Do You Play Your SG Differently?

NMA

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Certain guitars are approached and played differently. For example, my Rickenbackers...
- I never palm mute,
- I play tons of arpeggios,
- never use reverb,
- I rarely use bar chords (I go for inversions and let open strings ring out)
- I use a light picking technique (never dig in hard)

Well, how about our SGs? How do you approach them? What specifically do you do or not do with your playing of them? Me...
- I add a bit of grit to my amps (just a touch that you would never notice, but noticeable to me because I only play my Rics, Fenders, and Gretsches totally clean)

You? What specifically do you do when you approach/play your SG?
 

DRC68

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I just hack away with ineptitude and let the guitar do the rest, LOL. It really wants to sing better than I let it.

I try not to use bar chords either unless absolutely necessary, because I love the way the open strings resonate on the SG. I also find that I am more driven to experimentation with my playing because the fretboard is so accessible, more so than other guitars I've owned.
 

Biddlin

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What specifically do you do when you approach/play your SG?
I wipe my hands, wipe the guitar and play on. Only technique changes I make are wearing it a little lower than my Les Pauls ad using more nuanced pick attack.
 

Go Nigel Go

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The only thing I really do differently on my SG is avoid "fingerpicking" as I would classical style. My '71 SG has a 1.50 inch nut width, and it just doesn't work "finger style". Everything else is fair game, and I use all the other tools in my players toolbox to good effect.
 

Pointyfan

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I try to play it differently, but I suck on it just like I do my other guitars.. To answer your question though, I tend to play more rock and blues on it, where I will play some jazzy and pop stuff on my Les Paul and other guitars, it just doesn't seem right on the SG...
 
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sparky88

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Up until I got my SG a couple of years ago I was almost entirely a Strat player.

After getting it my first thoughts were that I'd made a mistake, I didn't like the 50s chunky neck and thought I might have to sell it and get a slim 60s neck SG instead. But after getting used to it I love the chunky feel and I've played almost nothing else since (I'm now thinking of selling my Les Paul and getting a chunky necked one too!)

There's just something about the SG that brings out that Angus Young heavy vibrato and attitude that I find hard to replicate on any other guitar.

Listening back to recordings before and after getting the SG there's no doubt it changes the way I play.
 
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Wild Bill212

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the only guitar I have that gets a different approach is a Les Paul Custom, the neck is such a monster I have to play an open 'A' differently, if I don't, it actually hurts my finger.
 

Neezduts89

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One thing that I do differently with my SG compared to other guitars, is I roll the volume A LOT more. I love the sound of the pickups with the volume rolled a bit above half way. Instead of clicking off multiple pedals, like my overdrive, I usually just roll down the volume to get a cleaner tone, and my SG has been great for this. The amount of tone I get out of it is crazy compared to any other guitar I’ve played. I’m not sure if I got lucky, or if this is just a typical Sg trait. From what I’ve read, it seems to be pretty common, and that alone makes it a much more versatile guitar in my opinion
 
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TimJ

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I don’t *play* any differently as such, but the only thing that does happen on an SG for me that doesn’t happen on any other guitar, is running out of fretboard
(if you immediately thought, “spot the self-indulgent shredder”, you’re right on the money).

This is testament to the excellent upper fret access that SGs have.

My first SG was a Gibson SG Special Faded (22 frets), where I used to overshoot the top end quite often.

I now have 2 24-fretters, an SG 60s Tribute and an Epiphone SG Prophecy...but even with those it’s so easy to get way up into the sonic stratosphere that I sometimes reach for a mystery 25th fret.

Perhaps I just need to build in one of those recorded messages for idiots that warn you when you’re reaching the end of an escalator... “You...are...reaching...the...end...of...the...available...notes”.
 

Col Mustard

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I use different guitars for different songs. So because of that, I probably play differently
because I'm trying for a different sound. I have experimented with playing a song on an
SG that I normally play on acoustic. What I find is that the SG frees me much more than
any other kind of guitar, so I might end up changing the sound of the song because the
SG adds so much. I might just change picks. I tend to use a lighter pick and a lighter
touch on an SG. I tend to keep my thumb behind the neck better on an SG. That's very
freeing.

>The clean tones of my neck '57 classic are actually stunning, played through my
Vox VT-30. That's why I kept my two SGs and sold the rest of my Electrics (or fostered
them with colleagues).
Round and woody tones useful for certain songs, or for certain sections of
certain songs. Play it with the neck p'up, then step on a pedal...

Then flip to the bridge p'up the '57 Classic plus... and it's a whole 'nother beast.
A much more edgy sound, but you can EQ it to shriek or growl. The '57 Classic plus
might be my favorite pickup. If I had any reason now to indulge in a custom guitar, I'd
want the '57 Classic plus in the NECK position, and maybe a Dirty Fingers in the Bridge.
Both are extremely versatile. That's something I like, and that's what I like about
the SG.

But I think SGs and '57s are made for each other. This combination can do just about
anything. Same for P-90s... Certain Genres... no, you need something else.
Everybody on here knows this.
So there are certain songs that need a Telecaster, Or an Ibanez Shredder.
The SG covers a lot of ground in between those, and I play it differently depending
on the tone I'm after. My SGs respond beautifully to this.
 

VSG

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I find it to have more ease of playability than my LP Tribute (chunky neck). My SG is a 2017 (actually got it in Oct. of 2016) SG Worn.
 

Marky Forrest

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I like Strats and have since I was 12 years old. I have more Strats than any other guitar. However, the easiest guitar I have to play and the one that makes me sound the best is my one and only SG. That guitar is just so sweet to play. I don't play it much differently than a Strat except maybe a little lighter attack. I just love that SG and will never part with it.
 

Bob Womack

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Two things:
1. The SG has a certain midrange honk that loves to be overdriven a bit. As Col Mustard related, the '57 Classics on my SG emphasize that nicely. When I pull back on the tone control on the bridge pickup, the '57 Classic Plus honks really smoothly.
2. The forward-thrust neck makes me push the body back further than I do with any other guitar, in order to bring the neck to the same relative position it enjoys with my others. That means it sits ON the lower horn rather than in the waist of the guitar when I'm seated. A quirk. I've noticed that many other players do this as well, seated or standing.

Bob
 

Kyle Lanning

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I don’t *play* any differently as such, but the only thing that does happen on an SG for me that doesn’t happen on any other guitar, is running out of fretboard
(if you immediately thought, “spot the self-indulgent shredder”, you’re right on the money).

This is testament to the excellent upper fret access that SGs have.

My first SG was a Gibson SG Special Faded (22 frets), where I used to overshoot the top end quite often.

I now have 2 24-fretters, an SG 60s Tribute and an Epiphone SG Prophecy...but even with those it’s so easy to get way up into the sonic stratosphere that I sometimes reach for a mystery 25th fret.

Perhaps I just need to build in one of those recorded messages for idiots that warn you when you’re reaching the end of an escalator... “You...are...reaching...the...end...of...the...available...notes”.

Being a strat player for nearly 20 years, I found that when I got my SG last year I would often overshoot my notes all over the fretboard. I think it had to do with the heel placement more than anything as both my strat and SG have 22 frets. The different scale length could also be a small factor. But I'd be ready to rip a solo on an Am slow blues tune and shoot past the 5th fret up to the 7th all the time til I got used to it.
 

NMA

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Being a strat player for nearly 20 years, I found that when I got my SG last year I would often overshoot my notes all over the fretboard. ... I'd be ready to rip a solo on an Am slow blues tune and shoot past the 5th fret up to the 7th all the time till I got used to it.

Yup. That was the most befuddling thing for me with my new SG. My fret hand always seemed to land two frets away from where it was supposed to be! I have had my SG now for eight years and it still happens to this day. I own a dozen electric guitars...only on the SG does that happen.
 


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