EASY F CHORD I been working on

Discussion in 'Lessons & Techniques' started by Tazz3, Jan 19, 2015.

  1. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Active Member

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    Hey all, I found this easy F chord and I been working on it all day.
    Its kinda shaped like a c chord.now I have to build it in my muscle memeory.
    Here is a pic of it YOU KNOW WHAT THEY SAY F Means fail
     

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  2. LeadFinger

    LeadFinger Well-Known Member

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    Ha, I cheat and use that sometimes when I have to make a fast chord change. The old school F sounds a lot more satisfying tho.
     
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  3. Bullfrog

    Bullfrog Well-Known Member

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    Wrap your thumb over the neck and catch the low F on the 6th string, first fret.

    Not technically correct, but it was good enough for Hendrix!
     
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  4. frankd

    frankd Well-Known Member

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    And P as in Pit bull as in never quit trying.
     
  5. Metal89

    Metal89 Well-Known Member

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    Back when I was in a church band, NOBODY could do a proper F chord.(2 of us electric 1 acoustic) We ended up doing just this!
     
  6. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Active Member

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    one day i will learn the old school F the thing with that one is barring the E & B with the same finger lol
     
  7. jtcnj

    jtcnj Well-Known Member

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    I just started working the "proper" one into my practice progressions. If you just focus on fingering the first finger a bit first, you'll find where both strings ring cleanly for you with less pressure.
    When you plant the other 2 fingers it causes the first to shift a little, but if you hold it and then repeat landing it, it starts to feel more natural.
    It hurt a lot at first (for me anyway) squeezing too hard.

    I'm more partial to learning the "proper" forms and good technique first, then experiment with the alternates depending on where you are going or coming from.

    F and C and similar shapes are a nice jump off to G as well, although it doesnt seem so at first.

    Though not an anchor like A-D-E major, the first finger at that spot is also a nice jump for Am, Dm.

    Just my $.02 from a beginners viewpoint too. I share the enthusiasm I see in your posts as well!! I see you have been on this forum a few months, I just found it. Sorry if I am repeating what I guess is common knowledge; I'm a ....noob.
     
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  8. LeadFinger

    LeadFinger Well-Known Member

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    The by-product of hassling with the old school F is that you can move that chord shape up the board to make other exciting chords.
     
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  9. Crazy_8

    Crazy_8 Well-Known Member

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    Actually that is a proper F chord, abiet not a full barre chord.

    Basic chords are triads:

    4th string third fret is an F (root)
    3rd string second fret is an A (third)
    2nd string first fret is a C (fifth)

    So you do gave a full F chord, again not a full barre.

    When I played jazz I would often comp with chords such as this up and down the neck in order to play both chord and melody at the same time as this is a movable form.

    It is nice to know the full chords, but when playing in large bands (think jazz bands with brass) it actually sounds better sometimes because you as a guitarist are allowing sonic space for the other instruments. Even in rock genres power chords such as this are often used.
     
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  10. Heket

    Heket Well-Known Member

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    It is indeed a full triad, you're not adding anything other than octave depth with any more strings being used, if a triad chord is your goal. You do have to pay special attention to your picking hand though, to make sure you hit all the right strings and don't catch that 1st string on the way out.
     
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  11. Crazy_8

    Crazy_8 Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely, the open 1st string is an E which would transform the chord into a F Maj 7th.
    I usually mute the 1st string with the finger which is fretting the second string, done and done.
     
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  12. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Active Member

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    Ok I started working on the real f with baring the E & B strings, doing this easy f kinda helped me lol
    Also I think iam just going to learn just chords and work on my chord changes between them and learn songs later I kinda make up my own songs with the chords I know and learn real songs later.
    This is a life time of learning iam in no rush I won't be no jimi or srv lol
     
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  13. Robus

    Robus Active Member

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    I tend to play a lot of my chords up the neck to give the bass room to breath. The F I seem to use the most is barred at the 5th fret, fingered in the C chord shape (x-8-7-5-6-5). The quicky way of doing it is to lose the low root and play just the upper four strings (x-x-7-5-6-5) with gives you an inversion with the third (A) in the root. It's close to the shape of a Dm7 which is pretty convenient when your playing in keys like C that use both. Anyone else do that?

    I almost never play full 6 string chords on electric guitar. They seem to muddy up the arrangement.
     
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  14. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    F chord... Hmmmmmm Always has been and always will be a pain in the......

    I have had the same problem everyone goes thru when it comes to playing the F chord. So over time, I found that when placing the 1st finger on string 1 & 2 first fret and following with the 2nd & 3rd finger, the arching of the fingers becomes important. And everybody knows that... and has trouble with it. But as time went by, I found the structure of the "standard F" is the basis for a "Barr F"/ E pattern. And over more time found it was easier and quicker to grab the 6th string 1st fret with my thumb. "Proper Guitar Structure?"...... maybe not, but I guess it comes down to whether you are working towards perfect guitar playing etiquette or playing the best sounding music possible... your choice. Now I play either of 3 styles of F depending on the sound I need for what I'm playing. As a rhythm player I want to give the fullest sound possible (in the right places) so playing as many stings as possible is important in that function. :smile:
     
  15. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    .... and BTW, I know there are a ton of different ways and places to play an F but come on, really... how many do you actually use?
     
  16. Crazy_8

    Crazy_8 Well-Known Member

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    I play a chord / melody style that places me all over the neck, admittedly not the usual "rock" guitarist style. The "C" form as well as the "A" forms. Just as much as the "E" (F) form in fact. It depends on how I arrange the song.

    I imagine that if one is just banging out chords as per a "chart" one might not wander from first position.

    So it depends on one's playing style.
     
  17. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    ... and knowing the different positions helps you find the better sound.
     
  18. lineboat

    lineboat Well-Known Member

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    I play about 3 different styles of F as well. And it's hard to tell the difference to the common ear. A little dirt, other instruments cranked, nobody can tell what's what! I've switched positions while playing State of Love&Trust, and even other band members didn't notice. So my theory is, make it easy on yourself!
     
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  19. Rain

    Rain Well-Known Member

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    I can't remember the last time I played a so-called correct F (barre).

    I have big hands/huge thumbs and "correct" positions tend to feel uncomfortable to me - especially around the wrist. Most barre chords just make more sense using that thumb.

    [​IMG]

    My classical guitar teacher used to slap it with her ruler... LOL

    As for the rest, there's tons of ways to voice a chord - you can spice it up a bit, move things around... Whatever works best in context - indeed, sometimes, the standard voicing is the best option.
     
  20. LeadFinger

    LeadFinger Well-Known Member

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    "My classical guitar teacher used to slap it with her ruler... LOL"

    Mine was a nazi about proper positioning. I think he grew up before they had the blues or something.
     
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