****..... got rooked :(

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Samuel Fuentes, Aug 6, 2021.

  1. Samuel Fuentes

    Samuel Fuentes New Member

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    On E-bay I saw a cosmetically beat up '72, EB3L. Already 0wning an '07 SG, I liked the idea of a "Long Scale". When she arrived, she was beat up for sure. The finish was checked and cracked with damage going down to the bare wood. The frets needed replacing and the eletronics looked "Iffy".
    I was going to send her back to Gibson for re-finishing, but they took so long to get back to me, that I decided to go to a local luthier. 6 months later, she's back in my hands and she looks great! Now as I start to look her over, I start noticing. She has 21 Frets. The '72 Eb-3L's had 20 frets. The 21 Fretters were EB-3's. The scale length of the "L's" were 34", mine are 31". In short, I got rooked. The bass is not an "L", it is short scale, 72 EB-3.
    Knowing that re-finishing would be expensive, I tried to ID her before sending her out. I posted on this forum but all the replies, I got, never said whether or not it was an "L".
    Of course I tried the serial # on the back of the headstock. but in '72 they were not stamped "INTO" the wood. I screwed up and did not record the serial # before sending her out. In the finishing process, the #'s, and the "Made in USA" were deleted.
    Re-finishing her totally wiped out "The good price I paid for her". and now I have two basically same guitars. An 07 SG and a 72 EB-3. One's gotta go. :(
     
  2. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Damn that would piss me off. But the choice is easy - get rid of the one that is going to remind you of pain every time you look at it. There will be others.
     
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  3. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    How sad that you managed to "rook" yourself.
    The stains on my pillow bespeak the grief in my heart for you.:naughty:
     
  4. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    The short scale version is way better.
     
  5. Chuteboxehero

    Chuteboxehero Well-Known Member

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    In all fairness this is the EverythingSG forum. You should have posted it on EverythingEB3. Also did you know about the difference in the number of frets before you bought it?
     
  6. Decadent Dan

    Decadent Dan Active Member

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    A quick glance at Reverb tells me the pickup position is a dead giveaway
     
  7. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    The seller probably didn't know the difference, just like you apparently didn't. If the long scale matters so much to you, it would seem obvious that you need to be more conscious of what you're looking at when shopping. Try shopping for a laptop with a specific graphics card that isn't even denoted in the name but is buried in the specs list (which are often just copied and pasted by lazy websites). The listings will look identical (because they literally look identical on the exterior) until you read through them fully.

    The serial numbers definitely were stamped into the wood in 1972, but it's hard for any luthier to preserve them with all the sanding necessary. A good luthier would consult the owner how they want to handle that. Some will recreate it with their own stamp, or ink it on, etc.
     
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  8. pancake81

    pancake81 Well-Known Member

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    In short, that sucks…. No way around it.

    okay, so now you have two of the same guitar, which do you sell? Which plus better? Which can you recoup the best dollar out of (assuming they play equal).?

    you won’t lost a ton here, but the aggravation is apparent. Sell it honestly and include the original listing and identify who had it professionally re-finished. The new owner will be excited to have it arrive.

    Pain in your ass, I can’t help you there. But with some Patience it will work out ok
     
  9. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2021
  10. Samuel Fuentes

    Samuel Fuentes New Member

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    Gentlemen,
    Yes I do admit that it has been totally my fault. I believed the seller when he said that it was an EB-3L. And I had it re-finished before I ascertained what it actually was. The serial #'s are not "Stamped" onto the headstock, the #'s as well as the "Made in the USA" are inked on. And the #'s were not recorded before it was sanded down and re-finished. But really, if you didn't know, who would have thought that a 21 fretted model was a short scale while a 20 fret model was a long scale. The pick up position on both models is the same (on '72 models) The two give-a-ways that I didn't know then (but know now) is that the '72 long scale has 20 frets while the short scale has 21 and the position of the bridge on the body. On the Long scale, the bridge is almost flush with the end of the body while on the short scale, the bridge is approx 3" from the end.
    I love the EB-3. I will prob keep her. She's a bit heavier than the SG (the body is about 1/4" thicker) but it's the model I fell in love as a youngster but could never afford.
     
  11. Samuel Fuentes

    Samuel Fuentes New Member

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    Dan on the '72 models the pickups on both the long scale and short scale are in the same location.
     
  12. Samuel Fuentes

    Samuel Fuentes New Member

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    Permission to land. NO the serial #'s are not "Stamped" into the wood. They are inked on as well as the "Made in the USA"
     
  13. Samuel Fuentes

    Samuel Fuentes New Member

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    Chute,
    There is no "Everything EB-3 forum.
    And No, I wasn't aware of the difference in fret #'s. But really, if you didn't know would you have thought that the 20 fret was a long scale and the 21 fret a short scale?
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2021
  14. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    It may look like ink, but it is not. Gibson serial numbers have been stamped into the wood since 1961 with only a few exceptions.

    [​IMG]

    https://www.creamcitymusic.com/vint...ong-scale-electric-bass-guitar-walnut-finish/

    Sometimes it looks inked, like here:

    [​IMG]

    https://www.flyguitars.com/gibson/bass/1972gibsonEB3L.php

    And here:

    [​IMG]

    But that's just the black grain filler they use.
     
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  15. Chuteboxehero

    Chuteboxehero Well-Known Member

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    I agree I would assume more frets equals a longer scale. But you know what they say when you assume.... Especially if you're about to spend money on a vintage guitar or bass.
     
  16. pancake81

    pancake81 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that’s some cool info there PTL! I also didn’t realize that one of models without a stamped serial number makes it even slightly more cool and rare. Neat stuff

     
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  17. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, off the top of my head, the exceptions are some transitional models around '75-'77 when they were working on a new serial number system and used waterslide decals and silk screening, and modern Custom Shop non-reissue models.
     
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  18. Les’s Nemesis

    Les’s Nemesis Member

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    Is there a photo of the serial # from the seller's photos that you could preserve?

    But, sounds to me like you have a nice guitar now... just not exactly what you were looking for. I'd sell the newer one and keep the newly refinished one as it was "your project".
     
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  19. Samuel Fuentes

    Samuel Fuentes New Member

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    P2land,
    Thank you for the info. My head stock, (before the re-finish), looked like your 2nd picture I have been in contact with the re-finisher and he did record the serial #. They are 745290
    I have contacted Gibson and asked for a build date according to that #. Thank you kindly for your time and imput. :)
     
  20. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    There is no way to determine a build date from those serials. They didn't contain specific info regarding build date and can only vaguely suggest a year. They re-used numbers frequently back then and didn't follow any real formula. Because of that, serial numbers are one of the least reliable dating tools. You're much better off dating based on physical build features. I haven't gotten into basses yet, but much of the same info applies to them, like volutes appearing, laminated necks, the made in USA stamp... those all occurred at roughly the same time across all of Gibson's lineup:

    https://solidguitar.fandom.com/wiki/Dating#Other_Changes

    That said, your serial does fall within an expected range for 1972. It could also point to 1975 though. Pot codes would be helpful in further determining.
     
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