.

Don't be too impressed by titles like Custom Shop. It's just marketing speak.

Yeah, none of that is true. The Custom Shop is a dedicated shop separate from the USA production line and the guitars there are built by their most experienced luthiers like Tom Murphy. That is not a case of "less bad handwork". Not only are different production techniques used, but features and materials are different as well.

Custom Shop Serial Number Format

Les Paul (since 1992)

M YRRR or MYRRRR
M = Model Year being reissued
Y = Production Year
RRR(R) = Production Rank

SG (since 1997)

YYRRRM
YY = Production Year
RRR = Production Rank
M = Model being reissued

Reissue Model Codes:
1 = SG Custom & Special
2 = SG Standard

020021

YY = 02
RRR = 002
M = 1

2002 SG Special (Production Rank 002)

I think the reason for the '62 designation in the listing is because the controls appear to be closer to the edge of the body compared to a '61 Reissue model.

Custom Shop guitars usually leave the factory with a COA and have the official model name stated on the paperwork.

The seller is wrong, there was no '62 SG Special Reissue. It's a '61 just like any other. The only '62s Gibson ever made were the predecessor to the '61 RI from 1986-1991 and the Guitar Center limited run from 2005 that was only different for having Grovers.

The SG Standard historic releases happen every year like clockwork but the SG Special seems to be far less frequent or perhaps just in fewer numbers based on the numbers you see in the secondary market.

VOS means it is 2006 or later because that’s when they started calling it that. Prior to that it was CA for custom aged or something like that. Thus by serial number is a 2002 so it’s not VOS but could be CA. Either way it means that Gibson aged up the hardware a little and cut corners on the finish by skipping the final buffing to high gloss and claimed it looks more vintage that way. Not casting stones, I have one and love it, looks great. But that’s what it is. A VOS or CA guitar should have come with a COA always, but of course it could be lost. Note: at some point they didn't just skip the final buff, they left some hazy film on it. Some say they added it to dull things, other think it's just left over polish they didn't buff off. Who knows? But a lot of people hate that stuff and work hard to polish it away. Personally, my 2006 VOS has nothing of the sort and has a pretty good shine to it so they didn't go crazy with that stuff on all of them.

I pay attention to these because I secretly lust after an SG Special historic reissue. TV Yellow ones don’t seem to come up often so it seems reasonable they’d ask a bit more. Whether it’s worth it is up to you though.

The Historic Special was continually produced until 2013 and TV Yellow was a standard color option. However, they were certainly less popular than the Standard, so you see less of them. Same goes for the TV Yellow option.

You're right that VOS was not introduced until 2006, so this is not a 2002. It's actually a 2012. They changed the format in 2010 so that only the 2nd digit denotes the year and the first always seems to be a 0, possibly denoting the decade from here on out?

I find that some of the Custom Shop designations on the serial number format, COA and hardshell case logo to be inconsistent with each other and rather confusing.

I have a Custom Shop SG Standard with serial number format CSYRRRR. According to the main site, it explains that serial numbers with the format CSYRRRR are Custom Shop regular production models, yet the COA and hardshell case logo contains the word "Historic".

The title on the COA reads "Gibson Custom, Art & Historic. The logo on the case reads "Gibson Custom Art Historic". The back of the headstock where a volute would be located has a logo that reads "Gibson Custom Shop".

While Custom Shop guitars are nice, I don't buy into the hype that they are better quality instruments. I do enjoy my Custom Shop SG Standard Korina, but to be honest my SG Classics are my favorite ones to play and sound the best to my ears.

It's confusing when it comes to SGs because they don't follow the usual rules. In fact, they are the opposite, special models use the "regular" format with a CS prefix while standard models use that one unique to SGs.

That's why your Korina limited run uses the CS prefix but a regular old Historic SG Standard uses the one posted above.

The thing about the Korina model is that it's basically a USA Standard built by the Custom Shop. For some reason, they chose not to use the (then) newly designed Historic SG specs.

I personally don't buy into the better quality instruments of "custom". I do however have lots of experience with True Historic Les Pauls and they are better guitars than just a guitar that has custom in the name from the "custom shop". I thought this was possibly some sort of Historic Reissue SG, but unfortunately it isn't. You can tell by the Serial. I have a Memphis Custom shop ES-339 that has COA, and it is a fantastic guitar. But I've played two others that were not. In short, the word "custom" means nothing to me. I trust more in the quality of a true historic release. The way this seller has this SG listed is slightly misleading in the title, so I came here to ask. It is already off my watch list now! haha.

There are no "fake" solidbody Custom Shop models, they are all part of the Historic Collection. Any solidbody guitar Gibson puts the word "Custom" on is coming from the Custom Shop, since 1993. Now, just because a seller claims something is a Custom does not make it true, but in this case, it is. The COA may be missing, but this is unmistakably a Historic Special.

This is what I was saying in my post basically, minus the Gibson USA part. The Historic Reissue models I have played have all be fantastic instruments. On the contrary I've played a few semi-hollow body guitars that have a "custom shop" label on the headstock and COA that felt like a toy, with tuning stability issues and goofy QA mishaps. Essentially I am agreeing with Don's earlier mention that "custom shop" is marketing speak. All I'm getting at is that in my personal experiences, "Custom Shop" doesn't guarantee "good", but Historic Reissue does (or has thus far). Could be coincidence, probably is. Hopefully I'm not proven wrong, probably will be. KIS.

This explains the confusion. While all "Custom" solidbodies are made in the Nashville Custom Shop, some time ago Gibson decided that everything made in the Memphis (semi-hollow/archtop) factory were suddenly "Gibson Custom" products (notice they don't actually say "Custom Shop"), when they had not actually changed anything but the name and added a COA. They still have the regular serial number format and "Made in USA" stamps that true Custom Shops do not. Add to that the fact that Memphis products tend to be less well-regarded than even standard line Nashville products. I have certainly been disappointed by the few Gibson semi-hollows I have tried out.

In fact, the true high end semi-hollow/archtop models are built in the Nashville Custom Shop. That should tell you everything you need to know about whether Memphis is actually a custom shop or not.

Don't let their misuse of the Custom Shop name on Memphis products affect your views of the actual Custom Shop.

The SG in question, for $2,500 is in the normal range of price for these. The resale value is quite high on Historics. This model would have been $3,000 new.
 
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