Gibson has certainly changed...

Discussion in 'Other Guitars' started by Clifdawg, May 9, 2019.

  1. Clifdawg

    Clifdawg Well-Known Member

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    ... I never thought they'd be the budget option for US-made guitars. Just found out that these new Gibson G-45 acoustics are incoming... Solid spruce tops, solid walnut back and sides, walnut fingerboards, and satin nitro finishes in a lovely J-45 slope-shoulder dread body shape. Electrified with the minimally-invasive Fishman sonitone system. All US-made in Montana for $999. Oh, and it comes with a hard case.

    [​IMG]

    By contrast, you can barely get an all-solid acoustic-electric with a hard case imported for that kind of money. Since it appears I'll be getting a raise soon, I think I'm gonna save up for one of these bad boys. :thumb:

    I like the places Gibson are going with their electric and acoustic lines. Focus on the basics, reduce the margins, and put quality US-made instruments in the hands of players at prices that most people can afford with a little elbow grease and some discipline.
     
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  2. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    That's a nice-looking no-nonsense guitar. Let's hope it plays and sounds as well as it looks.
     
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  3. arcticsg

    arcticsg Well-Known Member

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    G-45 Studio $999

    G-45 Standard $1299
     
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  4. GrumpyOldDBA

    GrumpyOldDBA Well-Known Member

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    This is a budget option guitar?

    I dunno about acoustics but thought yamaha is a player at below that level?
     
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  5. Clifdawg

    Clifdawg Well-Known Member

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    Comparatively speaking. The A3 series of guitars by Yamaha are some of the best all-solid guitars under a grand you can buy, but even they start at 800 bucks and are made in China. Even the all-solid Epiphone Masterbilts are close to 700. Mexican laminate-construction Taylors well exceed the thousand-dollar mark.

    So, a thousand bucks for a US-made, all-solid acoustic is actually pretty cheap.
     
  6. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    If I was in the market for a guitar of this type, I would go for what I already have - a Martin DX1R. It has a rich and bright tone, and the best-made neck on any guitar I've ever seen. A vertical arrangement of thin laminations that never moves. It's had one truss rod adjustment since I bought it. The soundboard is a nice piece of spruce, and the rest of the body, which doesn't do anything acoustically because it is totally damped by contact with your body - is a moulded composite. They really got so many things right when they designed this guitar.
    And I think it is probably a touch cheaper than the Gibson. And I liked it enough to buy the 12-string version too.
    martins.jpg
     
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  7. michaelinokc

    michaelinokc Well-Known Member

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    I'd love to compare it to my Epiphone Masterbilt and see how it sounds and plays.
     
  8. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Cool thread, I'll add what I know.

    I bought a 2018 Gibson J-45 Avante Guard, which is close to the one
    you describe above. Mine was twice the price at about $1800, but was
    developed under the Henry J administration...

    Mine looks like this:
    J-45 AG45WNN8.jpg
    Lots of the same features, except for the cutaway.
    Mine has Walnut back and sides, Spruce top, Maple neck, Walnut bridge and
    Walnut fretboard, tusq nut and bridge saddle, Grover mini tuners, Baggs "Element"
    under saddle pickup.

    If you can get a guitar like this for a thousand dollars, I'd suggest you POUNCE!
    I really like mine. When I first received it, it sounded very bright bright bright...
    And it still is more bright than many of my colleagues' guitars. But those all have years of abuse under their belts... The bright tone is also very sweet, and has
    lots of sustain and character. It's a unique tone. I like guitars with unique tones,
    because my musical style is open to influences like this.
    56@100.jpg
    The bright tone is part of the package. I have modified mine by the following
    countermeasures:

    1. "Bluegrass" style acoustic strings, with light top and medium bottom. These are made by Martin and D'Addario among other makers.

    2. Ebony bridge pins... These actually do make a difference. The stock pins are
    made of Tusq, which is an excellent material, but maybe contributes to the
    brightness. Ebony moderates this a bit, and isn't very expensive. Play yours as
    issued for a few months, and then change strings and insert the Ebony pins and
    make up your own mind.

    3. Time... I've been listening to my J-45 for like 14 months, and the tone has
    changed and moderated over that time... It's still changing as we speak, so
    I can't wait for more time to pass so I can hear the effect.

    4. EQ... I play my Gibson through a pedal board which includes some crucial
    modifiers that make my J-45's amplified tone really effective IMHO.
    Zelda Pedalboard 2018@100.jpg
    This pedal board's components might add up to almost as much as you may spend on the Gibson you describe. I'll run through the effects so you can get an idea of
    how I'm using my new guitar. The instrument plugs in at right, and the Boss
    Tu-3 tuner will mute its signal while tuning, or while on stand. Pick up the guitar, tune it, and stomp that Boss pedal and you're live.

    The next pedal is the TC Electronics "Body Rez" pedal, which adds a subtle warmth to the tone of an undersaddle guitar pickup.

    Next is the TC Electronics "Hall of Fame" reverb unit... love the tone of this.
    Next is the TC Electronics "Afterglow" Chorus unit. I like using chorus on an acoustic guitar... but don't usually use the Chorus and the Reverb at the same
    time.

    Next is the heart of an acoustic guitar's pedal board: The Fishman Pro-EQ
    Platinum Plus... which is a pre-amp, and a graphic EQ, and a D.I. box all in
    one. Very useful. Mine is an old one, and they likely have a new and improved
    version for sale now. Mine has given great service for two decades, maybe more.
    I cain't recall now, when I put that box into service. It has never failed.

    Baggs makes a similar box, and that one works great, according to my colleagues whose opinions I respect.

    Having an acoustic with an under saddle pickup, these effects are important
    IMHO. They give the player the control he needs over the tones and ambience
    of the guitar signal.

    Good luck in your quest.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
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